It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Gambling With Commodities Is Fleecing Our Society

page: 2
1
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 23 2008 @ 08:16 PM
link   

Originally posted by 44soulslayer
You proposal for needing physical delivery is ridiculous and would result in only increased shipping and storage


This part of your answer sounds much like why we went to paper money instead of carrying gold around. Paper is so much easier to manipulate, just print somemore.


And while we are at it, your food prices arent controlled by speculation. They are controlled by supply and demand. Thus your premise is entirely wrong anyway.


Speculation trades on commodities based on transient daily factors do act to jack up the prices by creating artifical supply and demand.

Before everyone starts to flame on, I would suggest you read the entire OP. I'm not saying we should do away entirely with the Free Market, only to adjust it so that it better serves all citizens, now and in future generations. I think it's dangerous to commodify our natural resources.

Is Capitalism so fragile and tenuous that it can't stand a little scrutiny? If so, then it really is all smoke and mirrors and it's no wonder people get so defensive when it's called into question.




posted on Mar, 23 2008 @ 09:11 PM
link   
So I was right, Marxism.

When Government gets involved in the exchange of goods and the money that is made, you will have more trouble than can be handled. Inflation, deflation, recession, depression.

Let the MKT take care of it's self. There will always be good times and bad.

Every thing works on the wave theory.

Roper



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 06:48 AM
link   

Originally posted by kosmicjack
This part of your answer sounds much like why we went to paper money instead of carrying gold around. Paper is so much easier to manipulate, just print somemore.


I never said i agree with fiat money. I am all for a gold-backed currency! Delimiting the dollar was the biggest error ever made.



Speculation trades on commodities based on transient daily factors do act to jack up the prices by creating artifical supply and demand.


No doubt they do, but they also take prices down every so often. I dont see any complaints when this happens! The great thing about the free market is the ability to trade at will. Are you suggesting we take away this ability, in effect stopping some people from trading?



Is Capitalism so fragile and tenuous that it can't stand a little scrutiny? If so, then it really is all smoke and mirrors and it's no wonder people get so defensive when it's called into question.


Haha capitalism will stand the test of time, we neednt defend it. The free market is proven to be the only method for creating a prosperous society. I suggest you look at the history of the free market port countries such as singapore, hong kong, dubai, abu dhabi, aden etc. Any place which allows free trade is incredibly prosperous as compared to the heavily restricted and taxed regions of the world such as soviet russia.

I can see where youre coming from as a consumer, but did you know that commodity prices just fell about 30% last week? The price you pay at the store has more to do with currency inflation and the retail inflation caused by higher oil and therefore transport prices.

I actually trade in commodities, which is why im so fervent about this issue
, im not too happy about that 30% drop either!



posted on Mar, 25 2008 @ 07:11 AM
link   
My assertion is not so far off base:

www.businessweek.com...


The Commodity Futures Trading Commission said last week it will meet with farmers, traders and grain sellers next month to assess the recent price jumps.

The loss of equilibrium has rattled large grain merchants that buy wheat and other crops and sell them to food processors like Kellogg Co. and General Mills Inc.

"There has been a huge influx of capital from index funds and pension funds to the point now where futures markets are not reflecting actual supply and demand," said Todd Kemp, spokesman for the National Grain and Feed Association.

As a result, Kemp said grain buyers have had to pay more to hedge themselves against future price shifts. Some of those expenses have been passed on to food processors and then to consumers. The futures volatility is adding to a cocktail of cost-raising factors that have pushed bread, cereal and other staples to record highs.

The price of white bread rose to $1.32 a pound last month, up 28 percent from a year ago, according to government data.



posted on Mar, 25 2008 @ 07:21 AM
link   
reply to post by kosmicjack
 


Doesnt change the fact that when investors start shorting commodities, nobody will complain when the price goes down.

Its the free market baby, its a rollercoaster.



posted on Mar, 26 2008 @ 10:30 AM
link   
Here's a question from the little people, one of whom I happen to be:

What do you do if you're a nine-to-five working man who doesn't understand a word of this, and wouldn't have the disposable income to take part even if you did understand?

I'm not dumb, but this stuff is all a foreign language to me. How would someone like me have a chance in Hell to get started in all this, and hopefully make some money?

I recognize the need to invest. But one thing I think you long-timers forget is that the vast majority of Americans is clueless about all this. I admit I'm one of them. Economics on this level was simply not taught in my high school, unless you were in some already-advanced class. I don't have a college degree and can't afford to go back and pursue one. I have a load of debt, an effectively fixed income, no benefits, a job that is shaping up to be a dead-ender and no prospects for anything better.

Fact is, about 60-70% of Americans are just like me--and the numbers are increasing. Only 20% of Americans have a Bachelor's Degree or higher level of education. Online degrees, while tempting to one who works and can't afford time off for school, are simply not accepted as "real" by many employers. I don't have the money to go back to school. I can't get student loans; I've tried. I have no idea how to get started investing. If I really scrimp I might, might have an extra $50-$100/month to put towards investments. When I see ads for brokerages offering trades at $8 and that's supposed to be a low price it's very intimidating.

What is someone like myself supposed to do?



posted on Mar, 26 2008 @ 05:50 PM
link   
reply to post by The Nighthawk
 


Nighthawk, commodity trading really is not investing. It's more of a gamble. There are certain trading techniques that help to level the playing field and there are tool boxes, trading software that help also.

Roper



new topics

top topics



 
1
<< 1   >>

log in

join