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'Death to Ahmadinejad,' Iranian crowds cry

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posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by Harlequin
 


I bet if an angry mob in the United States did the same thing in unison, only replacing "Bush" with "Ahmadineijad", there'd be nothing anybody could do about it.




posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by chromatico
 


no thats different - thats demonstrating about another country so would be supported - but keep that `Bush` and see how fast it is cracked down.



posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 04:11 PM
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reply to post by Harlequin
 


What are the police going to do about it? March in there and get ripped to shreds?



posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 04:23 PM
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This is good news to me, and more evidence to me that the theocracy in Iran will be overturned by the Iranians themselves, and not outside interference.

Ahmadinejad is becoming increasingly unpopular due to his confrontational rhetoric and it's economic consequences in Iran. He has also failed to improve the lives of the working class Iranians who were his chief supporters, and he's even angered some of the religious conservatives (who know what kind of demographic bomb they are sitting on) by taking things too far.

By the way, about the police photographing protesters thing, that's become standard practice in the West as well lately...

PS: anyone else notice Mozilla's spellchecker tries to correct "Ahmadinejad" to "Shadiness"?


[edit on 3/19/08 by xmotex]



posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 04:57 PM
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The Greatest Common Denominator

It is interesting to compare this account to what might happen in America if a group chanted "Death to Bush!"

Perhaps a group of protesters could get away with it, but if a single protester chanted this outside the White House, he or she would probably be arrested and prosecuted for "threatening the President".

Though I know it's popular for my fellow Americans to point to a nation like Iran as repressive (which it is), I think it's extremely important to recognize and respect that we're not so far removed from a similar state of affairs here in the U.S.

The only real difference being that it takes much more courage to express dissent in Iran than it does here, for now.

The truth is that there is no meaningful difference between people in Iran and people in the U.S., or people in any country for that matter.

Ultimately, we all want what is best for ourselves and our children.

And just as in the U.S., as long as any form of dissent is possible in Iran, there is hope.



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