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"Unstuck" in time, traveling through time without your body

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posted on Mar, 18 2008 @ 08:29 PM
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I have a strong feeling this has been brought up before, but it's baffeling me why when I search it up, it seems to be there's no real talk about out there?

Now I'm basing this off of "Lost" (amazing show, for the record), even though I know you might just say "it's science fiction", but they used this idea in a recent episode, and paid homage to "Slaughterhouse-Five" where the character becomes "unstuck" in time. They also try to keep things very logical in the show, if time travel is logical in your opinion.

But when watching Lost, it brings up the idea of time-travel, but only with your consciousness, your mind. Your body becomes catatonic.

From what I loosely know about "quantum leaping", or "becoming unstuck", is it has a relation to electromagnetism. Extreme amounts of radiation.
This, causes you to switch between places in time.
But it has consequences (according to the "Lost" theory)

Let's say your normally living in the year 2008, and this happens, so you go back to...let's say 1982?
Your consciousness from 1982 will switch with the consciousness of 2008, and vice-versa.
So once you return to the year 2008, you will be completely confused of to where you are, because you believe it's still 1982.

Then it starts happening faster, you begin switching faster through time, until ... your brain can't handle it, and you have a brain hemorrhage (apparently).
A sign of that you can't handle it, is that your nose starts bleeding.

But the only way you can stop from dying as a cause of the time-travel, is to find a "constant", an anchor in time in other words. Something that exists in the past and the future.


Excuse me if this explanation was confusing, in any way?
I'm naturally assuming some of you might have a bit of knowledge of this, or have seen the same episode of Lost I've seen.

I've just been wanting to discuss this with someone, and if it's even remotely possible.

[edit on 18-3-2008 by KyleHalv6]




posted on Mar, 18 2008 @ 09:15 PM
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Slaughter House Five was a great book, and an autobiography.
Did you know that?

Kurt Vonnegut was/is Billy Pilgrim.

He was a POW of the Germans during the bombing of Dresdin. He survived the fire bombing by hiding in a meat refrigerator in a slaughterhouse where he was being forced to work as slave labor.

If certain experiences are intense enough, then time is meaningless in relation to them. The mind can flash back to those events.
And then forward to others. This is the meaning of being unstuck in time.

Some call it Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Once the trick is learned, a beautiful mind might learn to use it to escape to better events. Or perhaps create a better universe for itself.

My father had PTSD from WWII the same war as Kurt.
PTSD sucks royally and only brought him misery, frantic misery.
I once met another man with worse PTSD than my father. I did not think that possible until I met this other fellow. I knew what his problem was instantly. The effects are so profoundly distinct. They met each other and instantly recognized their common bond too. Even 30 or 40 years after the trauma a huge sign is flashing all around them constantly "Unstuck In Time!".

You do not want to learn that trick, not even if you have a beautiful mind capable of harnessing it like Mr Vonnegut.



posted on Mar, 18 2008 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by KyleHalv6
 


I guess it's possible, I assume you mean one can only go where one exist.


Your body becomes catatonic.

Why? Don't you return in time? No pun intended.



So once you return to the year 2008, you will be completely confused of to where you are, because you believe it's still 1982.

Not necessarily so, maybe so, maybe not, probably not so.



Then it starts happening faster, you begin switching faster through time, until ... your brain can't handle it, and you have a brain hemorrhage (apparently).

That can't be good.
You better stop it then.
No, I don't watch Lost.



But the only way you can stop from dying as a cause of the time-travel, is to find a "constant", an anchor in time in other words. Something that exists in the past and the future.

I don't understand. I thought you are the anchor.

Do you really want to go to the past or the future now? There is a theory that says when you die you will become multidimensional, so you'll be able to cross time easily.



posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 05:38 PM
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reply to post by Jazzyguy
 


Lol, I assumed I explained it poorly.
A constant, in this case a physical constant, is a physical quantity that is generally believed to be both universal in nature and constant in time.

This is why if you were to be switching between places in time, your brain would have a hard time knowing in what time period it was in. So if you found a "constant", something you can come in contact with that exists in both time periods (even a person), I guess your brain would realize this and put everything together, and the effects would stop. You would regain all knowledge of where you are (were?) and would be in the time period you're suppose to be in.

That's the best I can explain it.

Cyberbian, that's interesting you brought that up. I had no idea it was an autobiography.
Sounds like a great book, and the symptoms you brought up about PTSD are very insightful.
Are there many cases like this, where your mind can actually trick itself into believing your somewhere else?



posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 06:02 PM
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Originally posted by KyleHalv6
But when watching Lost, it brings up the idea of time-travel, but only with your consciousness, your mind. Your body becomes catatonic.


The people trained in remote viewing by the Army generally accept that when they used the technique, time didn't matter. They could just as easily gain impressions of an event that happened a thousand years ago, or a thousand years from now, as they could about things happening right now.

It ties in with sci-fi author Philip K. Dick's musings about everything happening all the "time," with only our perception of it changing. Also with that cheesy movie with Christopher Reeve where he "thinks" himself back in time and falls in love. "Time After Time," I believe it was called. Based on a book that I don't recall at the moment.

The hardest part, or course, it letting go of your perceptions of the present world, your identity, and the confines that other consciousnesses restrict you to. That's where the remote viewing training comes in.



posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 07:05 PM
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If certain experiences are intense enough, then time is meaningless in relation to them.



If certain experiences are intense enough, they transcend or obliterate the perception of what that we call Time.

Just thought I'd help make it even more precise.



P.S. Do read Cortazar's short story Moebius strip, if you haven't so far.
It's not at all about "time travelling" or anything like that, but you may like it.
It's truly poignant and powerful.



posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 07:11 PM
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And people call my musings pointless.



posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 07:23 PM
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"Time After Time," I believe it was called. Based on a book that I don't recall at the moment.



I loved that film!

Especially




SPOILER! SPOILER! SPOILER! SPOILER!






Jack the Ripper's concise assessment of the current situation:

"A hundred years ago, I was a monster; today, I am a mere amateur..."





[edit on 19-3-2008 by Vanitas]



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