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Another 777 incident

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posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 05:18 PM
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What the heck is going on with the 777 fleet? One landed in Saudi Arabia last week with a major structural component sticking through the top of the wing. It appears to have happened just above where the right main landing gear attaches to the wing. It's not sure if it happened before or after the landing gear was deployed. A passenger took a picture and video of it. He reported a loud bang during the flight, and looked out and saw the damage to the wing. Boeing has deployed a team to try to figure out what happened.

Source




posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 05:31 PM
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You obviously missed the American Airlines 777 which suffered an identical failure of engines to respond to throttle commands on approach at LAX on 29 February 2008. That was far more frightening.



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 05:32 PM
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The saudi aircraft was on finals and had just lowered its undercarraige when the spar went through the wing.



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 05:33 PM
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No I didn't but that was found to be caused by the copilot's hand blocking the throttle. But that's why this thread is called "ANOTHER 777 incident."



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 05:37 PM
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There was a warning published late last year that the Boeing 787 was highly susceptible to hacking:




posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 06:04 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


that the AA trip 7? if so , then apparantly he( the F/O) has a wierd arm as the level he was apparantly holding to block the throttles was on the captains side and not holding his own one



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


please correct me if i'm wrong, but that looks to me like an arm and actuator like the ones used to deploy the flaps... kind of like something jammed, the actuator kept pushing, a mounting gave and the arm the actuator was pushing on came up.



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 06:25 PM
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Originally posted by Harlequin
reply to post by Zaphod58
 


that the AA trip 7? if so , then apparantly he( the F/O) has a wierd arm as the level he was apparantly holding to block the throttles was on the captains side and not holding his own one


I THINK it was the copilot, I'm going by memory on this one, but ONE of the pilots had his hand blocking the throttle. It doesn't take much to block it and keep it from moving.



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 06:27 PM
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reply to post by rat256
 


It's hard to tell from the picture. It could be a portion of the landing gear, but I suspect that you're right. I'm gonna be digging into this one as well as the others I'm looking at and see what I can find over the next few days.



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 06:50 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


and there i thought one would take 777 as a lucky number

seriously though, have these planes been grounded or are these just random happenings?



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 06:52 PM
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They are all unrelated incidents. They're still looking at what caused the British Air crash landing. The American Airlines was pilot error. No idea what the cause for this one will be. It's still a very safe plane to fly, just that these all seem to be happening at the same time.



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 07:49 PM
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Rat256, you may have a point. It appears to be a slat actuator that is liberating a nice spray of $70 a gal Skydrol to the atmosphere. Most likely caused by a Flap Jackscrew that has overtraveled and broken a flap track and ripped the actuator off the rear spar.



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 08:22 PM
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I work as an airline Pilot in Hong Kong and I also fly the 777 ...... it's a fantastic plane but like any aircraft when you miss treat it for long enough it will come back to bite you.

Some of these foreign carriers have terrible company cultures of not reporting heavy landings and other incidents. They also like to bring God into the cockpit literally god is your copilot.

Friends that have flown for airlines based in islamic countries have said that when the weather is terrible and the crew are faced with difficult situations they simple shrug their shoulders and say "allah will take good care of us". With no disrespect to any particular faith I think it's foolish to operate in demanding environments relying on god for ultimate protection.

The subsequent result is aircraft are punished through thunderstorms , wind shear and other scenario's that normally wouldn't be attempted buy the "athiest pilot" ... the structure is weakened because of this and then ultimately down the track other problems will arise due to this lack of care and unreported heavy landings.

Happy landing everyone ....







posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 08:27 PM
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Yes but you can hardly say that about British Airways and American Airlines, both of which were involved in the previous two incidents. Both of those airlines have excellent maintenance procedures and records.



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 08:32 PM
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This was a -200ER right? I have forgotten the BA model. I wonder if they simply have gotten in enough flight cycles and this kind of stuff is cropping up???? I know its a stretch, but these a/c are long hual animals and while they have the same number of flight hours as some narrow body short huals they have fewer cycles so it may have taken longer for stuff like this to show up?



posted on Mar, 18 2008 @ 04:38 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
Yes but you can hardly say that about British Airways and American Airlines, both of which were involved in the previous two incidents. Both of those airlines have excellent maintenance procedures and records.


In the AA-case it seems to be the First Officer operating the speedbrake, and while holding the speedbrake lever, slightly impeding the forward movement of the throttle on engine no. 1.

SOP dictates hands on lever whenever it's extended.

[edit on 18-3-2008 by Freaky_Animal]



posted on Mar, 18 2008 @ 04:44 AM
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^^


aye just read the report break down - he was holding the speedbrake lever (as per sop) and left arm was resting on the throttle with approx 1.5 pounds pressure thus holding it back ; accurately reproduced in the simulator



posted on Mar, 18 2008 @ 04:49 AM
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reply to post by jpvskyfreak
 


Having some experience with Chinese aircrew in the sim in a not to distant past my observations are that loss of face are far worse than loss of life for many of them, and CRM almost non existing.
Just a fact, a completely different culture i guess.

Things are getting better, but there's still a long way to go.



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