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'Cancer chemical' in soy sauce

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posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 06:08 AM
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'Cancer chemical' in soy sauce


www.news.com.au



AUSTRALIANS should try to limit their exposure to a "probably" cancer-causing chemical found in many common foods including soy sauce, the food regulator has urged.
Food Standards Australia New Zealand said ethyl carbamate (EC) can occur naturally in foods including breads, yoghurt and alcohol that undergo fermentation during processing or storage.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer last year upgraded the risk of EC from "possibly'' carcinogenic to humans to "probably'' carcinogenic.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 06:08 AM
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When i first saw this headline i thought it to be just another crazy groups making claims, however, it is a Food Standards corporation acting on advice from the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

Maybe this is not one of those cancer causing 'things' that we add to our extensive list and maybe take a little heed from it.

www.news.com.au
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 06:15 AM
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ut the regulator said its own studies on the chemical showed it was not as great problem in Australia as some other countries.

"The risk to health and safety for Australians from exposure to EC through alcoholic drinks, other than sake, is negligible, even for high consumers.''


Whew! on that last sentence.

But really, these findings have me worried. I personally love soy sauce, and saturate my rice, steamed dim sims, etc in it.
But then you've got to think of all the probably cancer-causing chemicals we're exposed to all the time in this day and age. I just finished off 10 bucks worth of fish n' chips, and am currently eyeing off a tin of Pringles: I wonder what all those oils and processed potato is doing for me? Nothing good, I can probably safely assume.



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 06:23 AM
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Or maybe its just horse manure. Japanese and Chinese people have been consuming soy sauce for centuries. Considering that eastasian medicine was pretty advanced for it's time, I'm pretty certain if it were really bad they'd have discovered it in the past.

I put this news headline up there along with "chopsticks can cause arthritis". Nonsense designed to grab attention. It's quite telling, since other than the headline and the thesis statement, nowhere else does it mention the foods tested or even provide the name of the journal where the paper ought to have been published if it is to be considered trustworthy.

I don't trust journalistic interpretations of science. The science writers all have no-clue and should stick to sci-fi.

/rant over.

If you really want to avoid cancer, do everything in moderation. That's all there really is to it. The greater risk from soy sauce isn't it's "probable" carcinogenic properties; it's the salt content. Too much salt is proven to be bad for health. Proven for centuries.

WTR: check the salt content of the can of Pringles -- it's more than the RDA... worry about that instead of something as yet unproven.



posted on Mar, 17 2008 @ 06:35 AM
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Originally posted by Beachcoma
Or maybe its just horse manure. Japanese and Chinese people have been consuming soy sauce for centuries. Considering that eastasian medicine was pretty advanced for it's time, I'm pretty certain if it were really bad they'd have discovered it in the past.


Maybe not horse manure. But your point of it being something to do with modern manufacturing of an old substance is most likely correct.




Originally posted by Beachcoma
I put this news headline up there along with "chopsticks can cause arthritis". Nonsense designed to grab attention. It's quite telling, since other than the headline and the thesis statement, nowhere else does it mention the foods tested or even provide the name of the journal where the paper ought to have been published if it is to be considered trustworthy.


The article did not but i decided to be nice and find some more information for you.

This appears to be the report of Ethyl carbamate, which is the substance in question.

PDF Document of the Report

Knock yourself out looking through this nice and large amount of links from the government agency itself. There appears to be enough information there.

Australian New Zealand Food Standards Link 1
Australian New Zealand Food Standards Link 2

EDIT: Fixed links

[edit on 17/3/2008 by SilentShadow]




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