Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Tent cities have sprung up outside Los Angeles

page: 5
40
<< 2  3  4    6  7  8 >>

log in

join

posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 03:29 PM
link   
reply to post by Myrdyn
 


I don't know much about modern UK law. I am a law school student in the U.S. As you may know, the U.S. has borrowed much of its law from England, but as the U.S. grew as a nation, it began to develop its own common law and English law became less influential. The US law of adverse possession may differ than UK laws in that there may be a different historical basis for the laws.

U.S. adverse possession laws developed when people in the Eastern U.S. purchased land on the western frontier. The Eastern U.S. landowners were often unaware of what was going on with their property and the frontier and often did not utilize their land. Others who lived out on the frontier would utilize the eastern land owners' land. The common law of adverse possession was developed as a way to encourage the utilization of land.




posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 03:35 PM
link   
reply to post by hotpinkurinalmint
 


Thanks HotPink.. I was just wondering how the Law of the People, by the People might be of some use For the People. Especially those in most need right now.



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 03:38 PM
link   
reply to post by Myrdyn
 


I don't think adverse possession will be of much help to these people. Especially since it takes several years to adversely possess property and in California, they would have to pay property taxes on the property.



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 03:45 PM
link   

Originally posted by Myrdyn
Further to my last.. Does anyone feel that this is just the tip of a very large Iceberg?


My guess is no. While it is true there will be a few people out there that will wind up homeless due to the poor economy and mortgage mess, there, there are too many powerful interests out there that do not want to see mass evictions.

It is in the bank's best interest not to foreclose on every bad mortgage. The banks will lose less money by reaching some sort of compromise with most of their borrowers than by evicting large numbers of people.

There are many industries that will suffer if there are widespread foreclosures. Even more industries would suffer if there was widespread homelessness due to foreclosures. These industries will use their influence on the government to prevent widespread foreclosures and homelessness not for the good of the people, but to protect their own interests.



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 03:48 PM
link   
I've often 'Google Earthed' across the US. Huge and I mean 'HUGE' areas of it appear to be empty countryside. I've heard of 'Ghost Town' that have simply been abandonned. There must be water supplies avalaible in these areas. I wonder if settlements could be established where homeless people could start a new life. Similar projects have happened in Scotland. The problem here is that the weather is so awful for most of the year.



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 03:50 PM
link   
reply to post by anxietydisorder
 


It really breaks my heart to see someone so cold and cynical. I'm not being sarcastic. I live in California, I've seen all of this firsthand. Our society is much different than that of Canada. Has everyone forgotten the commercials that the real estate companies used to run during the real estate boom. They told renters to buy....it's cheaper. There's a lot of emotion that goes along with owning a home...better schools for the kids, a yard for a dog, etc. It's not about keeping up with the Jones'. People got caught up....in hope...hope that their lives will improve, that things would change, and that they would earn more. Most people weren't at home sitting on their arses watching their interest rate explode.

Please people, we need to change. Be kind to our fellow human beings.

By the way, this is one of my first posts. I couldn't let this one go without comment.

Peace



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:02 PM
link   
some of the replies on this post disturb me. Besides the fact that I just moved from LA, and have been saying that I've been getting bad feelings about that place and had to leave, the system is set up for this type of thing to happen.

Kind of goes along with the visions me and a few people I know out there had, but No need to get into that.

In the neighborhood I grew up in, my family's house value has gone up 400% since 01 or so. But this was "Little Haiti" a pretty low cost neighborhood albeit adjacent to the Design District. Lots of money came in to revitalize the design district, probably drug money laundering. While I was gone from miami, a lot of political corruption, looting a lot of the funds that were supposed to be for affordable housing. When they tore down project buildings they moved the people to homestead of pembroke pines/mirimar area.

SO now the people who live here can't afford the taxes on the places they own, and all the properties in the surrounding neighborhoods keep things on the market if you're trying to sell.

WHat is one to do? This is the new Germany. Get ready for Hitler JR. Seriously it's like I've seen this all before...


[edit on 3/15/2008 by acegotflows]



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:02 PM
link   
reply to post by hotpinkurinalmint
 


In the light of the current economy you're probably right HotPink. However, there are signs of a world recession on the horizon. The mortgage lenders are only as flexible as their investors will allow. If the big crunch comes, interest rates are bound to skyrocket and many homeowners might just consider it's not worth it. Yes, the Government could do something about it, but they would be risking very high inflation which would effectively reduce the value of the dollar.

Either way, it is happening now and it's not just in the US. The media will be searching for other tented camps around the world, where homeless people are beginning to gather. Those on the 'edge' will say 'I could do that' and whether our governments like it or not, these camps will become more widespread.


[edit on 15/3/08 by Myrdyn]



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:09 PM
link   
I live in Scotland and find this thread a revelation re the current housing situation in the USA, the supposedly richest country in the world. I should explain that my wife and I are in our 60's and receive a Government Pension Credit payment of £170 pw as I lost my job due to ill health. We live in a 4 in a block 1930 Cottage flat which has 2 large bedrooms and a very spacious living room. l also have a very large garden in which I grow a lot of veg. We pay the princely sum of £254 per year for this accomodation and have no intention of buying the property, currently valued at (£ 170k ) although we have the option of doing this with a 70% discount as we have lived in the flat for over 5 years. I just wondered why people feel that they must have to own the house/flat that they live in, as it doesn't seem to me to be as sound an investment for the future that buyers believe it to be. I have to say that I really feel so very sorry for the unfortunate people who are reduced to living in tents and sincerely hope that this is only temporary for them, but can't understand why the option of affordable rented accomodation could not be provided by the Government. Oops, forgot about the $12 billion per month cost of the wars !

just my 2 pence



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:15 PM
link   
reply to post by enddays
 

These problems simply wouldn't exist if rented accommodation was available for everyone at the rate of £254 per year.

[edit on 15/3/08 by Myrdyn]



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:19 PM
link   
I'm dumbfounded with some of the narrow-minded comments in this thread. Some people seem to think that no one falls on hard times unless they are a slacker. Sheez!

I've seen the best of people have just one of the two in a household lose their jobs through no fault of their own and get evicted over it. We are in an economy now where there are masses living paycheck to paycheck even renting (it's not that much cheaper than paying a mortgage in a lot of places) that are not living beyond survival level and they still go under. The job market is almost non-existant, gas and food prices, health insurance - everything going UP.

The foreclosures are another story, but I'm sorry, the banks are getting bailed out and the people are losing their homes anyway. We should be bailing out the middle class and instead we are bailing out banks. Banks that played hard and fast with the rules, creating this mess, allowing this mess, and now they are bailed out and who cares where the people end up. Where is the outrage against that?

Yes, everyone who got into a mortgage should be responsible for putting their name on that document and know what it said, but I have news for you. The past two decades we have seriously dumbed down this country, don't ask me why, but it's frightening, and it should scare everyone that this could happen in what was suppossed to be the greatest country in the world.

I'll give you an example; the first question asked of potential renters are what is your gross household income per week? More than half of the inquries respond "I don't know, I get paid bi-weekly". So if anyone thinks the majority of people the Banks were qualifying for mortgages (when they shouldn't have), had a clue they were not going to be able to make the payments two years later, you are kidding yourselves.

Now, the real question people better be asking themselves is if the company you work for cuts back and 1 person in your household loses a job, exactly how long can you go before you can't make the mortgage OR RENT payment? Really? Now add 90 days to that because that is when you will be evicted in most places.

This situation should be scaring everyone because it could happen to anyone, and it's already started. I haven't seen tent cities on the east coast yet, but I wouldn't be surprised if they are here, and I have no doubt people are living without roofs over their heads who would have been considered middle class a year or two ago. If you don't see this you have got to have blinders on.


The bottom line is the majority of people right now cannot afford a job cut, an illness, an accident, or any glitch in their day to day without being in serious financial trouble. If you are not one of them count your blessings, but don't kid yourself on the state of the average Joe right now in this country.



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:19 PM
link   
"I have to say that I really feel so very sorry for the unfortunate people who are reduced to living in tents and sincerely hope that this is only temporary for them, but can't understand why the option of affordable rented accomodation could not be provided by the Government "

Is this not having sympathy Myrdyn ?


[edit on 15-3-2008 by enddays]



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:26 PM
link   
reply to post by enddays
 



Agreed, but we know why the government doesn't have money to keep people off the streets. They don't care. They are spending it on the war, and bailing out banks. Oh wait, everyone is getting a $600.00 rebate from the government to help us out. That's costing a pretty penny too, but in all honesty, that's not even one months rent anywhere I know of. It's not going to make a dent in anything for anyone I know.



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:26 PM
link   

Originally posted by Myrdyn
reply to post by enddays
 

These problems simply wouldn't exist if rented accommodation was available for everyone at the rate of £254 per year.

[edit on 15/3/08 by Myrdyn]


There is cheap housing available in the US. Perhaps not 254 pound a year ($500), but one can rent an apartment for less than $500 a month. The problem is that there is no cheap housing in Calfornia.

I live in California and am fully aware of how expensive it is to live out here and own property. I have had many friends that moved to other parts of the US because it was too expensive out here. Many of the people who have fallen on hard times should probably consider leaving Calfornia. They might be able to get housing at a small fraction of the price they are paying now.



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:34 PM
link   
reply to post by hotpinkurinalmint
 


I'm suppossedly in one of the more affordable places in Florida and rent for a one bedroom efficiency starts at $600.00. That's more than a single person can afford if there are not better than minimum wage jobs, and there aren't. These people would qualify for housing assistance, but there is no money left in that program. So the bottom line is people are landing on the streets - or worse - resorting to crime.

Also, if you are down to your last penny, how would these people get to a more affordable location and come up with a security deposit or qualify for a rental without a job first? You can't get a job till you find a place to live, but you can't get a place to live without a job. We have to be realistic about this.



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:37 PM
link   
reply to post by anxietydisorder
 


It may be your job but then you should know from the beginning that folks who are loosing their homes never owned them in the first place. The lie is that lending institutions sell loans but tell their customers that they are lending them money. A loan does not equal money. The other thing is that borrowers for mortgages are referred to as "homeowners" when in fact they are not. These "homeowners" do not have the title and furthermore the title which is held by the lending institution or investment fund (hedge fund) holds the title sans any identifiable owner. Even the investors are kept at a distance from what they should by all rights own. So neither does the borrower own the home and neither can the investor whose capital financed the home collect the property directly.

The entire home lending operation is the largest scam that has ever existed. It serves only to benefit the banks who take signed loans and sell them as negotiable instruments at a value that affects the banks bottom line and attractiveness to yet even more investors.

Yes many of the general public are woefully uninformed and uneducated about the dangers of home, auto, and credit financing. Still, you can hardly blame them since lenders lie, lie, and lie some more in order to convince borrowers to sign on the dotted line. The media and US government play a role in propagating this illusion of homeownership as well, but not nearly to the extent that lenders are responsible.

You talk about defendants who rather buy booze or drugs or whatever else, but you don't take into account that their behavior is symptomatic of what they have learned. What they have learned is that debt finances their dreams.

"Bad credit? No credit? Don't worry. We can HELP you."

How many times have you heard that boldfaced lie on afternoon TV between scenes of court TV, or late night TV, or on FM and AM radio, or plastered on billboards?

"Get the money you need! Buy a car. Fix your home. Do whatever you want with the cash. Call us NOW."

All lies. Largely directed towards the disenfranchised as a way to make them feel as if they are included and are participants in the franchise. Lies, lies, lies. Blacks, Whites, Reds, Browns, and Yellows, you name it, the entire disenfranchised demographic is targeted by lies to get them to borrow what they are incapable of paying back. And at every step they are referred to as "owners", and what they borrow is referred to as money or cash. Lies.

If you know better, then you should know better. Why would a lending institution lend to persons they KNOW will not be capable of repaying? The grandest lie of them all makes up the answer to that question. Ironically, that answer also implies the truth that is behind these scams.



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:41 PM
link   
reply to post by Relentless
 


Ok, now if people were more realistic and actually saved their money, some of these problems could be prevented.

Yes I know it takes 90 days usually to be evicted. Say someone in the house does get laid off, you have unemployment payments. Granted unemployment is not even close to full pay, but it, along with your savings should be enough to weather you until you can find another job.

If the person can not live at bare minimum needs for at least 6 months on savings, plus an additional 3 months from unemployment and find a job, then you've got major issues. I was on workers comp leave for a year, then unemployed for 4 months after that and still maintained at least 4 months of expenses in the bank at all times until I found my current job.

People are living well beyond their means in all aspects. No one requires a brand new forty thousand dollar car, no one requires a 50 inch flat screen tv, Or three dogs that need a huge lawn, or every brand new toy in the world for the kids, no one requires eating out every single night because they are too lazy.

People need to realize they can not live like the personalities on TV, and start living within their means. Yes you will have less stuff, but if stuff is what makes you happy, then you've got bigger issues at hand.



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:47 PM
link   
reply to post by Hypntick
 


The people I see going under are not the people spending money on giant cars and other luxuries. They are the people living paycheck to paycheck, who never had a chance to save up enough to cushion an unexpected event. If they educated themselves, they start their lives in debt (student loans, etc.) and if they don't, they never stand a chance of a decent job. There's too many people in this boat.



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:50 PM
link   
reply to post by Relentless
 


I am not saying that it would be easy for a Calfornia family to move across the country, but it is possible and in the long run is a better option than trying to make it out here.

Foreclosures do not happen overnight. The process takes several weeks. Furthermore, foreclosures do not sneak up on people. People will often know a few months in advance that they are in danger of foreclosure. When somebody knows they are in danger of foreclosure, they need to begin on planning on what they are going to do. One possible plan for these people in California and other expensive areas is to move to a cheaper part of the country.

The people being foreclosed on are not minimum wage earners. A typical mortgage payment in Calfiornia for a 3 bedroom house can exceed $3000. I was on craigslist and saw that 3 bedroom apartments in Cleveland were renting at less than $1000 a month. If a California could use one of their mortgage payments for a first, and last month's rent plus deposit on a cleveland apartment, they are on their way to relocating to a place they can afford.

Granted, many of the people that are being foreclosed wound up in their predicament due to poor planning and judgment. They may also have feelings of being entitled to live in an expensive part of the country just as they felt they were entitlted to own an expensive house. These people will need to take extaordinary measures to keep a roof over their head, and one of those measure may be leaving the state.



posted on Mar, 15 2008 @ 04:50 PM
link   
Fellow men and women in the U.S. Thanks this to the Jews what you will experience in the next weeks. Total collapse of the U.S. They wanted to make this with our country, Hungary, just we resisted and fought back, just as we did on today too. Oh. Why is it not in the News? Because it's been controlled by the Jews too. They're weakening day by day. And Hungary is one of the country, which is resisting their spread, which is similar to a bad decease. Soon, they will be wiped out from those countries what they tried to ruin, including my one. I would suggest to do the same in the U.S. and restore the American Dream. Where the Jews are appearing and gaining control, that country will be doomed within 10 years. See just the current condition of the United States. Eight years ago it was the most powerful nation. Now... third level country. Thanks to AIPAC, thanks to your war for Israel. Wake up, guys!

[edit on 15-3-2008 by Dark Crystalline]






top topics



 
40
<< 2  3  4    6  7  8 >>

log in

join