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Depleted Uranium rekindled

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posted on Mar, 5 2008 @ 07:40 PM
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I've just been reading a thread which died off in 2005 about the US and other country's use of Depleted Uranium (DU) in ammunition stocks. There was much debate about its effects on the soliders using it and its longevity in the areas it is used.

Just as a little introduction for those who don't know all that much about DU, here it is:

Depleted uranium is a very heavy, non-fissive radioactive material; which means it can't be used in reactors for power since its radioactive isotopes are 'depleted'. Its particles are packed extremely close together, which causes its heaviness, thus why it's used in tank rounds. to pack enough punch to pierce a hull (wow, tongue twister anyone?). There's a large debate on whether it is dangerous to humans or whether it isn't. It's as simple as this. As itself, it's not nearly as dangerous as other elements, its radioactive signature is ALMOST negligible. But in this age this is still classed as too high.
Anyway, DU becomes as deadly as its non-depleted counterpart if it is either CUT or BURNED. bear this in mind.

I was watching a documentary about aeroplane construction (eg. Boeing 757), and in order to achieve lift, the plane obviously needs to balance out.

Wings: Engines either side including other little fancy bits and bobs to give stability while airborne.

Front end (Body): Passengers. What else is the plane for?

Rear end (Tail etc.): ... Now, what goes here? Along with much of the mechanical equipment, the fuel line is pumped into here. But would fuel and a few cogs be able to match the sheer weight imbalance of two wings with mounted engines (at a minimum) and 100+ people?

something very heavy, which takes up little room had to be implemented in order for the plane to take off in the first place, and this came in the form of Depleted Uranium. Even if it was dangerous to people in this state, it would still be too far from passengers and pilot and exposure would be too short to cause any significant body damage.

However. As with all man's devices, some fail. some catastrophically. Dodging all 9/11 conspiracies please, consider the WTC towers. If the two said planes did actually impact with the towers, then the DU contained on the plane was surely cooked off and/or split/broken. What sort of longterm widespread damage could this do to a city the size of New York?

Uranium and 747 briefs

Just a lil something to chew on
. And Remember, nuclear weapons arent just big bombs with a shark's face on the front




posted on Mar, 6 2008 @ 02:51 PM
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It's not just burning or cutting DU that is a problem.

When the DU penetration rod penetrates the target, a large part of the DU is turned into superfine dust. This dust is then breathed by humans and animals, and is lodged inside a person, where in the long term it will cause cancer in the same way asbestos causes cancer. However, in the short term, the radiation is more destructive, as the dust settles inside the person and affects both tissue and blood.

Iraq has seen many of the same medical problems that became common in ukraine and belorussia after the chernobyl incident, and so have parts of the former Yugoslavia. High rates of very specific types of cancer(thyroid cancer, certain types of blood cancer etc.)

Additionally, DU is used not only as counterweights in aircraft, but also for flywheels on carengines and in many other applications where a heavy weight is needed.



posted on Mar, 6 2008 @ 03:50 PM
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I wouldn't be too worried, there was so much crap in the air that a little DU probably isn't going to do to much more damage.



posted on Mar, 6 2008 @ 08:06 PM
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flywheels too? Wow, didn't know that one :S. I was aware of the fine powder, but the point of not worrying about DU because there is so much other crap in the air isn't the best point really. Breathing in DU powder would be like breathing fibreglass powder. It would shred the soft tissue of the inner lungs. Not to mention it is still Uranium
.

So what other common objects contain it? Not as serious, and I could be wrong, but doesn't the average car battery contain a sulphuric compound that gives off funky gasses when burned?



posted on Mar, 7 2008 @ 08:39 AM
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Originally posted by aaa2500
It's not just burning or cutting DU that is a problem.

When the DU penetration rod penetrates the target, a large part of the DU is turned into superfine dust. This dust is then breathed by humans and animals, and is lodged inside a person, where in the long term it will cause cancer in the same way asbestos causes cancer. However, in the short term, the radiation is more destructive, as the dust settles inside the person and affects both tissue and blood.

Iraq has seen many of the same medical problems that became common in ukraine and belorussia after the chernobyl incident, and so have parts of the former Yugoslavia. High rates of very specific types of cancer(thyroid cancer, certain types of blood cancer etc.)

Additionally, DU is used not only as counterweights in aircraft, but also for flywheels on carengines and in many other applications where a heavy weight is needed.


While I understand DU is used in aircraft ammunition specifcally with the A-10 warthog's gatling gun. DU is not used in car engines. I build engines and crankshafts are cut from steel. They use Iron to counterbalance the crankshaft.



posted on Mar, 7 2008 @ 08:49 AM
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Originally posted by aaa2500

Additionally, DU is used not only as counterweights in aircraft, but also for flywheels on carengines and in many other applications where a heavy weight is needed.


I am sorry but I can not believe that DU is used in car parts at all... infact fairly recently I had my skyline's flywheel exchanged for a performance low-weight flywheel and I have the old one in my shed, and it sure doesnt have even a microgram of DU in it.

Id love to see some links providing evidence to its use in car flywheels!!!

*edited because I found some sources on DU in 747s! - intresting fact i never knew! - but i still hold against the flywheel thing*

[edit on 7-3-2008 by freakyclown]



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