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Alien Spaceship(?) Shooting Plasma-Like Jets Near Saturn!!

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posted on Mar, 8 2008 @ 07:41 AM
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I would just like to state that I think this is an exceptional thread.

I starred it and flagged it last week but didn't respond cos this is totally way over my head...

Just wanted to praise the efforts here.





posted on Mar, 8 2008 @ 01:16 PM
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It's almost as if people don't read the entire thread. Of course they don't. But at least do yourself a favor and read posts on the last page where your reply is going to be.

The "jet" was already explained as lens flare. You'll see it every time this object enters or exits the camera's view.



posted on Mar, 8 2008 @ 05:33 PM
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k it might not be camera flare in my opinion (keep in mind im only 16)saturn is made up of gas so the ship could be refueling and those pics might be in reverse order then they should be so if u reverse the animation it might really be sucking up the gases thats my theory

[edit on 8-3-2008 by shadowjester]



posted on Mar, 8 2008 @ 09:00 PM
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reply to post by internos
 


Hey there Internos, congrats on your promotion!

Sorry for the confusion, I intended to compare the Tethys photos to this pic:


Both taken by Cassini, both imaging Tethys? Different distances of course, but still, you'd think Cassini would be able to resolve on an almost perfect sphere from such a measly distance, right?

Great posts yourself, I loved the idea to turn these images into gif animations, took the investigation to a whole new level, well done!

-WFA



posted on Mar, 8 2008 @ 09:15 PM
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Originally posted by Ionized
reply to post by WitnessFromAfar
 


It seems most are ignoring my post explaining that a possible cause for the dispersion and changing shape of the exit flare is due to the fact that the object was in orbital motion and effectively about to change direction just off the lens of the camera.


Now this is intereseting, and I apologize Ionized if I missed it.
I see what you mean, that since the object was in motion the 'ray' of lens flare could distort to show a 'blur' or imagined dispersal pattern.

I don't agree with this analysis though, as I understand it, the 'ray' is the flare effect, and we're talking about each frame at a time here. Even in motion, we would expect a ray. In fact, several of the examples pointed out before show this.


Originally posted by Ionized
Also, in this case the sun and the 'magic bullet' analysis doesn't apply, the sun isn't the source of the flare, the reflection of light from the moon is. You can treat the moon as a point source of light in this case, the angle of the sun relative to it makes no difference at all in this analysis. In fact I can't help but think that was thrown out as a distraction tactic.


I'm going to try my best not to take offense. I assure you I mean to distract nobody.

So let me get this straight, the 'moon/object' is glowing? Radiating it's own light? Sorry, I don't think so. ALL light in our solar system (excluding man-made lighting) comes from stars, MOST of that light comes from the Sun.

When you are looking at light from a moon, what you are actually seeing in light from the Sun bouncing off of the moon and hitting your retina, or the camera's lens.

My example was valid, and it had nothing to do with the angle of the sun hitting the 'moon/object'. It had to do with the power of the light hitting Cassini's lens.

Overexposure causes a flare, in this case we're talking about light originating at the Sun, bouncing off of Saturn, THEN bouncing off of the 'moon/object' and then travelling to the camera. This same 'moon/object' that DOES NOT flare the lens while the bright 'moon/object' is actually in the frame, but is supposed to somehow cause the flare upon exiting the frame?

Like I said, sounds a lot to me like Oswald's magic bullet.



Originally posted by Ionized
Also, you CAN see the flare from Saturn, it takes up a major portion of the image! It is the big white diffuse and striated looking area. It doesn't appear to change or move because with respect to the camera Saturn is stationary in the images it is centered at the bottom of the frame.

This image is the one that I am referencing:



I'll refer you to the work of MikeSingh above for your answers in this last section, as I feel you are addressing his explanation regarding lens flare from Saturn.



posted on Mar, 8 2008 @ 11:03 PM
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Originally posted by WitnessFromAfar
reply to post by internos
 

Sorry for the confusion, I intended to compare the Tethys photos to this pic:


Both taken by Cassini, both imaging Tethys? Different distances of course, but still, you'd think Cassini would be able to resolve on an almost perfect sphere from such a measly distance, right?

Great posts yourself, I loved the idea to turn these images into gif animations, took the investigation to a whole new level, well done!

-WFA

Thanks, WitnessFromAfar

Ok, here's what i know about this pic:
it has been posted here by jbecker: he referred to this website ( i don't know if it has been posted before that time):
The website in question mentions three pics from Cassini:

N00062208.jpg



N00062208.jpg was taken on May 23, 2006 and received on Earth May 24, 2006. The camera was pointing toward TETHYS at approximately 508,065 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters. This image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the NASA Planetary Data System in 2007.

saturn.jpl.nasa.gov...


N00061935.jpg


N00061935.jpg was taken on May 23, 2006 and received on Earth May 24, 2006. The camera was pointing toward TETHYS at approximately 508,727 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters. This image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the NASA Planetary Data System in 2007.

saturn.jpl.nasa.gov...


N00061934.jpg


N00061934.jpg was taken on May 23, 2006 and received on Earth May 24, 2006. The camera was pointing toward TETHYS at approximately 509,689 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters. This image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the NASA Planetary Data System in 2007.

saturn.jpl.nasa.gov...



Frankly, i don't know why they did put them in this order, anyway, i've made an animation with the three frames in question:



the framerate is 1:1 sec.

The anomaly is that the camera was pointing toward TETHYS, which is the bright moon that you see almost at the center of frames 1 and 2: but of course, frame 3 can't be a close-up of TETHYS since the background is unaltered (no zoom).

[edit on 8/3/2008 by internos]



posted on Mar, 8 2008 @ 11:54 PM
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Here's a web site, Digital Journal, that's referred this topic. But they've shown the wrong pic!! The 'gas jet' is the one they should have shown! But anyway they've linked ATS to it for the other pics!



Is big brother watching too?


Cheers!


www.digitaljournal.com...

[edit on 8-3-2008 by mikesingh]



posted on Mar, 9 2008 @ 12:04 AM
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reply to post by internos
 


What's behind that glare? Here's what the object looks like without it...



So that doesn't look like any moon of Saturn, what?




[edit on 9-3-2008 by mikesingh]



posted on Mar, 9 2008 @ 12:16 AM
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Originally posted by mikesingh
reply to
So that doesn't look like any moon of Saturn, what?


Mike: i swear that i have no idea what the heck is that one: i'm puzzled since the first time i've seen it.
THIS is Tethys, i don't know what the heck is that one ...


saturn.jpl.nasa.gov...

This time we may retrieve the calibrated image on NASA Planetary Data System. I'll check.

Mmm, i barely see something that looks like a cylinder:

but it's definately too hard to find out what really is there behind that glare... Honestly, i have no idea


[edit on 9/3/2008 by internos]



posted on Mar, 9 2008 @ 04:17 AM
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reply to post by mikesingh
 


I mentioned that around page 6 or 7



posted on Mar, 9 2008 @ 04:45 AM
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reply to post by mikesingh
 


Lol would have helped for them to put the right image up. You're topics go everywhere mike
you gonna email them and let them know its the wrong photo?

/rich


[edit on 9-3-2008 by olegkvasha]



posted on Mar, 9 2008 @ 05:48 AM
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reply to post by internos
 


I can't help but see an upside down gray's head in the second image. Something about it is just odd though, one must admit.

I'm really beginning to wonder if there's NOT something going on out by Saturn right now. When/If Cassini disappears mysteriously, this will come back to haunt NASA, I think.

TheBorg



posted on Mar, 9 2008 @ 06:23 AM
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reply to post by internos
 


I think the distances shed some light on this:

This is Tethys at: 1,721,988 kilometers



This is Tethys at: 797,080 kilometers



This is Tethys at: 185,576 kilometers



Now look at the 3 images in question. According to the data on the site Tethys is approximately 508,065 kilometers away. However Tethys is NOT visible in the image at all. Imo Tethy is actually off to the right hand side of the image.

The image im talking about:


Notice the light coming in from the right?

Now lets look at the image with the anomaly in it:



In this image Tethys is meant to be at approximately 509,689 however this time Tethy has re-appeared (marked in the red circle):



My only question now is why was tethy not in the 1st 2 images.


/rich


[edit on 9-3-2008 by olegkvasha]

[edit on 9-3-2008 by olegkvasha]



posted on Mar, 9 2008 @ 06:39 AM
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reply to post by olegkvasha
 

Have a star!

Good work, as always olegkvasha!
This clarifies conclusively that Tethys is much bigger than all the bodies that we see in the two images not containig the anomaly.
The only possible explanation is that Tethys should be somewhere in the third one, the one with the anomaly. So pheraps what looks to be a cylinder may be a sphere.

Now, i'm trying to retrieve the calibrated image from NASA Planetary Data System



posted on Mar, 9 2008 @ 06:59 AM
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Could it be an asteroid or a comet? (the last pic we're on about) Just thinking that it might explain the shape,as it looks like it's moving quite fast.



posted on Mar, 9 2008 @ 07:04 AM
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reply to post by Acidtastic
 


Im looking into that at the moment. However I would say its more likely to be another moon on a closer orbit that goes infront of tethy.

/rich



posted on Mar, 9 2008 @ 08:44 AM
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reply to post by olegkvasha
 


Well analysed olegkvasha!!
A star for you! Let's see what internos comes up with. We've got to get to the bottom of this mystery. Now what if it is a camera glitch? Some g-ray particles playing havoc on the lens? Seems unlikely though. Can a million dollar camera produce such anomalies especially with clear filters? My $1 pin hole camera would probably do better!!



Originally posted by olegkvasha
Lol would have helped for them to put the right image up. You're topics go everywhere mike
you gonna email them and let them know its the wrong photo?
/rich



Forget it rich! I got better things to do ...like admire your sexy avatar!! Lol!


Cheers!


[edit on 9-3-2008 by mikesingh]



posted on Mar, 9 2008 @ 09:28 AM
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Originally posted by mikesingh
reply to post by olegkvasha
 


Forget it rich! I got better things to do ...like admire your sexy avatar!! Lol!


Cheers!




You like it
I drew her myself in good old photoshop.

/rich



posted on Mar, 9 2008 @ 09:48 AM
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I haven't got the time to read the whole thread but i take it the conclusion in the end was the 'jet' we see from the object is merely an optical effect as it certainly appears to be in this video, you can see the jet like effect only happens when it's just out of frame on both bottom and top, not to mention the constant optical effect seen from the stationary object.



posted on Mar, 9 2008 @ 09:49 AM
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Originally posted by mikesingh
Forget it rich! I got better things to do ...like admire your sexy avatar!! Lol!


[offtopic]
Yeah, really sexy, indeed.
Every time that i have to read one of olegkvasha's posts, i must cover the avatar with my left hand because if i don't do so, there's no way to stay focused on the post, heck!

[/offtopic]


I've found the RAW images on NASA Planetary Data System:
They can be downloade here:
www.megafileupload.com...
Now at least we know also the exposure time:

START_TIME = 2006-143T05:10:58.352
STOP_TIME = 2006-143T05:14:38.352
Three minutes, 50 seconds.





1. Calibration Software
Calibration software is available on the COISS_0011 volume. The
entire volume can be downloaded by right clicking here
(.tar.gz format).
The volume contains a collection of calibration data files, calibration software processing files, sample calibrated images and related documentation. It also contains the source code for the Imaging Science Subsystem Calibration (CISSCAL) software, located in the EXTRAS subdirectory. This software, developed by the Cassini Imaging Team, allows the user to radiometrically and geometrically process the EDR-level images into higher level calibrated images. See the CISSCAL manual,

DOCUMENT/CISSCAL_MANUAL.PDF or

DOCUMENT/CISSCAL_MANUAL.TEX,, for more information.
For links to the complete calibration data set, see ISS Calibration).



pds-rings.seti.org...

HUGE file.

ED:
Ah, you'll need NASAVIEW in order to view the images

it can be found here
pds.nasa.gov...
make sure that all the .img images and the labels are located in the same directory, and when asked to choose the (filename).lbl as label, hit "Yes" button.

[edit on 9/3/2008 by internos]





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