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Scientists Measure What It Takes to Push a Single Atom

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posted on Feb, 27 2008 @ 07:43 PM
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Scientists Measure What It Takes to Push a Single Atom


Just 17 piconewtons, or 60 trillionths of an ounce, is the force it takes to push a cobalt atom across a copper surface. This is one of the findings of a group of IBM scientists who have been testing a new kind of atomic force microscope (AFM), which has made the first measurements of the force required to move an individual atom.


The ability to move atoms, with precision, provides very exciting new possibilities when considered in the field of nanotech.

yes, they have done atomic level precision work before, but there are no models on the exact force needed to alter the location of individual atoms.



MBF

posted on Feb, 27 2008 @ 10:30 PM
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Somebody has a lot of spare time on their hands don't they.
Ok, now I have two lines.



posted on Feb, 27 2008 @ 10:34 PM
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This is a bigger breakthrough than a lot of people will realize until we start seeing the amazing nanotech.


MBF

posted on Feb, 27 2008 @ 10:41 PM
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I can see where it can be useful in nanotech. I think nanotech is going to be very huge very soon.



posted on Feb, 27 2008 @ 11:04 PM
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Man I wish I got paid huge amounts of money to sit around all day and try and figure out how to push something really really small.



posted on Feb, 27 2008 @ 11:10 PM
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Originally posted by MBF
Somebody has a lot of spare time on their hands don't they.
Ok, now I have two lines.


What do you mean?

The benefits, at least for the most part for what is already identified, are fairly well covered in the article. The ability to build things from an atomic level will also provide access to different properties of the same minerals we currently have.

Here is a link discussing how being able to build reliably structured 3-d nano models increases capability

the benefits of nano are limitless. The ability to provide for a human like circulatory system, complete with individual nano's that each perform separate tasks (healing, lubing, delivery of various minterals, etc) is a current reality.

Someone posted a link about self healing rubber. Yes, that is quite the breakthrough. Can you imagine the implications?

A mutual friend of myself and a few others here sent this email:



The February 1, 2008 edition of the journal Science includes a brief article focusing on the futuristic sounding topic of Adaptive Composites. Richard Vaia and Jeffery Baur write that materials are now under development that can respond dynamically to changes in their environment. Concepts such as suppleness to squeeze through crevices, aircraft skin that regulates temperature and self-healing composites are now being studied. These ideas go beyond the idea of advanced composites and into the field of adaptive composites. This same focus in materials science are "driving the development of adaptive composites that mimic biological responsive functionality while operating in extreme environments." Today's design includes ideas of "structural efficiency" with "active functions such as sensing, energy harvesting and propulsion are added by attaching components to the structure." But changes may be on the way soon.
Currently "advanced passive material technologies such as continuous-fiber organic-matrix composites" are used in various applications. New innovations are aiming to incorporate "flexible, jointed frameworks and complex materials [that] impart active functionality at multiple length scales within the materials." This requires synthetics that combine materials that have active properties, autonomic response and "new computational tools that enable design, analysis and optimization of the collective and hierarchical dynamic character." The aerospace industry seems to be most interested in the "transformation of rigid substructure to a dynamic, articulated structure." Uses include "large-scale antennae in space and the development of morphing wings on unmanned aerial vehicles."
Other goals include "energy-efficient locomotion and concealment" which are top priorities. By mimicking organisms it is hoped that "highly deformable networks can be created from cellular materials, bistable composite laminates and bimorph strips." It is also hoped that using CNTs(carbon nanotubes) will be incorporated into mats and arrays that stress energy can be stored and recovered. From all appearances the greatest hurdle is not the lack of constituents for material composites but a real need for better and more "streamlined computational design tools that capture the properties of the many possible configurations or states." The complexity in coupling multiple active materials with evolutionary, emergent and morphogenic attributes is with not an obstacle. Indeed it remains only a challenge yet to be fulfilled. Some real challenges do include weakness at interfaces, bonding and reverse flexibility.
The contributors Vaia and Baur say that elegant outlines have been proposed in earnest since 2004. They also believe utilization of micro- and nano-robotics as well as fluidics will also contribute much to these novel adaptive materials. In these two ideas we not only face the challenge of design but also that of durability.



A Google search of "Adaptive Composites". If you actually follow links, this will blow your mind.

www.google.com...

Yes, we are on the verge of something great. If we don't kill ourselves first.

Perhaps a separate thread should be made to cover adaptive composite discoveries. This is actually the advent of such technology as self healing ship skins, reactive/responsive hulls and other parts. Imagine the telemetry available when you have constant feedback being provided via nano"circuits" full of nano's in a fluidic suspension.


MBF

posted on Feb, 27 2008 @ 11:59 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


This should just be a simple calculation, but it is made to look like some big threshold has been crossed. No disrespect to nanotech was ever intended.



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