It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Giant "Sea Monster" Fossil Discovered in Arctic

page: 1
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 26 2008 @ 08:18 PM
link   
this is pretty cool, sounds like nessy to me

scientists continue to find new stuff all the time. imagine coming face to face with this sucker...


A massive ancient sea reptile that was longer than a humpback whale and had teeth the size of cucumbers has been found by fossil hunters on a remote Arctic island.

Link to Story

what do you guys think?




posted on Feb, 26 2008 @ 11:46 PM
link   
hmmmm.. i think it would be eaier to make a conclusion if there was a picture of what they found

u should try finding one. i'll try too



posted on Feb, 26 2008 @ 11:59 PM
link   
ok all i could find was pictures of the fossil outlined in rocks. it's still not enough for me o believe in it but i thing it's possible we'll see if they can come up with more pics at a later date

check out this site
www.greendiary.com...



posted on Feb, 27 2008 @ 02:45 PM
link   
reply to post by kklover
 


thanks for the link!
im sure as time goes on, there will be plenty of pics provided.



posted on Feb, 27 2008 @ 08:39 PM
link   
National Geographic found the fossils of a large 150 million year old plesiosaur. I don't see what's to believe and not to believe about that. Nothing in the article says that it's still living today. Nor do I see any connection to Nessie. Interesting article, but am I missing something?



posted on Feb, 27 2008 @ 08:55 PM
link   
reply to post by Paresthesia
 


i think kklover was a bit confused. but, i made the connection to nessy as a joke, because the animal found is thought to be a plesiosaur, which many seem to think that is what nessy is.

missing anything else?



posted on Feb, 27 2008 @ 09:07 PM
link   
reply to post by Paresthesia
 



That image looks little like a pleisiosaur. It looks more like a gator (after taking some of Barry Bonds special formula).

Nothing like nessie, either. No long neck. It has a short neck. Nessie was a laprosaur. (yeah, i mispell dinosaur names....sue me
)


[edit on 27-2-2008 by bigfatfurrytexan]



posted on Feb, 27 2008 @ 09:16 PM
link   
reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


whether either animal is a plesiosaur is a different question, and im not sure that we'll ever find out was nessy really was, but im almost positive that she is not an elephant, as discussed on a thread here at ATS...



posted on Feb, 27 2008 @ 09:39 PM
link   
There were two main groups of pelsiosaurs, ones with long necks, and ones with short necks that looked like gators or crocs. The ones with the short necks are in adiffernet family, called the Pliosauridae family. Nasty buggers to.



posted on Feb, 28 2008 @ 12:43 AM
link   
BBC's interpretation of what a Croc with a 10 foot skull looks like
First picture is a Dino thats ten foot long, Second picture is Mr Croc
eating 10 foot Dinosaur.

By eagle1229 at 2008-02-27
Mr Croc

By eagle1229 at 2008-02-27

Temporal fluctuations caused pixelization
"I ran outa Time"

[edit on 28-2-2008 by Eagle1229]

[edit on 28-2-2008 by Eagle1229]

[edit on 28-2-2008 by Eagle1229]



posted on Feb, 28 2008 @ 01:22 AM
link   
reply to post by Eagle1229
 


That's not from Disney. That's a Discovery channel show. I used to have a book with pics from it. Disney would have them being friends and going on unlikely adventures.



posted on Feb, 28 2008 @ 01:55 AM
link   
reply to post by RuneSpider
 
True not Disney but BBC "Walking with Dinosaurs"
I have the whole 5 seconds in WMV but imageshack only wants SWF
looks better in motion



[edit on 28-2-2008 by Eagle1229]



posted on Feb, 29 2008 @ 02:18 AM
link   
Wow just imagine the power of its jaws though. I can't wait to see what this beast would be capable of. Maybe we should start looking in the artic and antartic more? longer than a humpback Sheesh i wonder what it had to eat to stay alive?



posted on Feb, 29 2008 @ 03:32 PM
link   
reply to post by Semoro
 
Mr Croc likely ate Dino's and Fish until Dino's bit the dust
then switched to Sashimi as mammals only inches long wouldn't even get caught between its teeth.
Mr Croc scientific name whatacrocasaurus
It's hard to tell from the fossil if it shows a Tyranodile or a Crocasaurus
like a Tion or Liger, can ya imagine the environmental pressures leading up to a Crocodile and a Tyranosaur producing a Tyranodile or a Crocasaurus?

There are two ways to look at Wow WhataCroc or Geez WhataCroc!!
needed a little humor please ignore if it's not ok to bash extinct vertibrates.



posted on Mar, 1 2008 @ 12:30 AM
link   
lol do you guys remember impossible creatures? lol imagine a flying shark hehe evil...

Deny Ignorance

Semoro



posted on Mar, 1 2008 @ 12:43 AM
link   
reply to post by Semoro
 


He ate prett ymuch anything smaller than him probably. He may have ignored his own species, but beyond that, there were plenty of other marine reptiles for him to feast on. It's not really likely he fed on dinosaurs, not many of them probably went swimming.



posted on Mar, 1 2008 @ 09:05 PM
link   
Hmmm I think marine reptiles would be the best choice but dinosaurs were probably targetted by juviniles and really really hungry and grumpy swimming lizards hehe

Deny Ignorance

Semoro



posted on Mar, 1 2008 @ 09:17 PM
link   
The thing had flippers instead of feet and legs. it couldn't get on land, how would it feed on dinosaurs. These things, like whales, probably had to stay in the water. Or it would have been crushed under it's own weight.



posted on Mar, 2 2008 @ 07:04 PM
link   
reply to post by RuneSpider
 

Not all Super-Crocs had flippers, Actually flippers are more a perogative of the artist than the paleontologist Here is an artistic interpretaion of a Super Croc Nothosaurus

By eagle1229 at 2008-03-02

By eagle1229 at 2008-03-02
Caption says stayed mainly in the water but those flippers look alot like legs to me
What I find TRUELY AMAZING is this serendipidous attribution to a paleontologist at Columbus State University I checked its not a April 1st article news.nationalgeographic.com...
David Schwimmer, a paleontologist at Columbus State University in Georgia, said he was familiar with Sereno's discovery and was "thrilled with it" because it helps fill in the picture of giant crocs, which appeared repeatedly in evolutionary history. Schwimmer is an expert on a giant croc genus named Deinosuchus, which was prevalent in North America.

If one remembers TV show "Friends" there is a fantastic cooincidence





[edit on 2-3-2008 by Eagle1229]



posted on Mar, 2 2008 @ 11:03 PM
link   
Ok, but that's a ancient croc, not the same as the critter from the article. The critter in the article had no feet, just flippers. They are a different species.

That said, croc were ambush hunters, no matter the size, so they could have fed on whatever dino's went by the water.

It is likely though that plesiusaurs and their relatives went on land to lay eggs, since unlike the icthyosaurs there is no evidence to support them birthing live young. Though whether they sought out dinosaurs is unlikely, since they were adapted to hunting in the oceans.



new topics

top topics



 
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join