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Venus Flytrap native only to N. Carolina, in a meteor impact crater. Aliens from another planet?

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posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 11:56 AM
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Venus Flytrap native only to N. Carolina, in a meteor impact crater. Aliens from another planet?


I heard the Venus Flytrap grows native only in a small part of North Carolina in the impact crater from a meteor? I thought the story was a bit out there but very interesting. It’s weird, the Venus Flytrap, an ominous looking carnivorous plant, does look like something from another planet. It’s absolutely true that it only grows natively in one area of the world and it’s N. Carolina. The only thing special I could find about the area is the soil, its very nitrogen rich. I couldn’t find anything about an old impact crater. Has anyone heard this story before? If you look at the evidence it is possible. Plant seeds are very resilient and can last a very long time, hence the doomsday seed bank that’s getting built. Could spores, seeds, whatever, stand up to the hard conditions of space? If the seeds were incased in ice or something it could have protected them from the extreme hot and cold.

Possibly evidence of alien life is in plain sight, a novelty gift bought in grocery stores for fascinated little five year olds to bring into school for show and tell. If you asked me two days ago where the Venus Flytrap came from, I would have said the Amazon, somewhere exotic. I grew up in New England which is not to far from the Carolina’s, and your not going to find much exotic foliage; to me the Flytrap is out of this world.


Wikipedia






posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 12:03 PM
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Highly unlikely but still remotely possible. Nevertheless, the article *did* mention that a population of these plants in North Florida may be natives.



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 12:07 PM
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just did some quick googling, and i was surprised to find that you were correct that they are indigenous to north/south carolina. there are of course other carnivorous plants scattered around the world, so the only thing i find odd is that it's localized to such a small area.

[edit on 20-2-2008 by an0maly33]



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 12:15 PM
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reply to post by an0maly33
 


Don't forget the North Florida population. Nevertheless...I do know that extraterrestrial impacts can leave minerals in the soil, perhaps that happened with this impact, creating an environment within which these unique plants can thrive.



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 12:19 PM
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i'm certainly not discrediting that possibility. i just don't know what to make of it. =)



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by jojoKnowsBest
 


I'd love to believe that the VF was of alien origin, but there are other carnivorous plants scattered across the globe as well.


Darlingtonia californica : Native to Northern California
en.wikipedia.org...

Drosera capensis : Native to S. Africa
en.wikipedia.org...

Pinguicula gigantea : Native to Mexico
en.wikipedia.org...


I'm no botanist but I'd imagine that plants with these specialized systems must only thrive in certain conditions, explaining the limited areas they appear in the wild.



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by jojoKnowsBest
 


interesting idea, but the ET hypothesis predicts that it would be genetically distinct from any other plant in the world, standing in its own taxonomic kingdom. I'm no expert on plant genetics, but this doesn't appear to be the case.



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 12:27 PM
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disownedsky: that's what i was thinking, but i do agree that some meteorite crash could have provided conditions for this plant to thrive.



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 12:28 PM
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Hey I live in NC. They only place I know they grow is in a state park at Carolina Beach, NC. It's not a big park so the impact crater thing may be true. It is very close to the ocean and sound - so sandy soil and salty water.

Little Shop of Horrors comes to mind, "Feeeeeed Me"!



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 12:28 PM
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reply to post by disownedsky
 


Indeed...another good question is "what evolutionary ancestors did the plant have and where were they located?" The answers should be pretty easy to find but I'm just to lazy to do a search right now.



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 12:32 PM
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There are numerous examples of specific instances of flora and fauna that are found only in limited geographical areas.

In other words....why is this Venus Flytrap special?



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 12:39 PM
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Though the Venus Flytrap is unique to a particular area of the Carolinas and North Florida, it isn't an invader from another world. It is related to other plants found throughout the world, in the family Droseraceae. This particular family of plants has existed for some 100 million years.



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 12:43 PM
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I'm even more confused....the "Earth Impact Database" doesn't show an impact site in N. Carolina...



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 01:17 PM
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I know someone who claimed that it also grew in remote regions of Virginia. Apparently some people in Virginia know where they grow. But the information is not shared lightly, as the species is very delicate and relies on very specific habitat. The thought amongst the secret keepers is that if they had too many visitors, or even worse-hunters, they would disappear for good. Therefore, I would say that with more investigation you will discover that they grow in at least several remote locations. These locations are generally wet soils in the North Carolina area. There are many remote "Hollers" where they might grow.

[edit on 20-2-2008 by Ectoterrestrial]



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 01:42 PM
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There are other carnivorous plants world wide as well.

Carnivorous Plant Fact

I remember when I was a kid you could order one from a comic book. They'd mail it in a cardboard box. I think they sell them at Carolina beach.



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by jojoKnowsBest
 


I believe the Carolinas in the U.S.A. are also the only location to find the stone called Unakite. I have a rosary from North Carolina that is made of polished unakite stones that are absolutely gorgeous. Also, being home to the Cherokee people, I wonder what other secrets are hidden in North Carolina.



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by Pellevoisin
 


We have the largest saphire deposits in our mountains as well.

Plus Gomer Pyle and Barney Fife



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by Pellevoisin
 


The Cherokee are actually thought to have originated in the Great Lakes area.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by chromatico
 


There were a ton of them here, then they were led out West in what is known as the Trail of Tears, 1000s died on the march to the western reservation.

Basically part of the great American genocide. IMO we were no better than the Nazis in what we did to them.

Well they have a casino in the NC mountains now - stcking it back to the man I guess.



posted on Feb, 20 2008 @ 03:04 PM
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If it starts eating people and breaking into songs, then you might wanna keep distance... or change careers.






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