Big Engined Cars

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posted on Feb, 6 2008 @ 05:38 PM
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I know we all like to say the yanks drive big engine gas gusslers but here in the UK there seems to be a revival of 5 and 6 litre engined vehicles, does that really make any sense given the cost of running such vehicles and while we point the finger of global warming at America what would Americans drive if they did not have access to such large vehicles.

Would they go for hybrid cars, small tiny vehices, electric cars, those are becoming more popular in the UK but I cannot see them really working in the US or Canada, basically any large country as such vehicles have limited range or require specialist fuels, any thoughts.




posted on Feb, 6 2008 @ 06:01 PM
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From my perspective here in the Great American Desert Southwest; the big SUV, pickup truck is so ingrained in the psyche of the Western male, that even if petrol was $20 a gal., they would deny their children food and shoes to continue to drive their vehicle of choice. I drive a mid sized pickup and I can see the drivers of behemoths, sneer down at me when stopped for a red light. The macho image is alive and well. I never felt so special as when I owned a XJ12 Jag. 5.5 ltr.



posted on Feb, 25 2008 @ 03:55 AM
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Originally posted by magicmushroom
I know we all like to say the yanks drive big engine gas gusslers but here in the UK there seems to be a revival of 5 and 6 litre engined vehicles, does that really make any sense given the cost of running such vehicles and while we point the finger of global warming at America what would Americans drive if they did not have access to such large vehicles.

Would they go for hybrid cars, small tiny vehices, electric cars, those are becoming more popular in the UK but I cannot see them really working in the US or Canada, basically any large country as such vehicles have limited range or require specialist fuels, any thoughts.


Hi, car freak here...I even race cars with local car clubs such as the Porsche Club of America, etc...so I burn lots of fossil fuel. My insight into this is, I went to school in London for a year on an exchange program wayyy back in '85...all of your cars I saw were small, very good on gas mileage, and from a geographical and economic standpoint that was perfect for the times with you guys, gas was outrageous by the litre for you all, so I can understand why the majority of your cars were small, slow and fuel efficient. You all can drive 300 km's and pass through 3 countries on 1/2 tank of gas...here in the US, we have paid low prices per gallon for what you all have had to, BUT we have to commute HUGE distances in a shorter amount of time...Heck you can drive 3,000 miles here and not hit each coast on how many gallons of fuel? With the exception of NY, Chicago, LA and Boston, we have no "tubes" and we like our speed and our big engines...just my two cents.



posted on Jun, 13 2008 @ 12:38 PM
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Here is something you small engine guys can think about; People think a small engine gets better mileage, and big engines are gas hogs. that is not always true. Follow me here...a small 4 cylinder in a small car works 100% of it's available power to drive the car with it's human load, while a V-8 uses maybe 1/2 of it's available power to do the same thing. The car companies are lying to you, they say cars gets 32-40 miles per gallon, right? One of my first cars was a 1960 Plymouth Valiant, it had a slant 6 three speed manual, and it got 48 mpg every day. I have have many cars, including "hot rods" that got 35 mpg, and some that got better. It's all in the ignition.
Modern cars do not have high performance ignition systems on them, that have factory ignitions, read that cheap parts, and what you need is a digital system, like the ones made by MSD, coupled with a high output coil, 42,000 V or better, low resistance good quality primary wires, and a good set of plugs will do wonders for any vehicle. Breathing is crucial too, a good, free flowing induction is paramount. there are many brands of air cleaners.



posted on Jun, 13 2008 @ 03:37 PM
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Very true autowrench.

My old Ford falcon 6, got a solid 40mpg. and my 65 302 mustang got 30mpg.

and my 280SL 4spd. gets close to 30mpg being driven by a maniac. ME

Hot plugs and wires work.

With gas being what it is, after mkt. upgrades, make it cost effective, now more than ever.

[edit on 13-6-2008 by whaaa]



posted on Jun, 13 2008 @ 03:50 PM
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What is this ignition you speak of?

Real engines don't need spark plugs... Or wires and coils... And real engines are far more economical and efficient...

Diesel Monkeys, not just for riding off in a cloud of black smoke anymore...



posted on Jun, 13 2008 @ 08:14 PM
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I mean like this one:

Mallory Hyfire 6-Series Digital Ignition Systems

or this one:

MSD 6-Series Ignition

Get them here:/5sraom (Jeggs High Performance)
Money well spent, even for crank triggered ignition systems. Three sparks for every cycle, and digital control, works with any car computer system, and fires a more powerful coil, such as this one:
MSD HVC-2 Coil The HVC-2 Coil produces 48,000 volts at a stout 2-amps with only .016 ohms of primary resistance. When you send that kind of voltage to your spark plugs, you burn ALL the gas, not just the 20-30% you are burning now, with a stock system. What do you think a catalytic converter is for? To catch all that wasted gasoline.


XL5

posted on Jul, 23 2008 @ 05:15 PM
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I hope you didn't mean 48,000volts at 2amps...thats 96,000watts, 128horsepower! 48,000 x 2=96,000, 96,000/746=128. If you meant 48,000volts output at 2amps/13volts input, I'd say thats close to the stock ignition system.

A higher voltage in your ignition system does not burn more gas, a longer high voltage pulse duration may burn more gas and or a spark with more current (not voltage). If you have the correct air/fuel mixture at the spark, it really doesn't matter how many volts it is, your spark plug gap and the 2000-5000ohm ignition wires matter alot more. The more currnet in the spark, the hotter/fatter it is, the longer the spark plug wires are the less current you will have, they are not normal copper wires, they have alot of resistance. The larger your spark plug gap is, the less "resistance" it has to the amount of voltage going through it, a larger gap can have more voltage going through it for a given amount of current.

Dyno results or it doesn't work.



posted on Sep, 9 2008 @ 08:51 AM
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Ignition boosters, Low resistance plug wires and colder than stock, copper core spark plugs work very well to increase gas mileage. This combined with a freer flowing intake and exhaust allows you to advance the timing for even more increase in low end torque without pinging You can also use a lower temperature thermostat, lower viscosity synthetic oil and change your heavy stock cooling fan to a lighter flex fan on engines with belt driven fans. If you have a late model car with computerized engine management installing a performance module, chip or programmer will actually give you more mpgs as well as horsepower as long as you can control your right foot. I have done all but the fan but with the addition of an over sized automatic transmission cooler on a 97 GMC Safari van with a 3.43 to 1 rear end and get 18 to 22 mpg and a big increase in power. Also the same minus the Malory box on a 95 GMC pickup with 3.73 to 1 rear end with 5 speed manual and it gets a consistent 18 to 19.5 mpg. The van has port injection and the timing cannot be be adjusted at the distributor. The pickup has throttle body injection and can be timed with a strobe light. Both have 4.3 V6 engines and will out run similar vehicles with stock 350 cubic inch V8s. The best mileage per gallon vehicle I ever owned was an 82 VW Rabbit Diesel 5 speed. I cut off the front of the intake side of the air cleaner box and had a larger exhaust pipe, glass pack, and tailpipe installed. It got 54.7 mpgs. It had an extremely low frequency intake and exhaust drone that would set off car alarms when driven at mid RPMs in shopping mall parking lots.



posted on Nov, 17 2008 @ 08:34 AM
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I have a Land Rover with a small V8 4.6,and that thing guzzles gas,although I must admit I have big 33 in tires on it,but I try to stay light on the peddle I get 9.9 mpg going downhill,on the other extreme I have a Scion XB 1st gen and I can get 39 mpg on fwy,but I must admit in the Land Rover you have a feel of invicibility,it can be driven anywhere even up to 30 in of water on Scion have a cold air intake and Borla exhaust,some with Rover





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