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Forbidden Egyptology

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posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 12:09 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
The age old problem (well about hundred and fifty years) How far do you go?

Many of these structures are on limestone or other bed rock. those that are not have tended to disintegrate.

Egypt is one of the best documented an explored areas in the world. Its been looked at extensively for over 200 years.

As of the moment only part of the enclosure of the Sphinx is thought to (maybe) older than thought.

We'll get a better picture in 10-15 years as the various field surveys are completed and the reports come in.

But at the present time nada on unknown civiizations.

Ok, but I thought I heard that some of the structures they have uncovered have no inscriptions. Are somewhat plain? Didn't they write on just about everything they built? Now I am in a place I know very little. I am better at "what if" thinking.




posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 12:21 AM
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It may have been and probably was after the domestication of sheep around 10000 BP.

But the storage of large amounts of grain and cooking requires a pottery vessel that can withstand wet and rodents. The story of the move from pre-pottery neolithic to the pottery neolithic is one of the fundamental movements of civilization.




Cheese

Cheese is an ancient food whose origins predate recorded history. There is no conclusive evidence indicating where cheesemaking originated, either in Europe, Central Asia or the Middle East, but the practice had spread within Europe prior to Roman times and, according to Pliny the Elder, had become a sophisticated enterprise by the time the Roman Empire came into being.

Proposed dates for the origin of cheesemaking range from around 8000 BCE (when sheep were first domesticated) to around 3000 BCE. The first cheese may have been made by people in the Middle East or by nomadic Turkic tribes in Central Asia. Since animal skins and inflated internal organs have, since ancient times, provided storage vessels for a range of foodstuffs, it is probable that the process of cheese making was discovered accidentally by storing milk in a container made from the stomach of an animal, resulting in the milk being turned to curd and whey by the rennet from the stomach. There is a widely-told legend about the discovery of cheese by an Arab trader who used this method of storing milk. The legend has many individual variations.[3][4]

Cheesemaking may also have begun independent of this by the pressing and salting of curdled milk in order to preserve it. Observation that the effect of making milk in an animal stomach gave more solid and better-textured curds, may have led to the deliberate addition of rennet.

The earliest archaeological evidence of cheesemaking has been found in Egyptian tomb murals, dating to about 2000 BCE.[5] The earliest cheeses were likely to have been quite sour and salty, similar in texture to rustic cottage cheese or feta, a crumbly, flavorful Greek cheese.

Cheese produced in Europe, where climates are cooler than the Middle East, required less aggressive salting for preservation. In conditions of less salt and acidity, the cheese became a suitable environment for a variety of beneficial microbes and molds, which are what give aged cheeses their pronounced and interesting flavors. Cheese has become the most popular milk invention.



From the wiki

Cheese



posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 12:24 AM
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reply to post by seagrass
 


Howdy Seagrass

The Egyptians built with wood intially and turned to stone during the first dynasties. The first stone was often cut to resemble wood.

Somebuildings were plastered, painted on or had internal wood panels (as did the Giza pyramids) all of this has been lost.



posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 12:33 AM
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But if we are talking about forbidden AE then


I have never liked the term "Forbidden AE". Who is forbidding the passing on of knowledge of AE? Can't really blame Hawass as there were a couple of hundred years of discoveries before he came on the scene. Everything else that had become known prior to him couldn't be "put back in the bottle" as it were.




what could be discovered is speculated as not to exist before it has even been tryed.


I have to disagree with you. Much of what has been "speculated" as what COULD be discovered is more often than not presented as if it is already a well known fact, despite lack of evidence and lack of context to the times being discussed.

To reiterate what Hanslune said, "How far do you go"?

Should Egypt let every Tom, Dick and Harry in to dig until they find what they are looking for or permanently destroy everything they are digging around or under? How do you hold them accountable if they leave in the middle of the night after causing much destruction?

cormac



posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 12:34 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
It may have been and probably was after the domestication of sheep around 10000 BP.

But the storage of large amounts of grain and cooking requires a pottery vessel that can withstand wet and rodents. The story of the move from pre-pottery neolithic to the pottery neolithic is one of the fundamental movements of civilization.




Cheese

Cheese is an ancient food whose origins predate recorded history. There is no conclusive evidence indicating where cheesemaking originated, either in Europe, Central Asia or the Middle East, but the practice had spread within Europe prior to Roman times and, according to Pliny the Elder, had become a sophisticated enterprise by the time the Roman Empire came into being.

Proposed dates for the origin of cheesemaking range from around 8000 BCE (when sheep were first domesticated) to around 3000 BCE. The first cheese may have been made by people in the Middle East or by nomadic Turkic tribes in Central Asia. Since animal skins and inflated internal organs have, since ancient times, provided storage vessels for a range of foodstuffs, it is probable that the process of cheese making was discovered accidentally by storing milk in a container made from the stomach of an animal, resulting in the milk being turned to curd and whey by the rennet from the stomach. There is a widely-told legend about the discovery of cheese by an Arab trader who used this method of storing milk. The legend has many individual variations.[3][4]

Cheesemaking may also have begun independent of this by the pressing and salting of curdled milk in order to preserve it. Observation that the effect of making milk in an animal stomach gave more solid and better-textured curds, may have led to the deliberate addition of rennet.

The earliest archaeological evidence of cheesemaking has been found in Egyptian tomb murals, dating to about 2000 BCE.[5] The earliest cheeses were likely to have been quite sour and salty, similar in texture to rustic cottage cheese or feta, a crumbly, flavorful Greek cheese.

Cheese produced in Europe, where climates are cooler than the Middle East, required less aggressive salting for preservation. In conditions of less salt and acidity, the cheese became a suitable environment for a variety of beneficial microbes and molds, which are what give aged cheeses their pronounced and interesting flavors. Cheese has become the most popular milk invention.



From the wiki

Cheese

stop that, you are making me hungry.



posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 12:41 AM
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"Should Egypt let every Tom, Dick and Harry in to dig until they find what they are looking for or permanently destroy everything they are digging around or under? How do you hold them accountable if they leave in the middle of the night after causing much destruction? "

I for one, would never want to ruin the Sphinx, but since they have found tunnels and rooms with equipment, you would think that they would go to any length to uncover and explore it. But yes, I would expect them to do everything possible to preserve the Sphinx in the process. Just think what they might find. More knowledge or artifacts. Or unpainted hallways.



posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 12:51 AM
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Just think what they might find. More knowledge or artifacts. Or unpainted hallways.


Or just as likely, more limestone.

I am not against unobtrusive or even minimally obtrusive investigations. However, as I mentioned in a thread a while back, I firmly believe that there are those who will not stop with their investigations until they have either found what they are looking for or irreparably damaged the structures/areas they are investigating.

Even then, if they don't find what they are looking for they will more than likely claim conspiracy instead of admitting they were wrong.

cormac



posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 01:50 AM
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Hey if they are going to blame Hawass they need to hurry up I heard a rumor he's going to retire in less than two years.

The next guy is even gonna be worse, bigger and meaner - leaving Egypt and searching out pseudoscientists, pyramidiots, common idiots, Doctors of Woo and brainless new age reporters and putting them to the lash and making them eat large bowls of cool greasy Foul (if you've been to the land of Misr you'll know what foul is)

See you guys in a few weeks.



posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 06:12 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 



Concerning your earlier ridicule of me talking about levitation:

Levitation Science Fact



posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 08:25 AM
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Just a few thoughts, nothing more.

Big bang. So far not indisputable 100% proven but for the time being the most accepted theory.

Other serious possibility.

Former ATS member Sleeper said once, “There was no Big Bang, the universe as we see it through the Hubble telescope has been here forever”.

Others,

Eric J. Lerner, President, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics,Inc. advanced technology research, consulting and communications firm.

www.bigbangneverhappened.org...

www.physorg.com...


Solar system.

Earth.

Abiogensis.

Other serious possibility.

Life on Earth may have been kick-started by a meteorite and comet bombardment of molecular "food", believe some scientists.

news.bbc.co.uk...

Evolution.

Split of the hominid tree.

Modern humans.

Other serious possibility.

Upgrade humanoids thru means of genetic adjustments from an Earth visiting Extraterrestrial civilization to create modern humans.
The evidence for at least the Extraterrestrial reality and that they are already here do you find here.

www.disclosureproject.com...

Very interesting thread here on ATS,

www.abovetopsecret.com...'

Mr. Clifford Stone is one of the many witnesses who participate with the disclosure project.

OOA ?? I don’t know what that means, sorry.



posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 09:53 AM
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Please Stay On Topic!

While the other things are interesting and diverting, there are better places for those discussions. Meanwhile, could we return to the topic of and evidence for "forbidden Egyptology"?



posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 



Originally posted by Hanslune
Metallic handles? I don't recall that could you provide a link please?


Hey Hanslune,

Certainly.

The pieces below were found in and around the step pyramid of Saqqara. The origin of these pieces is unknown. No others of this standard have been found anywhere else AFAIK.

Were they passed down thru antiquity before their final resting place in Saqqara? Were they found and used as heir looms of sorts?

Here is the bowl made out of granite, completely hollowed out. This piece is flawless and has metallic (of bronze, gold?) handles fitted into the stone vessel itself. It sits in perfect balance on a surface area no more than that of an egg or .15" square. This would require the bowl having a symmetrical wall thickness all the way around with very little if any asymmetry.


This is highly advanced stone working on some of the hardest kind known. How long does such a technique so perfectly executed take to develop?

Here is a very similar looking bowl hewn out of andesite. Said to date back to the 1st dynasty. (right one) The handles are gold-leafed.



Some other interesting pieces:
The schist "bowl'- skyfloating presented this much earlier in this thread. It reminds me of a steering wheel.





What's this thing?




From the site of the pics:
"There were not just a few of these. Apparently there were thousands found in and around the Step pyramid......

.....It seems to be the only place where these kind of stone housewares were found in quantity, although Petrie found some fragments of similar bowls at Giza. Many of them have inscribed (scratched) onto them the symbols of the earliest kings of Egypt - the pre-dynastic era monarchs - from before the pharaohs. Judging by the primitive skill of the inscriptions, it seems unlikely that those signatures were made by the same craftsmen who fashioned the bowls in the first place. Perhaps they were added later by those who had somehow acquired them.
"


Source of pics and descriptions:
Source

Source

edit to add:

not sure why the bottom half of my post is all bolded out...even my signature!!


[edit on 5-6-2008 by PhotonEffect]



posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 05:11 PM
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Alright, since PhotonEffect is sharing some excellent material, I´ll place an addition to this ever growing thread as well.


For the skeptics who say that "winged serpent" type symbology only exists in the ancient americas, this is an AE papyrus from the Louvre Museum in Paris:








[edit on 5-6-2008 by Skyfloating]



posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 05:41 PM
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Beautiful bowl. Maybe they should be looking for granite shards then. Granite is definately not pottery.



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 07:41 AM
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Two very interesting posts guys.


reply to post by PhotonEffect
 


Here is the bowl made out of granite, completely hollowed out. This piece is flawless and has metallic (of bronze, gold?) handles fitted into the stone vessel itself.

This good find of you did remind me of something I had seen many years ago PhotonEffect.
It was about the finding of many beautiful hollowed vases that had out internal shoulders! Some had extremely long fluted narrow necks with fat hollowed out bellies.
It are magnificent and very impressive peaces of ART.
I wonder, where the Egyptians really capable of doing such with the tools they had to there disposal then?
I try to find some pictures of them but find only these.


What tools could to this? Also many of the vases had hollowed out internal shoulders! Some had extremely long fluted narrow necks with fat hollowed out bellies, microscopic vials, occasional strange wheel shaped objects cut out of metamorphic shist with inwardly curved lips planed down so fine that they were translucent. We absolutely could not duplicate this today!!



Stoneware such as this has not been found from any later era in Egyptian history - it seems that the skills necessary were lost.
Some delicate vases are made of very brittle stone such as schist (like a flint) and yet are finished, turned and polished, to a flawless paper thin edge - an extraordinary feat of craftsmanship.

Robert Francis - Photos and commentaries describing tube drilling, sawing and lathe work visible at Giza and in the Cairo Museum.


Egyptian "tube" facioned in a way very similar to the aztec earplugs:




And here is an egyptian vase, made out of solid granite in one piece, and hollowed out:





reply to post by Skyfloating
 


For the skeptics who say that "winged serpent" type symbology only exists in the ancient americas, this is an AE papyrus from the Louvre Museum in Paris:

Very good find Skyfloating, clearly a "winged serpent" in my opinion.
By the way, I see that you upgraded your avatar, it looks very good indeed.



[edit on 6/6/08 by spacevisitor]



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 08:19 AM
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reply to post by spacevisitor
 


Hey spacevisitor,

The pieces you present are quite impressive as well. I believe those are part of the same collection as the granite bowl.

It's difficult to comprehend how anyone could have worked such a hard stone into such a perfectly round hollowed out vessel or huge vase. I mean think about it, this is granite, not wood or clay! Truly amazing right?

It requires the use of drills with a large amount of downward pressure.... Drills in 3100 bc or perhaps earlier?!?! People were still supposed to have been nomadic during this era... Even the concept of a drill during these times is out of place, something doesn't add up here! These are some of the things that modern egyptology fails to address..they kind of just write it off as, "oh yeah they had drills, wooden bow drills you know"...

This is evidence of a higher knowledge and technique.

So where does one get this knowledge??

I have more in this.



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 03:37 PM
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Hans- FYI, when churches see me at the door, they quickly lock me out. They don't like the truth I bring them.


Oh, we lost the technology of drilling granite, for a few thousand years? The more the evidence is presented, the more it looks like accepted theory is just that..... someones thoughts, not necessarily the actual facts. It cannot be denied.

How many artifacts are sitting on those dusty shelves, unrecorded, because they don't fit with modern, accepted AE Theory? Will you freaks give your heads a shake, please!

There has been a tremendous amount of accepted theory refuted lately. It will be just a teaser, for when the real story is finally uncovered.



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 03:57 PM
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If the Egyptians did not have the technology to create those bowls and vases, perhaps they were gifts to the Kings. What culture is the most adept at granite work?



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 04:00 PM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating
Alright, since PhotonEffect is sharing some excellent material, I´ll place an addition to this ever growing thread as well.


For the skeptics who say that "winged serpent" type symbology only exists in the ancient americas, this is an AE papyrus from the Louvre Museum in Paris:




What is their take on that papyrus? what do they think it means? The context?



[edit on 5-6-2008 by Skyfloating]



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 04:16 PM
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Thought I'd post this here too considering the strangeness of it...I already posted it in this thread.

I see anomaly here, but that's just me. This is most probably what they say it is...just a lid. However the craftsmanship is pretty remarkable.

Found at the site of the so called Headless Pyramid...It almost looks metallic when the light hits it. The perfectly straight edges and holes are what caught my eye. And why does Hawass look so shifty?


Its either made of granite or grey schist, depending on where you read about it...


source


Here are some other pics of it:




source

source



[edit on 6-6-2008 by PhotonEffect]



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