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Boeing spokesperson laughs at the idea of a Boeing 767 going at 500 MPH at 700 feet

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posted on Feb, 25 2008 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
For ULTIMA, I was trying to point out that an ACARS mssg was sent at 0924, and respopnded to at 0926, and 'Mayday..' was recorded on ATC tapes...at 0928. You asked how do we know it was UA93, I said becauuse UA175 and AA11 were down already,


But wasn't Flight 93 hijacked by 0928?

Also do not forget Delta Flight 1989 also made a mayday call and was even confuesed for Flight 93 for a while.




posted on Feb, 25 2008 @ 07:55 PM
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reply to post by ULTIMA1
 

But wasn't Flight 93 hijacked by 0928?
Do you mean Flight 77?

If yes, then that would be highly unlikely. Flight 77 was never in Cleveland ARTCC which means that the hijackers would have had to change to Cleveland frequency before the pilots yelled May Day.


Also do not forget Delta Flight 1989 also made a mayday call and was even confuesed for Flight 93 for a while.
I've never heard of Delta 1989 making a mayday call, can you source that?



posted on Feb, 26 2008 @ 01:37 AM
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Originally posted by Boone 870I've never heard of Delta 1989 making a mayday call, can you source that?


256.com...

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 12:19:40 EDT
Subject: A close brush with death and happy to be alive

Dear Friends,

Many of you knew that [my spouse] and I and many [fellow] employees were on an 8 am flight from Boston to LA on Tuesday morning. I am happy to be alive and to be able to tell you of the events of our harrowing journey. Even though it has been only 48 hours since we departed Logan, it feels as though a lifetime has passed.

[My spouse] and I and six other fellow [...] employees were on the 8 am flight from Boston to Los Angeles on Tuesday, but we were on the Delta flight [1989], the one out of three 8am flights departing Logan that did not get hijacked. Instead, we were forced to make an emergency landing in Cleveland because there were reports that a bomb or hijacking was taking place on our plane. The pilot had radioed that there was suspicious activity in the cabin since one of the passengers was speaking urgently on his cellphone and ignored repeated flight attendant requests to stop using his cell phone while in flight. Also, there was an irregularity in the passenger manifest because there were two people [with the same middle eastern name] who were listed but only one aboard.



posted on Mar, 4 2008 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by ULTIMA1
 


ULTIMA,

Where exactly does the info you posted mention the pilots of DL 1989 making a 'MayDay' call?

Let me put this question another way...a US airline operating in US airspace will declare a 'MayDay' only if presented with a serious mechanical problem, such as a catastrophic engine failure that also affects flight controls...something that requires extreme priority handling.

To put this in perspective, in 1999 I had to shut down an engine on my B757, shortly after take-off from a NYC area airport. It was not a 'Fire-Warning', it was an 'Overheat-Warning'. (Fire warnings are red lights, OVHT warns are yellow). In any event, our checklist took us through the steps, to a shut-down. Now, we cannot continue the flight, obviously, and regs require a diversion to 'nearest suitable' airport. Since we had just left the NYC are, full of snow and bad weather, I diverted to Dulles (IAD), since it was CAVU. AT no time did I declare a 'MayDay', even though we had a situation. We informed ATC of our engine-out, and we got priority handling...because we were in constant communication with ATC...

BTW, didn't tell the pax, just told them it was mechanical. No need to unnecessarily invoke fear or panic.



posted on Mar, 5 2008 @ 01:30 AM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
Where exactly does the info you posted mention the pilots of DL 1989 making a 'MayDay' call?


"Instead, we were forced to make an emergency landing in Cleveland because there were reports that a bomb or hijacking was taking place on our plane."

[edit on 5-3-2008 by ULTIMA1]



posted on Mar, 5 2008 @ 01:40 AM
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Originally posted by ULTIMA1

Originally posted by weedwhacker
Where exactly does the info you posted mention the pilots of DL 1989 making a 'MayDay' call?


"Instead, we were forced to make an emergency landing in Cleveland because there were reports that a bomb or hijacking was taking place on our plane."

[edit on 5-3-2008 by ULTIMA1]


Again, this is not the 'MayDay' that is so commonly presented in movies...

Let me ask you, ULTIMA, if you know the other radio call that may be used, by an airplane, before the 'Mayday' call?

Guess you can look it up on the Web. Maybe not, I will wait to see if you know.

Another thing...we all know the term 'MayDay', right? Know its derivation???

Hint...it's French....

AND, professional pilots do NOT call for help, at first instinct.

[one spelling error]

[edit on 5-3-2008 by weedwhacker]



posted on Mar, 6 2008 @ 01:33 AM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
Again, this is not the 'MayDay' that is so commonly presented in movies...


Well funny though since they also recieved a "secure cockpit door" messeage they would have called or set the emergency code on the transponder if they thought a hijacking was taking place or a bomb on board.


[edit on 6-3-2008 by ULTIMA1]



posted on Mar, 6 2008 @ 02:14 AM
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Originally posted by ULTIMA1

Originally posted by weedwhacker
Again, this is not the 'MayDay' that is so commonly presented in movies...


Well funny though since they also recieved a "secure cockpit door" messeage they would have called or set the emergency code on the transponder if they thought a hijacking was taking place or a bomb on board.


[edit on 6-3-2008 by ULTIMA1]


Yes, ULTIMA, we have discussed this. I have told you how it works, in the ACARS, when a message is sent via ACARS. It takes time to puch the button to bring up the message. Then, it takes time to 'type' in the answer. assuming you just don't push the ONE button that is there to 'Acknowlege' the original message...

In order to 'type in' from the FMS keypad, it is not the QWERTY style, it is ABCDEF, not sure if that's a 'style', but it is not a keyboard as you type on, it is alphabetical. AND, numerical too, at the bottom.

Please, you can look this up online, it's not hard to find. Yeah, you can accuse me of finding it online, but what you won't find online is how to align the IRSs. You won't find about how the initial page has to be given a location, and how that is done, before the systems will begin to align....



posted on Mar, 6 2008 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
Yes, ULTIMA, we have discussed this. I have told you how it works, in the ACARS, when a message is sent via ACARS.


That was for flight 93 not flight 1989.



posted on Mar, 6 2008 @ 10:55 PM
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reply to post by ULTIMA1
 


There have been quite a few links to videos showing a B757, or military variant, flying at high speeds very close to the ground. THAT is the discussion at hand, not UA93.

False Flag, or not, isn't the topic of discussion here. Let's start a new thread???



posted on Mar, 7 2008 @ 02:13 PM
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There have been quite a few links to videos showing a B757, or military variant, flying at high speeds very close to the ground. THAT is the discussion at hand, not UA93.


I have a video of a model 757 showing how large turbulents would be at high speed close to the ground.

www.onera.fr...



posted on Mar, 8 2008 @ 02:05 AM
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reply to post by ULTIMA1
 


Sorry, ULTIMA, link airn't workin'!

Try again?

Thanks.



posted on Mar, 8 2008 @ 03:49 PM
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Originally posted by weedwhackerSorry, ULTIMA, link airn't workin'!

Try again?

Thanks.


Sorry old link, will see if i can get a newer one.

[edit on 8-3-2008 by ULTIMA1]



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 11:31 PM
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reply to post by L driver
 


I Googled up five different websites on the THY 981 crash in France, and four of them gave the max speed at crash as 430 knots, which I believe is the same as 430 mph.

Several sites indicated that the craft may have at least partially come apart in flight, since several rows of seats (with dead passengers) were found in a farmer's field some distance away from the final impact -- so it's possible that the aircraft reached 500 knots/mph, broke up, and then the main portion continued on for some seconds, at obviously greatly reduced speed, and then impacted at the generally-ascribed speed of 430 kn/mph.

I've never piloted anything bigger than a Cessna 140, and that was only as a 11-yr-old kid in the 50s, so this is strictly a layman's guess.



posted on Aug, 18 2010 @ 06:29 PM
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I think what alot of people are ignoring is the incredible amount of lift you are going to get if you try to go over 500 mph at sea level. I would venture to say, to fly that fast at that elevation, level, you would have to have the control column pushed completely forward, and even that would not likely keep the nose from going up. What causes nose up and nose down control, is the elevator control surfaces, on the tail of the aircraft. raising or lowering the elevator causes the aircraft to pivot on the axis that goes through wingtip to wingtip. The elevator pushes the tail up to make the nose go down. However, if you have an increasing force under your wings, pushing the wings upward, and your tail is also being pushed upward (to attempt to nose-down), the entire aircraft is going to rise. At that speed, it would be like flying with your flaps down. 500mph is perfectly feasible at 35,000'. But flying at sea-level at 500mph, causes the exact same forces and stresses on the aircraft as if it were flying at 2000mph at 35,000'. This is not possible in a 767. And before anyone asks, no, I am not a pilot. I was in the AF, as a mechanic, and am moderately familiar with flight controls and aerodynamics.





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