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Court won't review Guantanamo Bay evidence ruling

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posted on Feb, 1 2008 @ 12:50 PM
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Court won't review Guantanamo Bay evidence ruling


www.reuters.com

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. government on Friday lost a court bid to prevent terrorism detainees gaining access to all readily available documents about them as they challenge their indefinite imprisonment at Guantanamo Bay.

By a 5-5 vote, the full 10-member U.S. appeals court rejected an administration request to hear a case that a three-judge panel of the court ruled on last year. The tied vote meant the earlier decision remained in place.

(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Feb, 1 2008 @ 12:50 PM
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This is a good thing IMO. Some of these people held were found to be inocent, and they were locked away for year, for nothing...They should be able to defend themselves and have access to what reasons they're supposedly being detained for...

Continued:

That ruling required the government to provide detainees with all readily available documents to help them challenge their designation as enemy combatants.

The United States has been widely criticized by human rights organizations for its treatment of those it has designated as enemy combatants in the war against terrorism.

There are about 275 detainees at the U.S. military base at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba, which was set up to handle prisoners captured by the United States following the September 11 attacks.

Detainee lawyers have argued that giving them the right to review all documents compiled by the U.S. government, not just those presented to the military tribunal, could help clear the prisoners, many of whom have been held for about six years.

Under a U.S. law called the Detainee Treatment Act, the prisoners can bring legal challenges before the appeals court to decisions made by the "Combatant Status Review Tribunal."




www.reuters.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



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