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Wine Makers, Brewers. What to Stock up on?

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posted on Mar, 3 2008 @ 02:45 PM
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one thing you may want to consider is the stainless steel kegs from fountain soda machines. I think they are 2.5-3 gallon...I am not sure though...it sounds to me that they are going to stop using these on fountian machines(just what I got from a conversation w/ the wifes uncle) so they may be easily obtained. I am going to use mine to take my brew to parties and to carbonate some of my meads not a bad idea for mass storage either...5 or 6 of those are easier to move than cases of bottles and they wont breakl either

[edit on 3-3-2008 by kaferwerks]




posted on Mar, 3 2008 @ 03:30 PM
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That's interesting. If they stop using the small ones I may go ahead and get a couple and adapt them to small grain brewing batches. Can't beat good stainless for cleaning or toughness. Might make a good crab cooker too with the top opened up.



posted on Mar, 3 2008 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by Illahee
 


can I come over for crabs?


I will get the wife to talk to her uncle and find out for sure but it really seemed like that was the direction it was headed. I want to get more of these anyway for bulk aging.

There could be many uses for a vessel like that in a survival situation



posted on Mar, 3 2008 @ 07:59 PM
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Here are some 5gal “corny kegs” with ball locks great for all kinds of beverage storage. This is how I store my malted barley, hops and water.
You must use a pressurized gas (Co2 at 5-8lbs.) to push the liquid out.
This is a good deal at $27.50 each with new seals.

chicompany.ne t "corny kegs"

edit to add: from there site:"1. In February, 2008, the last Corporate Pepsi plant in the Western U.S. that made premix soda has shut down the Premix line. We have acquired the LAST release of 5 gallon Ball Lock Kegs! From here on in kegs will trickle into the plant, a few at a time, as Pepsi collects them from old accounts, but the days of of "lots of kegs" is now gone forever! As many of you know, the Chinese have been importing these into China for years, ten's of thousands at a time out of the U.S. The USED SUPPLY IS ALMOST GONE!"

[edit on 3-3-2008 by Zeptepi]



posted on Mar, 5 2008 @ 10:22 AM
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I know a lot of folks are pumping nitrogen and other things onto wine in these little kegs, so they essentially have a draft wine dispenser. It seemed pretty tacky to me, so its bottles there. I'm looking at the 30 bottles of French Cab in the carboy and can't bring myself to do it. I think I might pick one or two up for the grain cooks and just buy the fittings and parts at the brew store.



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 03:42 PM
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Several beer kits later, it seems like the canadian lager, pilsner and cervesa from coopers seem to produce the best products.

French Cab is dy-no-mite! and still only three weeks in the bottle. Starting a premium old vine zin.....

Beer supplies are climbing through the roof right now. Stock up on cans of prehopped, and 2 row if you can.

Next up pinot, regular cab and sangiovese.



posted on Jul, 14 2008 @ 12:04 AM
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Going for a new wine kit this week. Pinot. They have jumped 30% in a couple months here, wondering if the local is burning customers...

[edit on 14-7-2008 by Illahee]



posted on Jul, 14 2008 @ 12:31 AM
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FredT hit the nail on the head. Yeast is the key.

Every other ingredient for various fruit wines can be found relatively easy. That's my personal preference in a survival situation...

Food-grade barrels and plastic tubing also. Don't break down and use some rusty steel drum you found in the back of an abandoned garage.

It needs to be said that alcohol is not a strict survival necessity, keep that in mind. Also, alcohol in a survival situation is generally a very bad idea. It can make you stupid, it dehydrates you, and it can exacerbate depression and hopelessness.



posted on Jul, 14 2008 @ 08:09 AM
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reply to post by WyrdeOne
 


I agree that alcohol consumption is a poor idea in a short-term survival situation. Consider, though, if it's a long-term change. I've been experimenting lately with two things: 1) producing flour from naturally-occuring plants (here): West Indian Almond, breadfruit, and coconut. The other is wine production from locally-occurring fruits. I do stock yeasts, but want to reserve them for breadmaking, so I've been using ambient yeasts. This requires rinsing the fruit exterior, but not scrubbing. We used to make beer, but since neither of us can stand warm beer, we've been focusing on wine. We're also not expending additional sugars, and the fermentation takes a longer time, but has been [so far] successful and drinkable.

Distilling, once the proper items are in place and understand of the process, is simple. Fermentations are an art. I've consumed many mistakes.

I think certain wines have favorable health benefits, as well as a potential tradeable commodity.

Cheers, and thanks to OP for the thread!



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 02:46 PM
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First: sorry for raising such an old thread from the dead (heh), but this was the only one I could find on beer and wine making on the whole forum.

I'm a homemade beer and wine maker myself, just finished off a batch of Amber Boch (and by finished off, I mean that all 5 gallons got consumed by my family in weeks. I was lucky to get a couple of bottles of it for myself).

Right now I have a cream sherry aging, and it should be ready in a few weeks.

As pointed out, in some really bad situations, making my own hooch would most likely be the last thing I would think of. However, if it were long term situations, such as the infrastructure just collapsing, as pointed out, home made beers, wines, and shine would more than likely be a bartering tool.

And besides, at the end of the day, whether I was just at the office as normal, or if I was done fighting off zombies, I'm going to want to kick back with a cold one in my hand, heheheh.

One thing I was thinking of: you can make just about anything. Wines from fruits, beer from grains and sugars. You can make a "wash" with just about any sugar you want and yeast for distilling later of course.

But the yeast is the thing I was thinking about. You can stock up of course with dry yeast, but I have been wondering if I can actually re-use my own yeasts. I seemed to think I read somewhere that it's actually hard to kill the yeast off. You can suspend it, but that it's possible to re-use the yeast that collects in your bucket, and dry it out.

Haven't spent any time looking this up yet (and I guess I should get off my rear and do it).

Apology again for raising such an old thread.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Surprising that an expert like you won't google "make your own yeast" first.

Face it, people have done it for MILLENIA.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 04:14 PM
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Shelve lives arent too good for a lot of brewing ingredients. Even DME will go.

For short term you can get some DME, uncrushed grains, some dry ale yeasts and keep them in an air-tight container at a constant low temp.

Long-term though brewers will have to resort to non-hopped gruit or a wild yeast lambic style product.

Start a beer garden now. Plant some grains, one or two varieties of hops. Try your hand at malting. Its a serious PITA if you ask me. Throw out a few jars of a simple wort covered with cheese cloth and see what wild yeasties you've got in the neighborhood.

Alcohol would never be a problem. Everything ferments. Prisoners can still get loaded off of bread, ketchup packets and fruit cups. The problem will be making the best out of what we have on hand.

A walk in a field yields plenty of great ingredients. Dandelion, wormwood, yarrow, spruce, etc...

Great beer (or gruit) is growing all around you. Gods greatest gift.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by buddhasystem
 



Oh no, far, far from expert. I've only been doing it for about 5 years now and about 20 batches. I'm just lazy is all!


I have thought about trying to do another "wild bacteria" batch. My first one did not do so well. The "wild bacteria" ended up being mildew that skunked the beer (nasty!).

Inmates down here in the south make what we call "Buck". Basically grape juice with some sugar and a Sticky Bun for the yeast (and is why sugar is considered contraband in the prisons here! hehehe).

I whipped up a wash, was nothing more than water, several pounds of brown sugar and molassas, and bread yeast.
After just a week, I suspended the yeast with some potassium sorbate, ran it though a filter, and then chilled it. Had a nice nut brown flower, sweet and ended up being pretty strong. Not sure what the ABV was since I forgot to do a gravity reading when I started it.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 05:10 PM
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Look into yeast storage for your wine.

You may be able to extend the shelf life if you keep it cool.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 05:14 PM
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Originally posted by eriktheawful
I have thought about trying to do another "wild bacteria" batch. My first one did not do so well. The "wild bacteria" ended up being mildew that skunked the beer (nasty!).


...and that's a very important concern. The off-taste in beers happens because of various wild yest, and as you know that's one reason to boil water, to kill the intruders. How you keep stash of your own yeast culture for a long time, I don't know. In Norway, in one place they were brewing for centuries, and they would dunk a fir tree branch in the barrel and let it get covered in yeast, then it becomes the yest for the next batch. But you can't expect this kind of continuity in the TSHTF scenario.

I made some really good mead once by keeping everything clean and pure and using good yest. When I tried to add fruit etc in later batches, these were p!ss poor.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 05:23 PM
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Originally posted by Wildbob77
Look into yeast storage for your wine.

You may be able to extend the shelf life if you keep it cool.



Actually yes, was just reading that people do this for their beer batches. Scoop up the yeast sediment after racking from primary, place in like a mason jar and store in the fridge. Can keep from 3 to 6 months.

Or just add a new batch of beer / wine to the old wort sediment right away after racking from the primary.

However I just read also that re-using the yeast after about 5 generations or so, you need to be careful as unwanted bacteria can creep in.

I'm looking up to see if there is a dehydration process that will let me dry out the yeast and store it that way.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 05:25 PM
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reply to post by buddhasystem
 


I read about a place in Belgium that makes a wheat beer and is naturally fermented by bacteria in the wood timbers where they make the beer. Place is like 400 years old (and they've been making it that long). Wish I could remember the name of the beer........



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 05:28 PM
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Originally posted by eriktheawful
reply to post by buddhasystem
 


I read about a place in Belgium that makes a wheat beer and is naturally fermented by bacteria in the wood timbers where they make the beer. Place is like 400 years old (and they've been making it that long). Wish I could remember the name of the beer........


Doesn't matter. All Belgian beer is good


However, have you tried Myrcenary from Odell? This is the One.



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