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Dumbing Down Rebellion with Prescription Drugs

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posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 12:39 PM
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Maybe I should have taken more responsibility for my life when I was ten years old. I should have taken my father's shotgun, shot all those goddam book-burning nerd-hating Khmer Rouge teachers, ran away from home, fled to Mexico, and spent the rest of my life educating myself by reading forbidden books in libraries.

Somehow I don't think so.


I just wanted to acknowledge your comment re: your experience with the Khmer Rouge regime. I'm sure there are some reading here who are not familiar with what happened in Cambodia during this time and it would be interesting if you could draw parallels with your experience in the Khmer Rouge "re-education schools" and this topic.




posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 06:19 PM
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reply to post by IAmTetsuo
 


Not really sure what your getting at, I wasn't aware that the Khmer Rouge we're forcing mind altering medications on you at such a young age and if they were, my sympathies.

I've been speaking only from my personal experience here in the US and that no one forces medications down my throat. I was merely commenting on how, through my own research and experiences with having attention problems that I benefit greatly from the medications that I've researched and that I've decided to ingest.

Unfortunately most parents and people don't do any research and simply do what the doctors tell them. That was my point about taking some responsibility in ones own life.



posted on Feb, 2 2008 @ 02:40 PM
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To kattraxx and Comma8Comma1:

I grew up in Canada not Cambodia, during the dark ages (70s, 80s) I was being metaphorical when I referred to my "Khmer Rouge" teachers - just like the words "Nazis" and "fascists" are used as metaphors in common speech. And nobody drugged me. Though it might have been more merciful than the verbal hellfire with the occasional episode of physical abuse I had to endure from teachers, parents, and community.

Today I still struggle with depression as well as other lifelong medical conditions. This depression is partly biophysical and partly reactive to all the traumas of my life.

But now that I mentioned it, I might as well point out the parallels between Pol Pot and his Khmer Rouge thugs - and the suicidogenic government schools I was enslaved to in the 1970s:

Anti-intellectualism They provided no special support for gifted children such as myself. The teachers were themselves not gifted nor educated well. Teaching was all by rote, and more concerned with mindless obedience than critical thinking and Socratic questioning. There was an atmosphere of vicious hatred and envy towards real thought, creativity, and productivity.

Barbarism This is the best word for it. An emphasis on physical education, physical culture, nature-worship, blue-collar peasantry, and brute force. Even the curriculum focused on those aspects of literature, art, history, and even science.

Anti-Westernism Even back in the 1970s the educational establishment turned away from the classical bedrock of Western civilization towards the Third World, anti-white racism, oriental despotism, the evils of westenr imperialism, and the like. Science was evil, as was anything "nuclear" or "space" related. Christianity, Marxism and other pseudo-Western counterfeits were tolerated, of course.

Hypocritical Pseudo-Equality This is a subset of anti-intellectuality that crusaded against "elitism", but only in the intellectual sphere. Smart children were punished for asking too many (i.e. the wrong) questions, and making the teachers think. Dumbness was cool. But schools were very elitist when it came to sports and other ritualistic contests of muscle.

Collectivism packaged up as socialization. If the teachers and staff were unable to break the will of freethinkers, then why not create an artificial cult-like social mileiu where peers can do the same? Add to that the emphasis on group-work, group-thinking.



posted on Feb, 2 2008 @ 06:43 PM
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reply to post by IAmTetsuo
 


Got it.. Khmer Rouge metaphor. Thanks for your comments and all the thought and effort you put into your posts. They are brilliantly written and your's, I never skip over when scanning ATS, simply to enjoy the quality of your writing.



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