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The speed of Darkness

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posted on Jan, 29 2008 @ 06:50 PM
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This thread prompts me to pose another question: what is the speed of thought?

It also leads me to suggest that the answer is: it varies.




posted on Jan, 29 2008 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by tayga
 


Hehe

Some think like the light, some think like the darkness...



posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 01:02 AM
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Actually dark is faster and heavier than light. Please read the theory of "Dark Suckers" here:

see these sites:

www.msu.edu...

home.netcom.com...

[edit on 31-1-2008 by addvantage666]



posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 03:17 AM
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reply to post by addvantage666
 


LOL

Craig Dyni's Homepage of Humor is where this is linked from...

www.msu.edu...

I hope you were trying to make a joke...


Can't be sure on ATS anymore...


Edited to add:

home.netcom.com...

Another gem from the same guy who wrote 'dark sucker theory'...


[edit on 31/1/2008 by ANOK]



posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 11:03 AM
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Originally posted by ANOK
There is no darkness, only lack of light. So therefore darkness has no speed...
Wouldnt that make it the speed of light?
, because thats all darkness is, is simply a reaction (or lack thereof) to light.



posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 11:26 AM
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Well i would say both coexist. When the light is on in the room you can see the objects, turn the light off and you don't see the objects, it does not mean they are not there. The same i think with the darkness. If the light is on you cannot see the darkness, with the lights out you see the darkness. Maybe darkness is more around us than we think. Maybe it is the other way around. Darkness is lack of light. I think the light can enter the darkness but not vice versa. Darkness doe not enter into the light. For light to exist it most need darkness, darkenss does not need the light. Does it make sence to you people.



posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 01:28 PM
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reply to post by ANOK
 


Yes, it was a bit of humor.

However, if the understanding of light is that it travels at 186,000 miles per second, then when a light bulb is shut off, the last tail piece of the light is followed by the presence of darkness at precisely the same speed as the light it follows.

But after the light is gone, does the dark really move at all?



posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 01:55 PM
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The way I see it:

I've always looked at the world as if there's more than just a circle of infinity... I've always seen it as a "8"... and really the only important numbers are +1, (0), -1. Other numbers are just multiples and fractions of 1.

If darkness is the absence of light, it would make sense that it is a 0, and say light is 1. I've always thought that there is a "-" to our space that we can't even comprehend.

Another thought is that if a photon stops moving, it will never reach your optic nerve, and would ultimately register as dark. Dark, absolute zero, absence of existence.

... maybe dark matter is the other side of our universe? the "-"...



posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 02:28 PM
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Originally posted by addvantage666
reply to post by ANOK
 


Yes, it was a bit of humor.

However, if the understanding of light is that it travels at 186,000 miles per second, then when a light bulb is shut off, the last tail piece of the light is followed by the presence of darkness at precisely the same speed as the light it follows.

But after the light is gone, does the dark really move at all?


LOL this has been explained. Light travels through a vacuum called space which has NO colour or substance. Our eyes are designed to 'see' certain frequencies of light waves. We see objects when that light is reflected off those objects and enters our eyes. So when there is no light to reflect our eyes don't work very well, thus we don't see very well. So what do you expect to happen when your eyes can't see reflected light? You will see, in your brain, 'darkness'. You are not seeing darkness with your eyes, your brain is just not able to interpret objects due to the lack of light so you see nothing, which is interpreted in your brain as darkness. Simply the lack of light.

So no darkness does not move, only light moves.



posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 02:56 PM
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I have read all the threads, what an interesting post.
If light has the ability to overwhelm darkness temporarely, as in day and night, then why does the background of space remain black, in darkness, when the light from the sun hits say, the space station. The station is in light yet the immediate vicinity of the SS is still pitch black.
Even when it is night time the sun is still shining, so why don't we see the sun light passing the earth?



posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 04:00 PM
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hummm u know howl like flash lights show light in dark area's maybe we can make a flash darkness in light area's sounds crazy i no hahhaha but never know what the gov. hinds right hahah



posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 08:30 PM
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Originally posted by alien life uk
so why don't we see the sun light passing the earth?


Because, as has been explained all through this thread, for you to see anything light has to reflect off of that something. There is nothing in empty 'space' for light to reflect off. You see the sun because it is reflecting it's own light off of itself. You never see light directly. You see the space station because it reflects light, and because it's so high it can still be in direct line to the sun even when to you it is night time.

How light is reflected off of an object determines how you see it. A blue object is reflecting only light in that spectrum, other colours are absorbed by the object. A shiny object reflects more light than a dull object. It works by the electrons in the object absorbing certain colours more than others.

It's all rods and cones in the eyes and how your brain perceives light.



posted on Feb, 1 2008 @ 01:45 AM
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reply to post by ANOK
 


I understand what you have been saying this entire time now. What you posted made me understand. I don't know what it was that you just said, but it made it seem clearer.

Thanks ANOK


Still open to more possible theories if there are any.

[edit on 1-2-2008 by Nyte Angel]



posted on Feb, 3 2008 @ 11:06 PM
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wow just wow, I can't believe this is a discussion.

Nyte if you have problems grasping the concept of darkness as nothing, I really don't want to be around when we have to explain that there is no such thing as cold.



posted on Feb, 4 2008 @ 03:44 AM
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Originally posted by Tsakara
Nyte if you have problems grasping the concept of darkness as nothing, I really don't want to be around when we have to explain that there is no such thing as cold.




This has to be one of the no-such-thingest mornings I've ever experienced. When I got up this am it was a moonless and sunless pitch dark, and now, at the office, it's blurry freeeeezing!

One thing that has taxed my imagination for a few years now is what happens when time stops? Does everything go dark (because light isn't moving anymore) or not (because the photons are all held in place)? If the latter, then can it ever be possible to move through a solid wall of frozen photons? Or are they too small to impede us. In which case, what would you see? Would things around you change and deform as you moved, going back into their lumenant histories as you walk away from them and towards their present as you approach them? And is the superpower of time-stopping of any worth whatever, as things become immobilised by inertia; or super-brilliant because as speed reduces mass decreases making the heaviest boulder a pebble in the time-stopper's hands?

Off topic? I don't think so. The answer probably explains how darkness is an absence of light, rather than a presence of anti-light or whatever, just as black is an absence of colour, anti-gravity is the absence of mass, and cold is a total absence of any agitation of atoms whatever.

Which is why I'm shivering - in the vain hope of agitating a sufficient quantity of atoms to stay warm.

[edit on 4/2/08 by hidatsa]



posted on Feb, 4 2008 @ 10:31 AM
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same as light mate. they both work with each other.



posted on Feb, 4 2008 @ 10:35 AM
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Is darkness different from anti-light?



posted on Feb, 4 2008 @ 11:28 AM
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Putting science to one side for the moment, let's just take a little 'lighter side' look at this dilemma.

In nature, all things must have balance for everything to exist. Too much of one thing wipes out something else.

Let's take fire and water for example. A big fire will boil away a kettle of water.
A kettle of water will extinguish a small fire.

Fire and water in equal amounts will cancel each other out. As the fire is put out by the boiling water, so the boiling water evaporates until neither exist.

Now, we all know what stars give us. and we all know how dark space is.

We are able to see small points of light from the stars closest to us. Others are so far away it will be millions of years more before we see the light.

What if you could collect all the stars into the centre of the universe. Would the universe become grey instead of black. The focal point of all the stars' brightness should light up the universe like a candle in a dark room.

So why don't we see that happening anyway. Reson we don't see it is due to the stars being so far away and the energy is not focused.

The best example of 'grey light' I can give is the time of the day when it's not quite daylight and it's not quite nighttime. Especially when you're out and about in an area where there are no street lights or moon light. Experience that and you'll know what I mean.

From that perspective, you have the perfect balance of light and dark giving the dusky light of the 'inbetween'.

So does light cancel darkness? yes.
Does darkness cancel light? yes.
You can't have one without the other and neither can one be more powerful than the other.

Perfect balance of all things.



posted on Feb, 4 2008 @ 03:45 PM
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Originally posted by Extralien
Does darkness cancel light? yes.
You can't have one without the other and neither can one be more powerful than the other.


Actually no it doesn't. Something that doesn't exist can't cancel out something that does. Yes you can have light without the other. Darkness only exists in your head as a reaction to your eyes being unable to perceive any light.
Darkness has no power, period. Only light does.

Keep trying, but I'm afraid there are no undiscovered theories when it comes to light.



posted on Feb, 4 2008 @ 04:18 PM
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Originally posted by ANOK
Something that doesn't exist can't cancel out something that does. Yes you can have light without the other.



Firstly, having light without any darkness at all, ever, just simply means everything is visible and negates the point of lights existence.

Secondly, something does exist.... here lies the problem though, the ability to describe that something, best they can do so far s call it dark energy.

So darkness does have power.


Galaxies today are struggling to clump together against the incredible repulsive power of dark energy, hints a new survey of thousands of galaxies. Measuring this anti-clumping effect puts a new arrow in the quiver of cosmologists seeking to uncover the nature of the mysterious force.

Scientists proposed the existence of a mysterious repulsive force called dark energy in 1998 to explain supernova observations showing the universe is expanding at ever faster rates.

Since then, researchers have been trying to measure the properties of dark energy more precisely, in the hope of discovering what it is. Possible explanations include fluctuating energy fields from quantum physics and the effects of unseen extra spatial dimensions.

space.newscientist.com...


Dark energy: Seeking the heart of darkness,

There is no way to detect dark energy directly, so we have to measure its effects. The most obvious of these is the one that gave it away in the first place: the way it forces the expansion of the universe to accelerate.

Although dark energy is a ubiquitous term in cosmological conversations, no one actually knows what it is. Although there are plenty of tentative explanations, each one seems to suffer from some fatal flaw. The simplest of the solutions on offer is the so-called cosmological constant. This is an energy associated with space-time that was originally invoked by Einstein in his equations of general relativity.

"Dark energy could be the ether of the 21st century,".
"We are definitely seeing something extra in the universe, we just do not know how to interpret it yet,".

www.newscientist.com...



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