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Defunct Spy Satellite Falling From Orbit

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posted on Feb, 16 2008 @ 02:44 PM
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Hey... I have a question for people who may know...

I checked out this Heavens Above site, to see when and where I can see this sat'... on Feb 18 it shows two times on the same date with... here check this out...

18 Feb 3.0 18:22:59 10 S 18:24:46 20 SE 18:26:32 10 ENE
18 Feb 5.1 19:55:45 10 W 19:56:11 13 WNW 19:56:11 13 WNW

I am now, officially confused... I am in the Niagara Falls/St. Catharines area in Ontario, does anyone have a reason for this?


oh yeah, and the same for the 19th visible pass

[edit on 16-2-2008 by StoneGarden]




posted on Feb, 16 2008 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by hildar
 


Erm, no. The news is pulling things out of the air again. There is no missile that could be launched from a ship that could still maneuver four days later. It would run out of fuel in no time. The missile isn't going to be able to go fast enough to stay in orbit for four days either. It won't take longer than a few minutes at best to hit.



posted on Feb, 16 2008 @ 08:43 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by hildar
 


Erm, no. The news is pulling things out of the air again. There is no missile that could be launched from a ship that could still maneuver four days later. It would run out of fuel in no time. The missile isn't going to be able to go fast enough to stay in orbit for four days either. It won't take longer than a few minutes at best to hit.


Well to me that 4 days just sounded stupid, but since it was on the news I guess alot of folks are believing it. But it seemed strange to me when they said it since we all know the challenger and them dont take that long to get up there. If it took 4 days for 150 miles? that would be slower then my car on a bad day.

Hilda



posted on Feb, 16 2008 @ 09:13 PM
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The missile tests they've been doing for the last 10+ years have generally been months and months of planning, for 10 minutes of excitement. They'd launch a missile from the missile range on Kauai, and the ship offshore would shoot it down in orbit a few minutes later. Test over.



posted on Feb, 16 2008 @ 11:38 PM
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Near Field Infrared Experiment (NFIRE)
Country: USA
Basing: Space
Details

The Near Field Infrared Experiment (NFIRE) will consist of a series of test satellites in low-Earth orbit carrying infrared sensors and releasable kill vehicles. The experiment will improve the ability of infrared sensors to detect and track incoming ballistic missiles in their boost phase, and test the accuracy of kill vehicles against live target missiles. The Pentagon’s Missile Defense Agency plans to deploy the first NFIRE satellite in the summer of 2004.
www.missilethreat.com...
General Dimensions, Stowed w/PL: 2.65 m x 1.31 m dia (8.69 x 4.30 ft)
Orbit: 495 km (267 naut mi) @ 49.0° inclination
Propellant On Board: Blowdown hydrazine, 114 kg capacity
Reliability/Life (predicted): 0.85 @ 2 years
Launch Vehicle: OSP Minotaur
Make of this what you will.



posted on Feb, 16 2008 @ 11:51 PM
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Should have looked a little deeper. The kill vehicle program was terminated. The satellite was launched but it carries a communication laser instead of a kill vehicle. It wasn't even going to be a real kill vehicle. It was going to be a sensor that would relay information on how the missiles were reacting in space, and how to tell the warhead from the body of the missile. It was not intended to hit the missile, but there was a likelyhood of accidental impact, so it was removed to get the budget for the satellite passed.



posted on Feb, 17 2008 @ 04:56 PM
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Looks like the Russians aren’t convinced that the USA story is totally legitimate.

www.breitbart.com...

I think that they could be killing several birds with one stone. Testing anti-satellite tech, while destroying a possible intelligence coup by other countries. If it is fuel that they’re worried about, it must be nuclear.

[edit on 17-2-2008 by resistor]

[edit on 17-2-2008 by resistor]



posted on Feb, 17 2008 @ 05:08 PM
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Well, since I can't seem to add this left off bit by editing, I'll just make another post.


Here's what some 'experts' are saying about the official story.

blog.wired.com...



posted on Feb, 17 2008 @ 06:25 PM
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Originally posted by resistor
Well, since I can't seem to add this left off bit by editing, I'll just make another post.


Here's what some 'experts' are saying about the official story.

blog.wired.com...


Now if what they say is true and we are trying to show off our stuff to China wont the US feel a bit like a fool if we miss, We Know GW will be red in the face if the Chinese people start laughing at him. Since he wants to prove we can do what they did.

Hilda



posted on Feb, 17 2008 @ 06:54 PM
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reply to post by resistor
 


Who cares? It may be a cool show to watch. Guys just like to blow stuff up, The Russians are just jealous and money says they do it soon. Wouldn't it be funny if Russia shot our satellite down
?



posted on Feb, 18 2008 @ 11:38 PM
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Originally posted by Sky watcher
reply to post by resistor
 


Who cares? It may be a cool show to watch. Guys just like to blow stuff up, The Russians are just jealous and money says they do it soon. Wouldn't it be funny if Russia shot our satellite down
?

Or do the great what if. If we created 2001's HAL it would protect itself computer glitch and so on. This satellite may be in operation to destroy or kill on coming anything. Most are laser kill devices. USA193 may be a cover story for the real deal.
How could the military state that it does not know what is onboard this satellite? You can research anything on the web and find out. They are playing with us.



posted on Feb, 19 2008 @ 12:19 AM
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reply to post by hildar
 



The 'shot' -- that’s what Ambassador James Jeffrey called the decision to use an an Aegis SM-3 to try to shoot down satellite USA 193 in the next 3-12 days.

Holding the aside the politics of this — which are terrible — the briefing on debris risk left me cold. I have to say that I am very, very uneasy about this decision — our missile defense tests have been heavily scripted to minimize debris creation and modeling of debris creation isn’t an exact science.

The burden of proof really should be on these guys to demonstrate that the risks to the ISS and other objects in space are minimal.

General Carwright, to his credit, provided enough technical information to model the intercept. David Wright is working on that right now — for those of you who can’t wait, the important numbers are:

1. The intercept will occur at 240 kilometers (130 nautical miles)
2. The mass of the satellite is 2,300 kg (5,000 pounds)
3. The mass of the interceptor is 20 kg. (From CBO)
4. The closing velocity will be 9.8 km/s (22,000 mph), suggesting a virtually head-on collision.

Other pertinent observations. At 240 km, the satellite should be traveling 7.8 km/s; the SM-3 has a burnout velocity of 3 km/s.

I am very worried about the debris creation — particularly the debris that the light-weight interceptor will kick into higher orbits when it hits the massive (bus-sized) satellite. Think, as Geoff Forden suggested, of a ping pong ball hitting a superball.

Virtually all the debris should come down quickly. Cartwright said 50 percent would come down within two orbits, with the rest coming down in weeks and months. That seems plausible, at first blush.

But those two orbits could be hairy and some of the debris will remain in orbit. Michael Griffin, NASA Administrator, said there are “good times and bad times” to conduct the intercept, based on the position of the ISS but that “bad times are not all that bad” comparing the risk to an order of magnitude lower than flying the shuttle.

Last I checked, the Space Shutle's PRAN (probability risk assessment number, of complete loss of life) was 1 in 100. Extrapolating, there would be only a 1 in 1000 chance of wiping out the ISS.

Great.

Anyway, we should be able to get some real numbers in the next 24 hours.

-- Jeffrey Lewis, cross-posted at ArmsControlWonk.com

ALSO:

Pentagon Unveils Rogue Spy Sat Shoot-Down Plan
Pentagon to Shoot Down Rogue Satellite
U.S. May Shoot Down Errant Satellite
Falling Spy Sat: Don't Panic
Spy Satellite Will Plummet to Earth
How China Loses the Coming Space War (Pt. 1)
How China Loses the Coming Space War (Pt. 2)
How China Loses the Coming Space War (Pt. 3)
Ukraine Big: We Can Spot Your Sats, Control Space
How to Blow Up a Satellite
"Autonomous" Mini-Spacecraft Team up to Replace Big Sats
Video: Double Hit for Missile Interceptors
Missile Defense's Tight Fit
Missile Defense: Ready Now, or Ready Never?









Let's be honest here, you'd rather see them just let this thing land wherever it may, than have them successfully use a weapons system that you've been railing against.

I mean, why are you more concerned about the extremely small risk to those in space, versus the unknown risk to the rest of us, including the release of 1000 gallons of poisonous chemicals.

Your article is an embarrassment. Even things you disagree with can have positive aspects.

Posted by: Tor B | Feb 14, 2008 2:05:28 PM

Excellent analysis - an especially good point IRT the risk being one order of magnitude lower than flying the shuttle. The risk to all artificial satellites should be considered, before a crucial communications or weather satellite, or the ISS.

It is easy to understand that the spy agencies want the spy satellite utterly
destroyed, but how much risk are they placing



posted on Feb, 19 2008 @ 12:24 AM
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Has it fallen yet?

Or been shot down?

Hope so, cos last night I dreamt of this metal thing on fire falling out the sky. Burning up. But, it was definitely a big metal thing that fell nearby.

OMG I just read the other thread about this!!

wow... I live in Australia... that is amazing..




[edit on 19-2-2008 by Thurisaz]



posted on Feb, 19 2008 @ 01:28 AM
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reply to post by Thurisaz
 


Australia again? I remember during the 70's. Skylab was also falling and the predicted hit was Philippines. Well, it fell all the way down under western Australia.

Skylab was a much bigger object compared to this current satellite.

I am not sure how accurate it is this time, but.. why always Australia?



[edit on 19-2-2008 by searching_for_truth]



posted on Feb, 19 2008 @ 01:28 AM
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The thread we were posting on got closed so we've been directed over here..


Originally posted by mungodave
....... OR maybe....it might be about to bite Pine Gap on the arse lol


Now THAT would be both amusing and ironic ey ? lol


reply to post by Thurisaz
 


About your dream, and also wrangell76 if you make it over here, did you see it actually hit ? What were the effects in your dream ?

[edit on 19-2-2008 by ImJaded]



posted on Feb, 19 2008 @ 01:29 AM
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reply to post by searching_for_truth
 


Perhaps pine gap is the target ?

lol

On a serious note, I don't know but I don't like it one bit. What did we ever do to anybody to warrant trouble such as this ?



posted on Feb, 19 2008 @ 01:32 AM
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reply to post by ImJaded
 


Fresh off the press ( Ithink)

www.smh.com.au...

www.news.com.au...

From Oz with love....... what did we do to deserve this..........


AND who is gonna clean up the mess ???????????



Mungo



posted on Feb, 19 2008 @ 01:34 AM
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reply to post by mungodave
 


I also remember during the Skylab incident in the 70's. When skylab landed in Australia (safely, thank God), the Australian government did not demand any compensation. They just asked the U.S. to buy more Australian dairy products. Fair enough IMO.


Seriously though, wherever it lands this time, I hope no one gets hurt.



[edit on 19-2-2008 by searching_for_truth]



posted on Feb, 19 2008 @ 01:35 AM
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I just wanted to mention this to all the Aussies who just got kicked out of the other thread by "the titor experience."

The US has still not payed the littering fine from when Skylab landed on Australia. Not kidding.

Here's the Wiki article, but I think it leaves out that the fine is still outstanding.

DOH!

[edit on 2/19/0808 by jackinthebox]



posted on Feb, 19 2008 @ 01:40 AM
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reply to post by jackinthebox
 


As I mentioned in my post above. Australian government really stated that (in a jocular manner) after the incident.

I don't know if there was really an increase of import of dairy products from Australia to US after that.



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