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1943 New Mexico Pic

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posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 02:46 PM
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The Library of Congress has teamed up with Flickr and has made a huge number of photos taken in the 1930s and 40s available to the public. I have gotten hooked on them. They are fascinating to look through to see the stages of develop and the change in societ as you move from the 30s (depression, dustbowl, share cropping, etc.) to the 40s and the wind up to WWII.

Almost all of these pics have little dirt spots and fuzzy-wuzzies on them, along with an occasional pinpoint flaw of some sort, but this next pic has something in it that looks odd to me. Would like to get your input on what you think of it.

Taken March 1943 between Laguna and Gallup, New Mexico by photographer Jack Delano. "Photograph shows train and flagman in far distance."

If you have a Flickr account you can access the large photo here:

www.flickr.com...

If not, I have downloaded it and put it in my photobucket account, and done nothing to it:

img.photobucket.com...

And I include here a smaller version that I have circled the area of interest for you to look at on the larger photo.



It appears to me to have a contrail behind it.

[edit on 1-26-2008 by Valhall]




posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 03:12 PM
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reply to post by Valhall
 


I see the contrail you mention after I zoom in several times. I see it going left to right. I also see many anomalies in this pic. I guess it has been given a color correction. Might be a good pic to study jpg compression artifacts.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 03:24 PM
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Here's another one with something strange.

June 1942, near TVA Douglas Dam, Tennessee.

Flickr link:

www.flickr.com...

My link:

img.photobucket.com...

Mark up of where to look:



Line coming from horizon up into clouds on a diagonal and appears to have a slight arc to it.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by Valhall
 


I see anomoly you mention. Maybe 60 degrees incline left to right. Nice soft cumulas clouds in this pic. One of the clouds looks like it has been broken apart by some disturbance. Is this photoshop images?



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 03:57 PM
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The first pic looks like it is a chemical error during printing of the pic itself.

Look over to the far left side of the pic and there is another chemical stain.

The second pic looks like a scratch, possibly caused by the edge of the negative as it was pulled from it's container.
The roll (if negatives were on rolls at that time, I'm not sure but just forwarding the theory) can curl up once free from the holder and your left standing there holding a spiraled length of film.

The 'scratch' is very fine and has not totaly destroyed the negative image, hence. This is what has led me to think it was caused by the curling of the roll of film. Anything else may have caused a more deeper and wider scratch.

Nice finds though..well done on spotting those.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 04:08 PM
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Originally posted by aerialview


I see anomoly you mention. Maybe 60 degrees incline left to right. Nice soft cumulas clouds in this pic. One of the clouds looks like it has been broken apart by some disturbance. Is this photoshop images?



lol...No, these are pics from real cameras taken in the 30s and 40s and published by the Library of Congress.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 04:08 PM
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reply to post by Extralien
 


Thanks! Both of your explanations make sense to me.


[edit on 1-26-2008 by Valhall]



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 04:14 PM
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Extralien wrote,



The second pic looks like a scratch, possibly caused by the edge of the negative as it was pulled from it's container.


Would that cause the dark spots in the clouds?



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 04:21 PM
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The dark spots are more than likely caused by

1. Birds

2. dust on the negative or the photographic paper which during the exposure of the negative onto the paper will leave white spots on the paper.

Not until the paper is dipped in the chemicals, washed and exposed to normal daylight will the dark spots appear.

Photographic paper goes completely black if exposed to daylight without being 'fixed' by chemicals.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 04:28 PM
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Good find. I love looking at older photos.

I'm not sure what it is... a little hard to make out. The problem with old photos is that all sorts of things can happen with them as they are moved around etc.

Good eye though.....



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by Valhall
 


should this be in the ufo forum.????



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 04:44 PM
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Originally posted by philjwolf
reply to post by Valhall
 


should this be in the ufo forum.????


I don't know. You got any suggestions?



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 05:12 PM
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Originally posted by Valhall

Originally posted by aerialview


I see anomoly you mention. Maybe 60 degrees incline left to right. Nice soft cumulas clouds in this pic. One of the clouds looks like it has been broken apart by some disturbance. Is this photoshop images?



lol...No, these are pics from real cameras taken in the 30s and 40s and published by the Library of Congress.


How did they become color pictures? I mean, from this era.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 05:16 PM
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There were color cameras in 1943?O_o



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 05:22 PM
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Yeah there were color cameras! The Wizard of Oz came out in 1939 for Pete's Sake. And I'm sure color stills pre-dated that.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 05:28 PM
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Yes there were colour cameras in 1943.

They even used them for video footage of WW2.

Only America had colour cameras as far as I'm aware.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by Extralien
Yes there were colour cameras in 1943.

They even used them for video footage of WW2.

Only America had colour cameras as far as I'm aware.


No, I think the British and Prussians had them too. There is a DVD available called something like WW2 in colour. Most of the footage is British. Amazing to watch.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 05:41 PM
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Originally posted by Valhall
Yeah there were color cameras! The Wizard of Oz came out in 1939 for Pete's Sake. And I'm sure color stills pre-dated that.


Are you sure. I watched The Wizard of Oz on a bw (black & white) tv at least through 1970. Are you saying it was filmed in color?



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 05:42 PM
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Originally posted by aerialview

Are you sure. I watched The Wizard of Oz on a bw (black & white) tv at least through 1970. Are you saying it was filmed in color?


Yes, it was the very first technicolor full-length movie.

(Why do I feel like Cliff Clavin right now?)

P.S. I didn't watch color tv until I was about 10 years old. But the movie was made for the THEATER - not the TV.


[edit on 1-26-2008 by Valhall]



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 06:16 PM
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Originally posted by Valhall

Originally posted by aerialview

Are you sure. I watched The Wizard of Oz on a bw (black & white) tv at least through 1970. Are you saying it was filmed in color?


Yes, it was the very first technicolor full-length movie.

(Why do I feel like Cliff Clavin right now?)

[edit on 1-26-2008 by Valhall]


Who is Cliff Clavin? Sorry for the one line post. We did not have Technicolor theaters where I grew up.




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