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UFOs in Parliament

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posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:23 AM
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09 March 1978
House of Lords Volume 389 written answers column 1033
“UNIDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS
The Earl of CLANCARTY asked Her Majesty’s Government:
Whether since their last reply (Official Report, 1st December, col. 1453) they have now obtained the official transcript of the broadcast on France-Inter radio station, February 1974, when the then French Minister of Defence, Monsieur Robert Galley was interviewed by Jean-Claude Bourret about unidentified flying objects.

Lord WINTERBOTTOM: The Ministry of Defence now has the official transcript oof M Galley’s broadcast 1974. Nothing in it indicates the existence of a threat to the United Kingdom.”




posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:24 AM
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18 January 1979
House of Lords Volume 397, Debate columns 1246-1316
[Cross Refer: “UFOs in the House of Lords – 1979”, published by Her Majesty’s Stationary Office]
[Cross refer – John Michel’s “House of Lords UFO Debate”, Pentacle 1979]
[Cross Refer: “The UFO Encyclopedia” by Margaret Sachs, entry entitled “House of Lords” – page 148 of softback edition]
[Cross Refer : “Beyond Top Secret” by Timothy Good, pages xv-xvi and pages 49-51 of hardback edition]
[Cross Refer : “Above Top Secret” by Timothy Good, pages 11-12 and 72-73 of hardback edition]
[Cross Refer: “The UFO Encyclopedia” by John Spencer – brief entry entitled “House of Lords, All Party UFO Study Group” - page 150 of hardback edition)]
[Cross Refer: “Open Skies, Closed Minds” by Nick Pope – page 54 of paperback edition]

[As noted in the methodology section of this working document, this lengthy debate has been published in book form (and summarised in various accounts, including those cross referred to above). Given its rather considerable length, I have not typed up the text (for at least this preliminary draft of this working document) save for the text of the main contribution by Lord Strabolgi on behalf of the Government (below). For ease of cross-referencing, the references to the main contributions are:
Earl of Clancarty – columns 1246-1253
Lord Trefgarne – columns 1253-1256
Earl of Kimberley – columns 1256-1261
Viscount of Oxfuird – columns 1261-1263
Lord Davies of Leek – columns 1263-1268
Lord Bishop of Norwich – columns 1268-1274
Lord Gladwyn – columns 1274-1279
Lord Kings Norton –columns 1279-1283
Lord Rankeillour – columns 1283-1286
Lord Gainford – columns 1286-1288
Earl of Halsbury – colmns 1288-1295
Lord Hewlett – columns 1295-1301
Earl of Cork and Orrery – columns 1301-1306
Lord Strabolgi – columns 1306-1314
Earl of Clancarty – columns 1314-1316]
[The following is the main contribution by Lord Strablogi during the lengthy debate referred to above.
House of Lords Volume 397, Debate columns 1306-1315]

“10.10pm
Lord Strabolgi: My Lords, I should like to join with the noble Earl, Lord Cork and Orrery, in saying how grateful we are to the noble Earl, Lord Clancarty, for initiating this debate on UFOs. Of course, the subject has been of considerable interest in this country, and I hope our discussions, which, as the noble Earl rightly said, have been the first that we have had in your Lordships’
[House of Lords Volume 397, Debate column 1307]
House, will help to increase public understanding. But before I reply in detail to the debate – and I think it has been a most interesting one – I should like to join with my noble friend Lord Davies of Leek in congratulating the noble Viscount, Lord Oxfuird, on his maiden speech. We were very glad to hear from him, if I may say so, and I hope we shall hear from him again on many other occasions. I shall be referring to some of the detail of his speech later, but at this stage I should like to offer him my warmest congratulations.
There are undoubtedly many strange phenomena in the skies, and it can be readily accepted that most UFO reports are made by calm and responsible people. However, there are generally straight-forward explanations to account for the phenomena, as I think was said by the noble Lord, Lord Trefgarne, speaking for the Opposition – and I must say that I welcomed his constructive speech. There is nothing to convince the Government that there has ever been a single visit by an alien space craft, let alone the number of visits which the noble Earl, Lord Clancarty, claims are increasing all the time. As has been said today, we live in a huge universe. I find as awe-inspiring as Pascal did the contemplation of infinite space. There are some 100,000 million stars in our galaxy alone, which it would take 100,000 years to cross at the speed of light. Beyond our own galaxy, the distances become even more daunting. The light year, as your Lordships know, is about 6 million million miles. The Andromeda galaxy is over 2 million light years away, and that is in our own local group of galaxies! There are, of course, other groups as well.
The evidence suggests that there is no intelligent life on the other planets of our own solar system, as the noble Viscount said. There are, of course, different views about whether there might be life elsewhere in the universe, but certainly there is no serious positive evidence to show that there is. If there were an advanced civilisation elsewhere in the universe, as my noble friend Lord Davies of Leek supposed, with the technology to traverse these colossal distances, there are many questions to be answered. What is the point of this alleged huge number of visits to our planet, over three decades
[House of Lords Volume 397, Debate column 1308]
or more, to no apparent purpose? There seem to be internal inconsistencies in the idea. To put it simply, if these alleged aliens prefer to keep out of the way, the number of reported sightings would surely be only a tiny portion of the actual UFO movements, which would run into many millions. If they do not prefer to pass unnoticed, we could surely expect unmistakable appearances.
Why have they never tried to communicate with us? Why has there been no evidence on radio of attempts at communication? And would not such a large number of movements be picked up by our defence radar system? Why has not a single artefact been found? Assuming that each visit does not represent a journey from a distant star, where are these alien space craft supposed to be hiding? Now that the idea of such bases on the moon or on another planet in our solar system is barely tenable, ufologists have had to claim that the aliens are based in the depths of the sea or in a great hole in the earth, or even that they come from invisible universes and other space-time continua. Anyone who accepts the hypothesis of large numbers of alien visitations seems forced towards explanations that are ever more fantastic, and incapable of either proof or disproof.
As I have said, there really are many remarkable things to see in the sky; and most UFO reports relate to actual phenomena reported by sensible people. But, my Lords, let us consider the phenomena themselves – and the noble Lord, Lord Trefgarne, mentioned some of these. Huge quantities of space debris enter our atmosphere, and are often seen as meteors, and fireballs; bright planets and even the moon or stars have been reported as UFOs, in unusual atmospheric conditions, as the noble Lord, Lord Hewlett, said; there are tricks of light on cloud, and particular cloud structures; there is the Aurora Borealis, St Elmo’s Fire and ball lightning which was referred to by the noble Earl, Lord Halsbury, which has been known to drift along telephone or power lines. There are some 5,000 man-made objects in orbit, satellites and debris, some of which can be seen by the naked eye, some through binoculars. About 600 such man-made objects re-enter the atmosphere every year, as the noble Lord, Lord Hewlett, reminded us. The quantity is far less than natural space
[House of Lords Volume 397, Debate column 1309]
debris, but my Lords, the phenomena can be astonishing.
Last April the Ministry of Defence received reports of a large piece of debris re-entering across the South of England. Most reports were factual, but one spoke of an
‘… oval thing with a white cockpit which hovered for a while then shot off at great speed’.



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:24 AM
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[House of Lords UFO Debate contd]

My Lords, we cannot prove that this was not a UFO, but it occurred at the same time and place as known re-entry of debris.
Many reports relate to aircraft seen in unusual conditions at unusual angles. One recent UFO was confidently reported on local radio. Again, my Lords, we cannot prove that it was not a UFO, but we do know that an RAF Vulcan bomber on a low-flying mission passed the same spot at the same time and on the same course as the reported UFO. Aircraft lights have led to UFO reports; as have distant aircraft with landing lights on – I have seen myself – flares from aircraft, short condensation trails lit by the sun after dusk and light reflected from aircraft. Other phenomena include meteorological balloons. The Meteorological Office alone releases 50 such balloons every day, which expand to 40 ft. in diameter and rise to 100,000 ft. and can be lit by the sun after dark. Many other organisations, such as universities, use balloons, some much larger. Meteorological searchlights shine on clouds: the beam itself cannot be seen; only a point of light in the sky. There are hot air balloons and kites; even birds have been reported as UFOs; lights on distant towers; car headlights on distant hills; dust devils; and airborne debris carried by the wind.
All these phenomena can be mis-interpreted by the most sensible observers, particularly when seen unexpectedly and briefly and in unusual atmospheric conditions. This is what opponents of the natural explanations forget. With distortions of light, and mirages, the most commonplace things can be so changed as to be barely recognisable. For instance, I am told that the US Air Force attributed the 1947 sighting by Arnold described by the noble Earl, Lord Clancarty, to a mirage effect.
Phenomena seen through glass are suspect. There are phenomena generated within the eyeball and there are optical
[House of Lords Volume 397, Debate column 1310]
illusions to which the noble Earl, Lord Halsbury, referred. One scientist, whose task includes watching satellites, describes how, when observing stars near moving clouds he finds it difficult to escape the illusion that the stars are flying past stationary clouds. The noble Earl, Lord Halsbury, referred to the green flash. I used to see it myself in Alexandria when on leave. It was one of our evening pastimes to sit on the promenade and watch it go down over the sea.
My Lords, in 1968, the United States Air Force commissioned the University of Colorado to carry out an independent study into UFO phenomena. Their report, which was published in 1969, was very substantial and detailed and it covered some 50 examples of such phenomena, but added that it was impossible and potentially misleading to try to tabulate all of the possible causes of UFO perception, there are simply too many. The report’s main conclusion was, and I quote:
‘Nothing has come from the study of UFOs in the past 21 years that has added to scientific knowledge.’
The findings of this report were endorsed by a panel of the National Academy of Sciences.
There really are tens of thousands of strange things to be seen. It is the custom to call such phenomena ‘UFOs’, and to transpose this easily into ‘alien space craft’. Often the appearance is too fleeting and the description too imprecise for a particular cause to be attributed. What we can say is that there is a great variety of plain explanations. There is no need, I suggest, for the far-fetched hypothesis of alien space craft.
To genuine sightings we must, however, add hallucinations; the excited tales of the gullible; and the embellishments of the born romantic. There are also indications that ufologists accept reports of UFOs somewhat uncritically. The noble Earl, Lord Clancarty, referred to a papyrus found among the papers of a Professor Tulli recording flying saucers during the reign of Thutmose III. The Colorado Report, which I mentioned earlier, inquired into this story. The alleged papyrus could not be traced, but internal evidence in the translation suggested a fake; inquiries with the Vatican Museum
[House of Lords Volume 397, Debate column 1311]
also suggested that Tulli, an amateur Egyptologist, had been taken in by a fake.
There is a category of UFO cases which are difficult to explain because the description is too vague or the evidence too remote, coupled perhaps with a coincidence of different phenomena and with exceptional conditions. If one accepts that there are natural explanations that could account for most sightings, it is an enormous and irrational jump to claim that the residue of difficult cases constitute alien space craft when there is no positive evidence that they do constitute alien space craft.
I should mention the famous UFO reported over the United Kingdom in December 1978, on New Year’s Eve in fact. This was the one probably seen by the noble Lord, Lord Gainford, to which he referred. The phenomenon was probably the re-entry of a launcher associated with the Russian space satellite COSMOS 1068, launched on 26th December. Of over 100 reports reaching the Ministry of Defence, nearly all were factual and consistent with the re-entry of satellite debris.
The recent sightings in New Zealand referred to by the noble Lord, Lord Kings Norton, attracted worldwide publicity, and we understand that the New Zealand Government may make an announcement when the facts have been assembled and appraised. Preliminary advice from our High Commission in New Zealand shows confident expectation that the sightings will prove to be due to natural phenomena, as I think the noble Lord, Lord Trefgarne, and the noble Earl, Lord Halsbury, implied.
My Lord, the noble Earl who initiated this debate referred to the attitude of other Governments to UFOs. It is not for me to speak in this House for other Governments. I have however already made mention of the United States study in 1968 and I understand that nothing has happened since that time to cause the United States authorities to change their views or to warrant further official investigations of UFOs.
The noble Earl also referred to an interview which the then French Minister of Defence, M. Robert Galley gave in 1974 on the subject of UFOs. The noble
[House of Lords Volume 397, Debate column 1312]
Earl suggested that M. Galley had said that UFOs were real but that he, the Minister, did not know where they came from. I have read the transcript of M. Galley’s broadcast and I also took the trouble to check it in the original French. The essence of what the Minister said was that the phenomena were genuine and were reported by responsible people, but that were aspects that were difficult to explain. Nowhere did the Minister say that UFOs were real in the sense that they represent alien spacecraft, as suggested by the noble Lord, Lord Rankeillour.
The noble Earl, Lord Kimberley, also said that these had been seen by astronauts. These reports by astronauts were examined in the Colorado Study. The astronauts were required, of course, to report anything unusual perceived on their missions; and indeed many strange phenomena were noted. All the phenomena except three were explained. There was nothing at all to suggest that the unexplained sightings were alien spacecraft, and the limited visibility from the small and smeared windows of a spacecraft did not make visual observation easy.
It has been suggested in this debate that our Government are involved in an alleged conspiracy of silence. I can assure your Lordships that the Government are not engaged in any such conspiracy. In view of what the noble Lord, Lord Gainsford, said, I must emphasise that the Ministry of Defence examines any UFO reports received to establish whether they reveal anything of defence interest, but nothing in the reports examined has ever given cause to believe that they represent alien spacecraft.



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:25 AM
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[House of Lords UFO Debate continued]

There is nothing to have a conspiracy of silence about. What is more, a visitor from outer space would be one of the great events in history. It would certainly be an event of stupendous importance, but I hesitate to say the greatest event of all in the presence of my old friend the right reverend Prelate the Bishop of Norwich, whose moving speech we listened to with much interest.
As the noble Earl, Lord Halsbury, said, scientists are rightly inquisitive people. If there was anything in the stories of UFOs, we would expect the scientific community as a whole to be devoting much effort to studying or to making contact with the supposed aliens;
[House of Lords Volume 397, Debate column 1313]
but the idea of a conspiracy of silence by this and other Governments belongs, I suggest, to the world of James Bond.
Then the noble Earl, Lord Kimberley, implied that there was some kind of cover-up. There is no cover-up and no security ban. It is true that when people ask to see the Ministry of Defence UFO files they are told that the papers must remain confidential, but there is a very mundane reason for that. The files contain voluminous correspondence from people, and we cannot divulge the identity of the correspondents. If follows that the files must remain closed under the rules laid down in the Public Record Acts, passed by Parliament, which at present preclude disclosure until 30 years have elapsed since the date of the particular correspondence. The earliest reports the Ministry of Defence hold are dated 1962.
The noble Earl, Lord Clancarty, mentioned the possibility of an intra-governmental study of UFOs. At the United Nations recently representatives of Grenada made statements about UFOs and proposals for a study. A compromise decision was taken, wherein the General Assembly invited ‘interested member states’ to co-ordinate research ‘on a national level’ and to inform the Secretary-General of their findings. The Secretary-General was requested to transmit the Grenadan statements and other relevant reports to the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. This is not an inter-governmental study, in the sense that the noble Earl, Lord Clancarty, is seeking, but he may be content that Grenada, and perhaps some other countries, may be reporting in an international forum.

Lord KINGS NORTON: My Lords, the word was ‘intra’, not ‘inter’.

Lord STRABOLGI: My Lords, I take note of what the noble Lord said. Then it has been suggested, too, in this debate that Her Majesty’s Government should set up a study group. I am glad to say that the noble Lord, Lord Trefgarne, and the noble Lord, Lord Gladwyn, both speaking from the Front Benches for the Opposition Parties, did not support this proposal, and certainly Her Majesty’s Government do not consider that there is any justification for the expenditure of public money on such a study.

[House of Lords Volume 397, Debate column 1314]
I repeat that I am grateful to the noble Earl, Lord Clancarty, for raising the subject of UFOs, and I am particularly grateful for informing me in advance of the points which he proposed to make to your Lordships. However, from all I have said I am sure that your Lordships will agree that there is no reason for my right honourable friend the Secretary of State for Defence to make a broadcast interview about UFOs, as the noble Earl, Lord Clancarty, suggested. As for telling the public the truth about UFOs, the truth is simple. There really are many strange phenomena in the sky and these are invariably reported by rational people. But there is a wide range of natural explanations to account for such phenomena. There is nothing to suggest to Her Majesty’s Government that such phenomena are alien space craft.”



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:26 AM
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1980s

04 March 1982 (Thursday)
House of Lords Volume 427 Oral Answers columns 1370-1371
[Cross Refer : “Beyond Top Secret” by Timothy Good, page 85 of hardback edition]
[Cross Refer : “Above Top Secret” by Timothy Good, page 100 of hardback edition]
[Cross Refer : “Out of the Shadows” by David Clarke and Andy Roberts, page 149 of hardback edition]

“Unidentified Flying Objects : Sightings
3.4 pm
The Early of Clancarty: My Lords, I beg leave to ask the Question which stands in my name on the Order Paper.
The Question was as follows:
To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many reports have been received by the Ministry of Defence on unidentified flying objects (UFOs) in each of the last four years, and what action has been taken in each case.

Viscount Long: My Lords, in 1978 there were 750 sightings; in 1979 there were 550 sightings; in 1980, 350 sightings; and in 1981, 600 sightings. All UFO reports are passed to operational staff who examine them solely for possible defence implications.

The Early of Clancarty: My Lords, while thanking the noble Viscount for that Answer, may I ask him whether or not it is a fact that over 2,000 authenticated UFO reports were published last year in the national press? If so, were they accepted or passed on to the Ministry of Defence? And what happened to them?

Viscount Long: My Lords, they did not all get to the Ministry of Defence. I have just informed your Lordships of the numbers sighted. If the noble Earl is suspicious that the Ministry of Defence is covering up in any way, I can assure him that there is no reason why we should cover up the figures which he has mentioned if they are true. The sole interest of the Ministry of Defence in UFO reports is to establish whether they reveal anything of defence interest – for example, a Russian aircraft or an unidentified aircraft – which might have breached our security systems. That is the sole reason why we are interested in the reports.

Lord Wynne-Jones: My Lords, does the Answer given mean that since there has been a Conservative Government the UFOs have done a U-turn and departed?

Viscount Long: Not according to my reading, My Lords.

The Earl of Kimberly: My Lords, as my noble friend said that 600 UFOs had been officially reported or acknowledged by the Ministry of Defence in 1981, may I ask him how many of those sightings still remain unidentified and were not subject to security, or were Russian aircraft, or anything like that?

[4 March 1982, Written Answers column 1371]

Viscount Long: My Lords, I do not have those figures. They disappeared into the unknown before we got them.

Lord Strabolgi: My Lords, may I ask the noble Viscount whether the present Government adhere to the view of the previous Government which I put forward when I replied to the debate three years ago in your Lordships’ House, that most of these so-called sightings can be accounted for as natural phenomena?

Viscount Long: Yes, My Lords, they can be. Many of them are discounted for in one way or another, but nobody has got a really constructive answer for all of them.

Lord Hill-Norton: My Lords, may I ask the noble Viscount whether or not it is true that all the sighting reports received by the Ministry of Defence before 1962 were destroyed because they were deemed “to be of no interest”? And if it is true, who was it who decided that they were of no interest?

Viscount Long: My Lords, my reply to the noble and gallant Lord – I was wondering whether he was going to say that the Royal Navy had many times seen the Loch Ness monster – is that since 1967 all UFO reports have been preserved. Before that time, they were generally destroyed after five years.

Lord Paget of Northampton: My Lords, can the noble Viscount tell us whether, out of these thousands of sightings which he has mentioned, there has been a single one which suggested any menace to our defences? In the circumstances, is not an awful lot of time being wasted on this nonsense?

Viscount Long: My Lords, I think Her Majesty’s Government are waiting for an invitation from them to discuss these problems.”



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:26 AM
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07 April 1982 (Wednesday)
House of Lords Volume 429 Debate columns 217-219
[Cross Refer : “Beyond Top Secret” by Timothy Good, pages 86-87 of hardback edition]
[Cross Refer : “Above Top Secret” by Timothy Good, page 101 of hardback edition]
[Cross Refer: “UFO Conspiracy” by Jenny Randles, page 194 of hardback edition]

“UFO Sighting Reports: Security

The Early of Cork and Orrery: My Lords, I beg leave to ask the Question which stands in my name on the Order Paper.
The Question was as follows:
To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many of the 2,250 sightings of UFOs reported to the Ministry of Defence in the years 1978-81 were, and still are, classified for reasons of security.

Viscount Long: None, My Lords.

The Early of Cork and Orrery: My Lords, I thank my noble kinsman for that Answer. May I ask him two questions: First, what did he mean when he said in his Answer on, I think, 4th March, that reports of sightings that were considered to be of interest to defence were in fact classified? Secondly, what procedures may be open to individuals or organisations who would like to see the reports?

Viscount Long: My regards, with regard to the latter part of my noble friend’s supplementary question, there is no reason why he should not come and see the reports. Not many of them come in because not many people actually report sightings. There is no cover up in that respect. As for the first part of my noble friend’s supplementary question, I stick to what I said earlier.

The Earl of Kimberley: My Lords, can my noble friend say why, when I previously asked a supplementary question, he said that the figures had got lost on the way to the Ministry, whereas today he says that they are there and available for anyone to see? Can he therefore place them in the Library for all of us to see?

Viscount Long: My Lords, I will look into that and find out whether it is possible for your Lordships to see them. I should like all of your Lordships to see them in the Library, if possible.

Lord Strabolgi: Mr Lords, may I ask the Government whether they think that any of these UFOs are manned spacecraft from a planet outside the solar system, as is believed by the ‘ufologists’?

Viscount Long: My Lords, the noble Lord can believe that; anything is possible.

Lord Shinwell: My Lords, do I understand that the noble Viscount the Minister in his reply to the original Question does not deny that UFOs exist? Is it possible – I use the word ‘possible’ very carefully, but
[Column 218]
deliberately – that all of the information is well-known to the Ministry of Defence, but that for diplomatic and other reasons it is not prepared to make an announcement?

Viscount Long: No, my Lords, it is not prepared to make an announcement because it has not got the facts to make an announcement with authority behind it.

Lord Beswick: My Lords, the Question asks about 2,250 sightings. The noble Viscount says that there are very few sightings reported to the Ministry of Defence. Does that mean to say that the figure in the Question is incorrect?

Viscount Long: No, my Lords, it was on the original assumption that there are probably many more sightings that are not reported to the Ministry of Defence. That is what I was really referring to. Therefore, at this stage what we have said is what we have got.

Lord Beswick: My Lords, I should like to clear up that point. The Question refers to 2,250 sightings ‘reported’ to the Ministry of Defence. The Question I asked was, ‘Is that figure correct, or not?”.

Viscount Long: That is correct, My Lords, up to this moment.

Lord Wade: My Lords, may I ask which Ministry is responsible for UFOs?

Viscount Long: None, my Lords. Reports come into the Ministry of Defence, and anyone can take them from there.

Viscount St. Davids: My Lords, has anybody yet found an empty beer can marked, ‘Made in Centaurus’, or any similar object? Until they have, will the Ministry deal with these matters with very considerable skepticism, please?

Viscount Long: My Lords, I am not the Minister for conservation, if it is a question of beer cans.

Lord Morris: My Lords, if something is said to be unidentified, how can it possibly be said to exist?

Viscount Long: A very good question, my Lords.

Lord Leatherland: My Lords, can the Minister tell us whether any of the unidentified flying objects are Ministers who are fleeing from the Cabinet just now?

Viscount Long: No, my Lords.

The Earl of Clancarty: My Lords, may I ask the noble Viscount whether he is aware of a Ministry of Defence document concerning UFOs, which was published in the July 1978 issue of a journal called Viewpoint Aquarius? Furthermore, is he aware that under the heading of “Contacts” there were listed 18 names, and alongside each name there was given the town which was the location of the supposed occurrence? There were also given classifications and a date and time relating to each name. Is the noble Viscount aware that there was a
[Column 219]
tremendous distribution of the document to other Government departments, and to NORAD and the CIA? I should like to ask whether in this case the word ‘contacts’ means close encounters?

Viscount Long: Yes, my Lords, I have the document here, and has nothing to do with the Ministry of Defence. It is made up to look rather like a Christmas menu. Its existence in the Ministry of Defence has been denied on television. Someone else has made it up. It is not a Ministry of Defence document – not the way it is made up, like a Christmas menu.”



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:26 AM
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24 October 1983 (Monday)
House of Commons, Volume 47 Written Answers column 62
[Cross Refer : “Beyond Top Secret” by Timothy Good, page 68 of hardback edition]
[Cross Refer : “Above Top Secret” by Timothy Good, pages 85-86 of hardback edition]
[Cross refer: “UFO Crash Landing” by Jenny Randles, pages 172 and 212 of softback edition]
[Cross refer: “Out of the Shadows” by David Clarke and Andy Roberts, page 225 of hardback edition]
[Cross refer: “You Can’t tell the People” by Georgina Bruni, page 298 of hardback edition]
[Cross refer : “The UFO Report 1990” edited by Timothy Good, page 36 of hardback edition]
[Cross refer : “UFO Conspiracy” by Jenny Randles, page 194 of hardback edition]
[Cross refer : “Left At East Gate” by Larry Warren & Peter Robbins, page 120 of hardback edition]
[Cross refer : “From Out of the Blue” by Jenny Randles, page 162 of paperback edition]

“RAF Woodbridge (Alleged Incident)
Sir Patrick Wall asked the Secretary of State for Defence (1) if he has seen the United States Air Force memo dated 13 January 1981 concerning unexplained lights near RAF Woodbridge;
(2) whether, in view of the fact that the United State’s Air Force memo of 13 January 1981 on the incident at RAF Woodbridge has been released under the Freedom of Information Act, he will now release reports and documents concerning similar unexplained incidents in the United Kingdom;
(3) how many unexplained sightings or radar intercepts have taken place since 1980.

Mr Stanley: I have seen the memorandum of 13 January 1981 to which my hon. Friend refers. Since 1980 the Department has received 1,400 reports of sightings of flying objects which the observers have been unable to
[Column 62]
identify. There were no corresponding unexplained radar contacts. Subject to normal security constraints, I am ready to give information about any such reported sightings that are found to be a matter of concern from a defence standpoint, but there have been none to date.”



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:26 AM
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9 March 1984
House of Commons, Volume 55 Written Answers column 728
[Cross Refer : “Beyond Top Secret” by Timothy Good, page 93 of hardback edition]
[Cross Refer : “Above Top Secret” by Timothy Good, page 112 of hardback edition]

“Unidentified Flying Objects
Sir Patrick Wall asked the Secretary for State for Defence (1) how many alleged landings by unidentified flying objects have been made in 1980, 1981, 1982 and 1983, respectively; and how many have been investigated by his Department’s personnel;

Mr Lee: I shall reply as soon as possible.”



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:27 AM
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13 March 1984 (Tuesday)
House of Commons, Volume 56 Written Answers columns 132-133
[Cross Refer : “Beyond Top Secret” by Timothy Good, page 94 of hardback edition]
[Cross Refer : “Above Top Secret” by Timothy Good, page 112 of hardback edition]
[Cross refer : “UFO Conspiracy” by Jenny Randles, page 194 of hardback edition]
[Cross refer : “From Out of the Blue” by Jenny Randles, page 163 of paperback edition]

“Unidentified Flying Objects
Sir Patrick Wall asked the Secretary for State for Defence (1) how many alleged landings by unidentified flying objects have been made in 1980, 1981, 1982 and 1983, respectively; and how many have been investigated by his Department’s personnel;

[13 March 1984, written answers column 133]
(2) how many unexplained sightings there have been in 1980, 1981, 1982 and 1983, respectively; and which of these had been traced by radar and with what result.

Mr Lee [Pursuant to his reply, 9 March 1984, c728]: For the years in question, the Ministry of Defence received the following numbers of reports of sightings of flying objects which the observer could not identify: 350, 600, 250, and 390. Reports of alleged landings are not separately identified. The Department was satisfied that none of these reports was of any defence significance and, in such cases, does not maintain records of the extent of its investigations.”



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:27 AM
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15 November 1988 (Tuesday)
House of Commons, Volume 140 Written Answers columns 554-555

“Unidentified Flying Objects
Mr Teddy Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what reports have been received within the past
[column 555]
4 weeks from the south-east about flying objects emitting strong blue lighting; and if there is any information on the origin of the objects.

Mrs Virginia Bottomley: I shall write to my hon. Friend.”



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:27 AM
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11 July 1989
House of Commons, Volume 156 Written Answers column 453
[Cross Refer: “Crop Circles – A Mystery Solved” by Jenny Randles and Paul Fuller, page 95 of softback edition]
“Cereal Fields
Mr Teddy Taylor: To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food how many reports he has received of the flattening of circular areas in cereal fields in the south-west and other areas of England respectively; and if he will make a statement.
Mr Ryder: The flattening of circular areas in cereal fields is a phenomenon known to occur from time to time. It is confined to winter cereal crops and is more prevalent in dry seasons, but we have no arrangements for recording such occurrences and therefore cannot comment on their frequency.”



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:27 AM
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11 July 1989
House of Commons, Volume 156 Written Answers column 500
“Cereal Fields
Mr Teddy Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what progress has been made in the inquiries initiated by Army helicopters based in the south-west in investigating the origin of flattened circular areas of wheat; and if he will make a statement.
Mr Neubert: The Ministry of Defence is not conducting any inquiries into the origins of flattened circular areas of crops. However, we are satisfied that they are not caused by service helicopter activity.”



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:28 AM
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21 July 1989

House of Commons, Volume 157 Written Answers column 408
“Cereal Circles
Mr Teddy Taylor: To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, pursuant to his reply of 11 July, Official Report, column 451, if he has received any scientific or other advice on the causes of the flattening of cereal circles.
Mr Ryder: I am advised that this phenomenom is most likely to result from a combination of wind and local soil fertility conditions in cereals which are prone to lodging.”



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:28 AM
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26 July 1989
House of Commons, Volume 157 Written Answers column 408
“Cornfield Circles
Mr Colvin: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will call for a report from the chief constables of Hampshire and Wiltshire on their investigations into the cornfield circles in Hampshire and Wiltshire; what is the estimated cost of these investigations; and if he will make a statement.
Mr Hurd: I understand from the chief constables of Hampshire and Wiltshire that there have been no investigations into the cornfield circles by their officers.”



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:28 AM
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17 October 1989
House of Commons, Volume 158 Written Answers column 60
“Cornfield Circles:
Mr Colvin: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether any official assistance has been given by service personnel to civilians investigating the origin of cornfield circles in Hampshire and Wiltshire; and if he will make a statement.
Mr Archie Hamilton: I am not aware of any official assistance having been given by service personnel to civilians investigating the origin of crop circles.”



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:28 AM
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18 December 1989
House of Commons, Volume 164 Written Answers column 3

“Near-Miss, London-Belfast Route
Mr Rogers: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he will ask the accident investigation branch to investigate the near-miss involving a civilian aircraft travelling from London to Belfast on the evening of 11 November and then public the results of the inquiry.

Mr McLoughlin: No near-miss, or airmiss, was reported for the date and time referred to. However, a mandatory occurrence report was filed with the Civil Aviation Authority by the captain of the British Midland aircraft en route from London to Belfast.
It is for the chief inspector of air accidents to determine whether an investigation into an incident or accident shall be carried out. I understand that the chief investigator has found no reason for instituting an investigation in this case. It is thought possible that there may be a meteorological explanation to the phenomenon observed.”



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:29 AM
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1990s


30 January 1990 (Tuesday)
House of Commons, Volume 166 Written Answers column 129

“Occurrence Report
Mr Rogers: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what were the contents of the mandatory occurrence report filed with the Civil Aviation Authority by the captain of a British Midland Airways aircraft en route from London to Belfast on Saturday 11 November 1989.

Mr McLoughlin: The pilot reported that at 2028 GMT and whilst descending on airway blue 3 into Belfast following a scheduled flight from Heathrow, as the aircraft passed through 11,200 feet at a position three nautical miles east of Kirkistown, the crew witnessed a ball of light pass overhead the aircraft heading due west. It descended to a position on the port beam where it appeared to burst into a cascade of white and blue magnesium lights. At the time, the aircraft was between two layers of stratus cloud less than 3,000 feet apart. Another aircraft in the vicinity witnessed the light, and it was reported to Belfast air traffic control.
I refer the hon. Member to my answer of 18 December 1989 to his earlier question on this matter at column 3.”



1993


14 December 1993 (Tuesday)
House of Commons, Volume 234 Written Answers columns 571-572

“Unidentified Flying Objects

Sir Teddy Taylor : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on the treaty powers which enabled the European Parliament's trade, research and technology committee to study and spend public resources on unidentified flying objects and the possibility of aliens being present in the asteroid belt ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Goodlad : I understand that a member of the energy, research and technology committee has reported to the Committee on research being undertaken in Europe on unidentified flying objects and related phenomena, following a European Parliament resolution on the subject. A proposal for Community research in this field has not been put forward ; nor would I expect one to be unless such research were shown to be consistent with treaty objectives.

Sir Teddy Taylor : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if the proposal by the EC trade, research and technology committee that an organisation on the consideration of unidentified flying objects should be assigned Community status and funding will be subject to a decision of the Council of Ministers.

Mr. Goodlad : The Commission has not made a proposal for the establishment of an unidentified flying objects research observatory. Were it to do so, I can assure my hon. Friend that the Council of Ministers would have to agree rules concerning implementation, funding and duration of the programme, in accordance with the treaty articles concerning research activities.

Sir Teddy Taylor : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if the EC Commission has the powers on its own initiative to give funding to the Euro-unidentified flying objects observation centre

[14 December 1993 written answers column 572]
recommended by the European Parliament’s trade, research and technology committee; and is he will make a statement.

Mr. Goodlad : No. Detailed rules concerning implementation, funding and duration of specific Community research programmes must be agreed by the Council of Ministers. The Commission could not fund a Euro unidentified flying objects observation centre in the absence of a Council decision to do so.”


15 December 1993 (Wednesday)
House of Commons, Volume 234 Written Answers column 682
“Aliens
Sir Teddy Taylor: To ask the President of the Board of Trade if he will seek to obtain a report of the European Parliament Trade and Research Technology Committee’s conclusion that the theory that aliens are present in the asteroid belt cannot be ruled out; and what are the implications of this conclusion for public policy

Mr McLoughlin [holding answer 14 December 1993]: My officials have seen the report to which my hon. Friend refers by the European Parliament’s Committee on Energy, Research and Technology. It has no implications for public policy.”


1994

07 December 1994 (Wednesday)
House of Lords Volume 559 Written Answers column 90

“Unidentified Flying Objects

Right Hon. Lord Mason of Barnsley: To what extent official records are kept of sightings of unidentified flying objects, especially those sightings that may have a bearing on the air defence of this country; whether units of the Ministry of Defence, especially RAF units, have standing instructions to report sightings of unusual flying objects; whether reports are logged; and whether these can now be made public.

Lord Henley: My department evaluates reports of unexplained phenomena solely in order to establish whether they may have any defence significance. Reports are received from a wide range of sources, including the police and general public, as well as the RAF, which in the context of its air defence responsibilities has standing instructions to report all sightings of unexplained aerial phenomena. Reports are placed on departmental files in the normal way and are therefore subject to the Public Records Act several files on this subject are available for viewing at the Public Record Office.”


[edit on 23-1-2008 by IsaacKoi]



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:30 AM
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1996

07 May 1996 (Tuesday)
House of Commons Volume 277 Written Answers Columns 19-20

“Unidentified Objects, (Rendlesham Forest)
Mr Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what is the current security classification on the documents his Department holds on the unidentified objects seen by members of the United States Armed Forces in Rendlesham Forest, Suffolk in 1980; and if he will make a statement. [27644]

[Column 20]
Mr Soames: The papers held by my Department relating to the alleged events at Rendlesham forest, Suffolk in 1980 are unclassified.”




10 June 1996 (Monday)
House of Commons Volume 270 Written Answers Column 42
“Unidentified Objects (Rendlesham Forest)

Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to his answer of 7th May, Official Report, columns 19-20, if he will list the titles of the papers held by his Department in respect of unidentified objects seen in Rendlesham Forest, Suffolk; and if he will make a statement. [31490]

Mr. Soames: Apart from a report of the events written at the time by the United States Air Force deputy base commander at RAF Woodbridge, which has been in the public domain for a number of years, the documents held by my Department are internal staffing papers and correspondence from members of the public relating to the alleged events.”



08 July 1996 (Monday)
House of Commons Volume 281 Written Answers Column 26

“Unidentified Flying Objects

Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which office within his Department deals with sightings of unidentified flying objects. [35845]

Mr. Soames: The focal point within my Department for reports of sightings of unidentified flying objects is Secretariat(Air Staff)2a.

Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list by (a) date and (b) location for the last 10 years unexplainable sightings of unidentified flying objects received by his Department; and what action was subsequently taken. [35844]

Mr. Soames: My Department evaluates reports of "unexplained" aerial phenomena solely in order to establish whether they may have any defence significance. Unless there is evidence to indicate that the UK air defence region may have been compromised, and to date no sighting has provided such evidence, my Department does not investigate or seek to provide an explanation for what was observed. The question of unexplainable sightings has not therefore arisen.”



24 July 1996 (Wednesday)
House of Commons Volume 282 Written Answers Columns 423-424
[Cross refer: “You Can’t tell the People” by Georgina Bruni, page 298 of hardback edition]

“Rendlesham Forest (Incident)

Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what response his Department made to the report submitted by Lieutenant Colonel Charles Halt
[24 July 1996 : Column 424]
relating to events in Rendlesham forest in December 1980; what interviews were held; and if he will make a statement; [39247]
(2) who assessed that the events around RAF Woodbridge and RAF Bentwaters in December 1980, which were reported to his Department by Lieutenant Colonel Charles Halt were of no defence significance; on what evidence the assessment was made; what analysis of events was carried out; and if he will make a statement. [39249]

Mr. Soames: The report was assessed by the staff in my Department responsible for air defence matters. Since the judgment was that it contained nothing of defence significance no further action was taken.”




24 July 1996
House of Commons Volume 282 Written Answers Column 424
[Cross Refer: “Out of the Shadows” by David Clarke and Andy Roberts, page 245 of hardback edition]
[Cross refer : “A Covert Agenda” by Nick Redfern, pages 177-178 of hardback edition]

“Uncorrelated Radar Tracks (Investigations)

Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence on how many occasions RAF aircraft have been (a) scrambled and (b) diverted from task to investigate uncorrelated targets picked up on radar; and if he will make a statement. [39218]

Mr. Soames: In the past five years RAF aircraft have been scrambled or diverted from task on two occasions to intercept and identify uncorrelated radar tracks entering the United Kingdom air defence region.”


24 July 1996
House of Commons Volume 282 Written Answers Column 424
[Cross Refer: “Out of the Shadows” by David Clarke and Andy Roberts, page 245 of hardback edition]

“Unidentified Craft
Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what is his Department's assessment of the incident that occurred on 5 November 1990 when a patrol of RAF Tornado aircraft flying over the North sea were overtaken at high speed by an unidentified craft; and if he will make a statement; [39245]
(2) if he will make a statement on the unidentified flying object sighting reported to his Department by the meteorological officer at RAF Shawbury in the early hours of 31 March 1993. [39246]
Mr. Soames: Reports of sightings on these dates are recorded on file and were examined by staff responsible for air defence matters. No firm conclusions were drawn about the nature of the phenomena reported but the events were not judged to be of defence significance.
Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment his Department made of the photograph of an unidentified craft at Calvine on 4 August 1990; who removed it from an office in secretariat (air staff) 2a; for what reasons; and if he will make a statement. [39248]

Mr. Soames: A number of negatives associated with the sighting were examined by staff responsible for air defence matters. Since it was judged that they contained nothing of defence significance the negatives were not retained and we have no record of any photographs having been taken from them.





16 October 1996 (Wednesday)
House of Commons, Volume 282 Written Answers column 919
[Cross Refer: “Cosmic Crashes” by Nick Redfern, page 189 of hardback edition]

“Unidentified Flying Objects
Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) what consultation has taken place in each of the last five years by his Department with the French Service de Documentation Exterieur et de Contre-Espionnage in respect of unidentified flying objects; and if he will make a statement; [40970]
(2) if he will list by month for each of the last 10 years, and this year to date, the number of occasions that MI6 has monitored unidentified flying objects investigations; and if he will make a statement; [40981]
(3) if he will list by month for each of the last 10 years and this year to date the number of occasions on which the Government Communications headquarters has monitored unidentified flying object investigations; and if he will make a statement. [40922]

Mr. David Davis: I shall write to the hon. Member shortly. Copies of the letter will be placed in the Libraries of the House.”

[edit on 23-1-2008 by IsaacKoi]



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:31 AM
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17 October 1996 (Thursday)
House of Commons Volume 282 written answers column 1080

“Unidentified Flying Objects
Mr. Redmond: To ask the Prime Minister if he will allocate to a department the assessments of the non-air defence implications associated with unidentified flying objects; and if he will make a statement. [40822]

The Prime Minister: The air defence and air traffic implications of unidentified flying objects are the responsibility of the Ministry of Defence and the Civil Aviation Authority respectively. The Government have no plans to allocate resources to researching extraterrestrial phenomena.”






17 October 1996
House of Commons Volume 282 Written Answers column 1089

“Mr. Nicholas Pope
Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence to what post Mr. Nicholas Pope was appointed by his Department after his tour of duty with Secretariat (Air Staff) Department 2A; and if he will make a statement. [40920]

Mr. Soames: Mr. Nicholas Pope was posted on promotion two years ago to a general finance policy branch.”


17 October 1996
House of Commons Volume 282 Written Answers column 1090
[Cross Refer: “Cosmic Crashes” by Nick Redfern, pages 224-225 of hardback edition]

“RAF Rudloe Manor
Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what work is currently undertaken at RAF Rudloe Manor; what work was undertaken in the last 10 years; what was, by rank, the establishment for the last 10 years; and if he will make a statement. [40823]

Mr. Soames: I will write to the hon. Member and a copy of the letter will be placed in the Library of the House.”




17 October 1996
House of Commons Volume 282 Written Answers column 1090
[Cross Refer: “Cosmic Crashes” by Nick Redfern, page 88 of hardback edition]

"Defence Intelligence Branches
Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what is the current function of DI55 SIG; what was its function (a) five years and (b) 10 years ago; and if he will make a statement; [41040]
(2) what is the current function of DI65B; what was its function (a) five years and (b) 10 years ago; and if he will make a statement; [41038]
(3) what is the current function of DI55; what was its function (a) five years and (b) 10 years ago; and if he will make a statement; [41041]
(4) what is the current function of DI61E; what was its function (a) five years and (b) 10 years ago; and if he will make a statement; [41037]
(5) what is the current function of DI10; what was its function (a) five years and (b) 10 years ago; and if he will make a statement. [41039]

Mr. Soames: I will write to the hon. Member and a copy of the letter will be placed in the Library of the House.”


17 October 1996
House of Commons Volume 282 Written Answers column 1090
[Cross Refer: “Cosmic Crashes” by Nick Redfern, pages 226-227 of hardback edition]

“Unidentified Flying Objects
Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what consultation has taken place in each of the last five years by his Department with the French Ministry of Defence Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales in respect of unidentified flying objects; and if he will make a statement; [41048]

(2) if a lodger unit housed within his Department's Flying Complaints Flight specialises in unidentified flying object investigations; and if he will make a statement;[41036]

(3) how many records currently held by his Department's Scientific Intelligence Branch are under extended closure for (a) 50 years, (b) 75 years and (c) 100 years; how many of these records refer to unidentified flying objects; and if he will make a statement; [40911]

[17 October 1996: Column: 1091]
(4) what consultation has taken place in each of the last five years by his Department with the Royal Australian air force in respect of unidentified flying objects; and if he will make a statement; [41042]

(5) what consultation has taken place in each of the last five years by his Department with the Spanish Ministry of Defence's intelligence section of the Spanish air forces air operations command in respect of unidentified flying objects; and if he will make a statement; [41050]

(6) if he will make statement on his Department's policy towards unidentified flying objects and on how this has developed during the past 30 years; [40913]

(7) what co-operation there is between the Royal Air Force and the United States air force in respect of establishing the facts relating to unidentified flying objects; and if he will make a statement; [40918]

(8) how many alleged landings by unidentified flying objects have been recorded in each year since 1980 and this year to date; how many have been investigated by his Department's personnel; which of these had been traced by radar and with what result; and if he will make a statement; [40921]

(9) what consultation has taken place in each of the last five years by his Department with the Italian Ministry of Defence air force general staff (2. Department) in respect of unidentified flying objects; and if he will make a statement; [41049]

(10) what instructions have been sent to the commanders of Royal Air Force stations to collect reports from air crews having allegedly sighted unidentified flying objects; what inquiries have been held following such sightings; to what extent there has been collaboration between his Department and departments in (a) Canada and (b) the United States of America on this problem; and if he will make a statement; [40917]

(11) what consultation has taken place in each of the last five years by his Department with New Zealand's Ministry of Defence in respect of unidentified flying objects; and if he will make a statement; [41043]

(12) what consultation has taken place in each of the last five years by his Department with the Portuguese Ministry of Defence's joint staff of the armed forces intelligence division in respect of unidentified flying objects; and if he will make a statement; [41051]

(13) how many instances of unidentified flying objects have been reported on by the defence services of the United Kingdom during the last 12 months; what steps are taken to co-ordinate such observations; and if he will make a statement; [40910]

(14) if he will list by year for the last 30 years how many structured craft of unknown origin have penetrated the United Kingdom's air defence region; and if he will make a statement. [40919]

Mr. Soames: I will write to the hon. Member and a copy of the letter will be placed in the Library of the House.”





17 October 1996
House of Commons Volume 282 Written Answers column 1093
[Cross refer: “Cosmic Crashes” by Nicholas Redfern, pages 16-17 and 88 of hardback edition]

“Mr. Nicholas Redfern
Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list the titles of the records of the Ministry of Defence's scientific intelligence branch in respect of correspondence sent to Mr. Nicholas Redfern by the Public Record Office, Kew on 21 September 1990.[40889]

Mr. Soames: I will write to hon. Member and a copy of the letter will be placed in the Library in the House.”




[edit on 23-1-2008 by IsaacKoi]



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 06:31 AM
link   
05 November 1996 (Tuesday)
House of Commons Volume 284 Written Answers Column 409
[Cross Refer: “Out of the Shadows” by David Clarke and Andy Roberts, page 127 of hardback edition]

“Unidentified Flying Craft
Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list the reports of encounters by Royal Air Force pilots with unidentified flying craft since 1966 which have not been released to the public; on what grounds they have been retained; and if he will make a statement. [2201]

Mr. Soames: The information could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what is the Royal Air Force's practice as regards investigating sightings of unidentified flying craft which correlate with radar information; if there is a requirement to investigate such phenomena by scrambling aircraft; and if he will make a statement. [2200]

Mr. Soames: Unidentified contacts penetrating UK airspace or the UK air defence region are identified by all available means, including interception.”



11 November 1996 (Monday)
House of Commons Volume 285 Written Answers Columns 25-26

“Unidentified Flying Objects

Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement on the circumstances of the two occasions referred to in his answer of 24 July, Official Report, column 424, when RAF aircraft were scrambled or diverted from task to investigate uncorrelated radar targets; if the objects were identified;
11 Nov 1996 : Column: 26
if it was judged that breaches of United Kingdom airspace had occurred; and if he will list all similar incidents which have occurred since 1979. [2932]

Mr. Soames: The targets were identified as Russian maritime patrol aircraft and were in the northern portion of the UK air defence region. They did not penetrate UK airspace. Information covering the period from 1979 is not held in a readily available form and could be provided only at disproportionate cost and effort.

Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence when United Kingdom military personnel were briefed about the scrambling of Belgian F-16 aircraft on 30 and 31 March 1990; when the unidentified flying object concerned was detected on United Kingdom radar systems; and if RAF aircraft were scrambled. [3185]

Mr. Soames: The Belgian authorities did not notify adjacent countries because no threat was perceived. There is no evidence of radar contacts within the UK air defence system.”


11 November 1996 (Monday)
House of Commons Volume 285 Written Answers Column 26

“Radiation
Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if the radiation readings, reported to his Department by Lieutenant Colonel Charles Halt on 13th January 1981, were judged to have posed any threat to Lieutenant Colonel Halt and his team; who assessed the readings; how the radiation compared with background radiation in the area; and if he will make a statement. [2934]

Mr. Soames: There is no record of any official assessment of the radiation readings reported by Lieutenant Colonel Halt.”


12 November 1996 (Tuesday)
House of Commons Volume 285 Written Answers Columns 111-112

“DEFENCE
Unidentified Flying Objects
Mr. Redmond: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what factors underlay his Department's decision that the reported sightings of unidentified flying objects on 5 November 1990 and 31 March 1993 were not of defence significance; [2898]
(2) for what reasons his Department assessed the sightings of an unidentified flying object over RAF Shawbury, referred to in his answer of 24 July, Official Report, column 424, as having no defence significance.[2928]

[12 November 1996: Written Answers Column 112]

Mr. Soames: I refer the hon. Member to the answer that I gave him on 8 July 1996, Official Report, column 26.”







18 December 1996
House of Commons Volume 287 Written Answers Column 626
“Extraterrestrial Phenomena

Mr Ieuan Wyn Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make it his policy to allocate resources to researching extraterrestrial phenomena. [9419]

Mr Soames: I have nothing to add to reply given by my Right Hon. Friend the Prime Minister on 17 October 1996, Official Report, column 1082.”


18 December 1996
House of Commons Volume 287 Written Answers Column 628-629
“Unidentified Craft
Mr Ieuan Wyn Jones: To ask the Secretary of state for Defence if his Department will adopt a policy on the reporting of unidentified craft of releasing to the press details of (i) shape, flight-pattern, colour and size of craft, (ii) where and when the craft was seen, (iii) what action his Department took and (iv) the radar profile of the craft.

Mr Soames: No.

Mr Jones: To ask the secretary of State for Defence what assessment his Department has made of the incident on 16 October 1990 involving two unidentified craft in the vicinity of Wylfa nuclear power station on Anglesey; what estimate the intercepting helicopter pilots made of the departing speeds of the two unidentified craft; if they showed up on radar; and if he will make a statement. [9561]

Mr Soames: None, so far as we can establish from existing records.

Mr Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment his Department has made of the two attempted interceptions of unidentified craft that occurred near Anglesey in September and November 1995; what other attempts have been made to intercept unidentified craft in this vicinity; and if he will make a statement [9562]

Mr Soames: From records available, and from the limited information given in the question, we are unable to identify any incidents of this kind.”



18 December 1996
House of Commons Volume 287 Written Answers Column 661
“Civilian Pilots
Mr Ieuan Wyn Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what training is provided to pilots of civilian aircraft on what to do in the event of encountering unidentified craft which do not show up on radar. [9563]

Mr Bowis: Matters relating to the training of civil aircrew are the responsibility of the Civil Aviation Authority. I have asked the chairman of that authority to write to the hon. Member.”



18 December 1996
House of Commons Volume 287 Written Answers Column 661
“Ringway Airport
Mr Ieuan Wyn Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment his Department has made of the incident that occurred at 6.48pm to flight 5061 on its descent into Ringway Airport, Manchester on the night of 6 January 1995; and if he will make a statement. [9581]

Mr Bowis: This incident was assessed by the joint airmiss working group, consisting of representatives from both civil and military aviation. The group found that both the degree of risk and the cause of the incident were unassessable. Full details are contained in joint airmiss working group report No. 1/95 – January 1995 to April 1995, which is available from the Library.”



[edit on 23-1-2008 by IsaacKoi]



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