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Asteroid 2007 TU24 has NASA concerned.

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posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 05:59 AM
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I followed the first 5 pages and I've read back 5 pages from here.

Where I stay there's only 5 hrs to the 29 but I still haven't found out --and that's what it all comes down to-- where is this object supposed to pass or hit, and at about what time will it happen?

IOW, what part of the sky to look for it, and at what time?

Is it --should be-- calculated by now?




posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 06:00 AM
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Don't assume I'm completely ignorant. I did a little bit of research, and Ive been to that site. My question was simply how , or perhaps when, we would know where it may hit. If it was going to. I'm sorry I may not be as smart as you but I'm not stupid. I know a rock that size isnt going to kill us all. I was just curious about where it may hit.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 06:02 AM
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what are you all Babbling on about, it's goint to miss us by over 600k. Thats nearly twice the distance to the moon.

Relax, and take a chill pill...



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 06:15 AM
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There are other numbers... but based on NEODys' Earth MOID,

E MOID x AU = E MOID in Statute Miles... 0.00099AU x 92955887.6mi = 92026.632872 miles

20 hours 20 minutes to closest approach at 8:33UTC on the 29th.

Cheers,

Vic

EDIT: UTC clock link.

[edit on 28-1-2008 by V Kaminski]



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 06:47 AM
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reply to post by n7ekg
 

God dude, I sat and thought about this very thing.. telling my girlfriend. I haven't concluded what to do yet. My girlfriend is VERY skeptical about this whole website, so I'm not sure she would care one way or the other. However, I would feel terrible if this did come to pass and I hadn't warned her about it.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 07:05 AM
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I've had another look over the Internet, and for those who wish to watch it pass us here is some information...


The asteroid will reach an approximate apparent magnitude 10.3 on Jan. 29-30 before quickly becoming fainter as it moves farther from Earth. On that night, the asteroid will be observable in dark and clear skies through amateur telescopes with apertures of at least 7.6 centimeters (three inches). An object with a magnitude of 10.3 is about 50 times fainter than an object just visible to the naked eye in a clear, dark sky.


So not visible with the naked eye. Sorry to be the bearer of bad tidings.




peace..

[edit on 28-1-2008 by ZX 81]



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 07:12 AM
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reply to post by CPYKOmega
 


You may wish to double check your impact velocity input.

You've got it at about twice what ArMap calculated in his revised estimate.


A little too fast I think, no?






[edit on 28-1-2008 by goosdawg]



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 07:41 AM
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This will go past unnoticed by most, nothing will happen and Ill be here tomorrow to laugh this care mongering off



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 07:56 AM
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This asteroid is going to be PAST the moon. Many, MANY miles. That is why you will not be able to see it with the naked eye. If you would use your common sense, you would realize that in order to see the roid it would have to be basically right there next to the moon. How you like them apples? Actually, no. Just continue to scare people into your way of thinking without taking other people's ideas into consideration.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 07:58 AM
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reply to post by V Kaminski
 


Thanks for the UTC clock link, bookmarked it yesterday.

Handy little utility.

It'll be about half after midnight here in SoCal.

Right now, it's just about eighteen and a half hours until TU24's CA.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 08:01 AM
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Now I'm confused...again.

Vic...someone...can you please look at this site

2007-T86

Why does 2007 TU24 also have designations as

2007 T86
and
2007 T85
2007 T87

All these refer in the data to 2007 TU24 using a different name. The information on this shows

2007 TU24 PHA, Earth MOID = 0.0020 AU

Cornfused....



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 08:01 AM
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Today:

E MOID .0012507 AU



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 08:07 AM
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reply to post by DancedWithWolves
 


Don't be confused. It still misses even with the most pessimistic data... I choose to use NEODys because their numbers are about "the most dire" and they still don't differ from Harvard's all that much. If I was to use NASA's numbers... hey wait, what NASA numbers? I'll use NEODys - they are on the job anyway. Not that NASA/JPL isn't. Wink.

Cheers,

Vic

[edit on 28-1-2008 by V Kaminski]



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 08:09 AM
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reply to post by khunmoon
 


Kunmoon, way back when on this thread, I read that it will be coming from the area around the constellation of Casseiopeia.

I am from central Arizonia, so I looked it up on my Starry Night program, and it is between N and NW very low on the horizon at about 20 degrees. It's supposed to look like a no10 grade star (don't know what that is), but it's very doable with a backyard telescope.

Hope this helps.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 08:09 AM
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reply to post by DancedWithWolves
 


Only MPEC 2007-T86 refers to 2007 TU24

MPEC 2007-T85 refers to 2007 TT24

And MPEC 2007-T87 refers to 2007 TV24

Other than that, I have no idea what all that means.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 08:18 AM
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reply to post by goosdawg
 


The weird part was you get to all three from

2007 TU24 in chart

It is toward the very bottom so they must all three be related to 2007 TU24 somehow. Hello...now our asteroid's get an alias. Pffff


edit: actually the list goes on and on and on of designations....not sure what it means either...may be irrelevant.

[edit on 28-1-2008 by DancedWithWolves]



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 08:39 AM
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You need to not worry so much, dont let this ruin anything. when it hits and if it hits then you worry, but until that day. keep on living like there is nothing to worry about. youll only work yourself up over nothing.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 08:41 AM
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Soooo... Today is the big day huh? Anyone notice anything yet? Here in Holland everything is still the same. Bummer. I was looking forward to some action.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 08:43 AM
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reply to post by DancedWithWolves
 


Whoa, now that's a lot of numbers!!


No wonder we're confused!!


!7 hours and 50 minutes to go....



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 08:46 AM
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what's this talk about unusual weather? I thought the asteroid, if it does come close enough to affect us on earth without impact would only cause disruptions in the geomagnetic fields... meaning power and communications disruptions. How exactly does this affect regular weather, such as rain, snow, etc?

I'd be looking for widespread power outages and communications disruptions for signs that this asteroid is getting too close, not if it is unusually warm or cold..



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