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Asteroid 2007 TU24 has NASA concerned.

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posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 12:56 PM
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reply to post by dgtempe
 



Dgtempe, could you post the links you used, I'd like to take a look at them too. Good job translating!




posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by whoreallyknows
 


Thanks for the link. Very interesting

I'll keep reading and watching.

[edit on 26-1-2008 by whoreallyknows]



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by mungodave
 



The data on this map can be used to get an estimate of the corrections to be applied to satellite navigation measurements to account for the extra delay in the transmission of the radio signals between the satellite and a receiver on earth due to the presence of the ionosphere.


www.ips.gov.au...

I am not sure how to read the data but, the caption at the bottom is remarkable. Delays... which means the data could be off by hours or days or even weeks depending upon when they look and or update. The last I heard they felt observations were no longer needed.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:07 PM
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reply to post by whoreallyknows
 

I could not link it, but i ended up doing a latest asteroid impact google search in Spanish and i ended up with: www.noticiascristianas.com
Sorry.


Hmmm... i'm beginning to think this is printed in the US. They refer to NASA as saying that the asteroid will not impact earth. I will keep on looking for news printed outside the US.

[edit on 26-1-2008 by dgtempe] How the hell is there such a chance of impact but yet the probability of hitting is 0?????

[edit on 26-1-2008 by dgtempe]



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:08 PM
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Yes some links to the specific data would be a groove. Google advanced search with that addy and excerpts of dg's posted data turns up zero. I may just be missing something obvious.

63%? Uh, no. Show us the data please. 3 or 4 pieces? Uh, no... not yet anyway. Who's radio-telescopic telemetry data are they using? From when.

Cheers,

Vic

[edit on 26-1-2008 by V Kaminski]



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:22 PM
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ARECIBO: G = 10.00 K/Jy, Tsys = 25.0 K, P = 900 kW, elev >= 70.3 deg, unhopped

Monostatic
UTC Dist. # SNR/ SNR/
start date window RA Dec (AU) runs day run
----------------------------------------------------------------------
2008 Jan 27 20:25-21:21 12 0 0.009 95 410000 44000
2008 Jan 28 20:07-22:31 22 30 0.004 315 11x10^6 649000
...too far north for Arecibo to track on Jan. 29-31

I don't know, Arecibo is showing an AU of 0.004 on the 28th

That's pretty close isn't it?

Closest approach for an object this size until 2027. Wow



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:22 PM
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I received some links from my astronomy club about this asteroid for those that want to try to view it along with more info on the close approach. I haven't read the whole thread, so I don't know if anyone has posted this yet.

This article has a decent map of it's track. across the sky, but at mag 11 it will be difficult to find.

www.skyandtelescope.com...

This was an e-mail sent out by NASA two days ago.


NEWS RELEASE: 2008-012 Jan. 24, 2008

Asteroid to Make Rare Close Flyby of Earth January 29

Scientists are monitoring the orbit of asteroid 2007 TU24. The asteroid, believed to be between 150 meters (500 feet) and 610 meters (2,000 feet) in size, is expected to fly past Earth on Jan. 29, with its closest distance being about 537,500 kilometers (334,000 miles) at 12:33 a.m. Pacific time (3:33 a.m. Eastern time). It should be observable that night by amateur astronomers with modest-sized telescopes.

Asteroid 2007 TU24 was discovered by the NASA-sponsored Catalina Sky Survey on Oct. 11, 2007. Scientists at NASA's Near-Earth Object Program Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., have determined that there is no possibility of an impact with Earth in the foreseeable future.

"This will be the closest approach by a known asteroid of this size or larger until 2027," said Don Yeomans, manager of the Near Earth Object Program Office at JPL. "As its closest approach is about one-and-a-half times the distance of Earth to the moon, there is no reason for concern. On the contrary, Mother Nature is providing us an excellent opportunity to perform scientific observations."

Asteroid 2007 TU24 will reach an approximate apparent magnitude 10.3 on Jan. 29-30 before quickly becoming fainter as it moves farther from Earth. On that night, the asteroid will be observable in dark and clear skies through amateur telescopes with apertures of at least 7.6 centimeters (3 inches). An object with a magnitude of 10.3 is about 50 times fainter than an object just visible to the naked eye in a clear, dark sky.

NASA detects and tracks asteroids and comets passing close to Earth. The Near Earth Object Observation Program, commonly called "Spaceguard," discovers, characterizes and computes trajectories for these objects to determine if any could be potentially hazardous to our planet.

For more information, visit neo.jpl.nasa.gov....


This is a link for JPL NEO page, which has more articles, one with some photos of the object.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:26 PM
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reply to post by phoenix103
 



Of course it does, we're increasingly investing in technology, processes and people for detecting these.


It does not change the facts.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:30 PM
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They knew about this asteroid since October 11,2007, yet they say this will be it untill 2027. Does anyone really believe that ...? Me neither.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:30 PM
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Goldstone is up and has the Aricebo tracking along with others.

It shows some interesting data.

Why is it when anyone here reports a much closer approach someone always posts and counters with the bogus 'don't worry" NASA statement?

That always bothers me.

Anyhow, check out Goldstone for up to the date info on this "passing" one mile wide rock



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:32 PM
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Originally posted by arizonascott
Goldstone is up and has the Aricebo tracking along with others.

It shows some interesting data.

Why is it when anyone here reports a much closer approach someone always posts and counters with the bogus 'don't worry" NASA statement?

That always bothers me.

Anyhow, check out Goldstone for up to the date info on this "passing" one mile wide rock


Any links?



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:41 PM
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I APOLOGIZE.

In my quest for the truth be it English or Spanish, i came across a website i referred to before and a distinguished member just u2u'd me and pointed out ITS THE WRONG ASTEROID- wrong year, wrong everything.

Please disregard my posts about www.noticiascristianas.com

I thought it was "fresh" news.

Sorry.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:44 PM
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Goldstone link

echo.jpl.nasa.gov...

However word must be out, because I just went on again and the high traffic has them down. Word travels fast.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:46 PM
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Originally posted by arizonascott
Goldstone link

echo.jpl.nasa.gov...

However word must be out, because I just went on again and the high traffic has them down. Word travels fast.



You're right. That can't be good.



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:53 PM
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From NEODys Non-NASA for those who think that may be a significant issue. There are some links to graphics. Another source is Spaceguard.

Observation: Jan 26 09:14UTC Earth MOID (AU) = 0.00099 Same as yesterday. Which is good as the day before it was 0.0012501 and looked like it might deviate even more. It has not. Tomorrow's data should really be about all she wrote. The media show has been very interesting. If the E MOID value goes beneath four zeros to the right of the decimal place?

It'd be great if all the links somehow floated with the last page of a thread. What would be even better if this event and others like it were used to prompt pro-active international co-operative change in respect to NEO detection and management where we can do something more than watch the universe hurtling at us.

A trip to an asteroid with a remotely and autonomically commanded gravity tractor might be a good thing to spend some money on while heading back to the Moon. Lotta folks goin' to the Moon. Busy place maybe? LOL.

Cheers,

Vic

[edit on 26-1-2008 by V Kaminski]



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 01:57 PM
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reply to post by V Kaminski
 


It has been determined that the asteroid will not hit, however, I think there is something they are not telling us. I am not sure exactly what the following means, but, it is an ALERT from NOAH. Some of the experts on this forum please take a look.


Product: SWPC Space Weather Alerts ALTS.txt
:Issued: 2008 Jan 26 1929 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# See swpc.noaa.gov... for description and other displays
# Send comments and suggestions to SWPC.Webmaster@noaa.gov
#
# SWPC Space Weather Alerts Issued in the last 24 hours
#---------------------------------------------------------------------

Space Weather Message Code: ALTEF3
Serial Number: 1448
Issue Time: 2008 Jan 26 1413 UTC

ALERT: Electron 2MeV Integral Flux exceeded 1000pfu
Threshold Reached: 2008 Jan 26 1400 UTC
Station: GOES12
Observed Yesterday: Yes
Yesterday Maximum 2MeV Flux: 1350 pfu

#-------------------------------------------------


www.swpc.noaa.gov...



The geomagnetic field is expected to be quiet during 23 - 31 January.
Activity is expected to increase to unsettled to active levels on 01
- 02 February due to the onset of a recurrent coronal hole
high-speed stream. Quiet to unsettled conditions are expected during
03 - 04 February as the high-speed stream gradually subsides. Quiet
conditions are expected during 05 - 08 February. Activity is
expected to increase to unsettled to active levels during 09 - 10
February due to another recurrent coronal hole high-speed stream.
Quiet to unsettled conditions are expected during 11 - 13 February
as coronal hole effects subside. Activity is expected to decrease to
quiet levels during the rest of the period.


www.swpc.noaa.gov...

The main page is:
home.earthlink.net...

(edited to correct link)

[edit on 26-1-2008 by Siren]



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 02:09 PM
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dunno if anyone's linked this yet or not, but here's an
asteroid data services page by lowell observatory (if you can figure out how to use it)
asteroid.lowell.edu...

[edit on 26-1-2008 by undo]



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 02:10 PM
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What if the asteroid already killed us and we didn't even realize it. Could it have hit us so hard and fast that we didn't even notice?



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 02:12 PM
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Interesting and I had checked space weather just last night. Cool.


I don't think solar wind and this object passing at this time are directly related nor do I think any plasma discharge or EM disturbances of any note will be observed related to the object. It isn't THAT big. But it is sort of close. Sounds like a good night for the Northern/Southern Lights though... and maybe a HAARP-shot? Anybody in Alaska feel like their hair is standing on end? Just kidding.

I do think that "there is something" either going or not going on. There's been a certain "awkwardness" about this compared to earlier spun-like-mad-MSM asteroid stuff. Deep-Impact, Apophis bah, blah. Hmph. Would make a great release date for a movie about asteroids. LOL. Uh, oh... better copyright that. LOL.

Vic



posted on Jan, 26 2008 @ 02:39 PM
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Originally posted by thehumbleone
What if the asteroid already killed us and we didn't even realize it. Could it have hit us so hard and fast that we didn't even notice?


This is one for the books... ; )
I am not making fun of you.
It's actually one of my favourite quotes (from now on).





[edit on 26-1-2008 by Vanitas]



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