It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

ACLU argues in Craig case that airport restroom sex is private

page: 2
0
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 18 2008 @ 10:40 PM
link   
I have a problem with the idea of a bathroom sting to begin with. If there was really a problem at this location, why not post a sign asking people to call xxx-xxxx if they see inappropriate behavior. It was an airport. Everyone has a cell phone, and security would be seconds away.

So why do a 'sting?' Stings allow police to rack up arrests and fine revenue, unlike the posted-sign method. It is a kind of mass-production for cops. I have never, ever encountered gays having sex in a public restroom, so I question whether it's a major problem. Once at a highway reststop, a guy asked me if I wanted a BJ. I declined and went on my way. I'm straight, but I did not have an heart attack, didn't call 911, and didn't feel scarred for life.

I believe the 'sting' concept originated from confidence men. It allows police at times to rope in innocents who wouldn't break the law on their own. It usually targets those not suspected of crimes for investigation, which to my mind should be a Fourth Amendment violation.




posted on Jan, 19 2008 @ 12:34 AM
link   
I agree that it is a form of entrapment, a total setup. Sgt. Dave Karsnia seems like the perfect guy for the job, too. I mean, just look at his picture.



I bet Sgt. Karsnia pulls in wannabe stall mates left and right. I wonder what kind of eye contact and other types of subtle encouragement he uses to entice his targets. "Come on over here and tap your toe, big guy." It makes me feel like throwing up.

The whole sordid mess is gross and nasty and abominable. It really shows how far we as a society have sunk that we have undercover police officers in airport bathrooms posing as gay sex prospects, not to mention men cruising the stalls looking to get it on.



posted on Jan, 19 2008 @ 02:25 AM
link   
You're right Icarus. I think part of it is a nexus of sleaze between police & press. A few years ago this filthiness would not have been reported. It would have been swept under the rug, which sometimes is a good thing. If all of us had to have our most wretched moments opened up, it would not be pretty.

I had not seen that photo of the Sgt who arrested Craig, but I did hear the audio of his interview back when it happened, and he obviously was a weasel. He even looks like a weasel.

I don't like the press/PD nexus of sleaze. Why do PD's now hire ex-reporters as PR people? Why do we have shows like COPS that conflate law enforcement and entertainment?

Maybe the officer who recently posted the 'so you hate cops' thread can explain.



posted on Jan, 19 2008 @ 09:39 AM
link   
SemperFortis is a great guy, a respected member (at least by me), and a good resource for the law enforcement perspective. I'm not sure what experience he has with this kind of thing, but I would be interested to hear his thoughts, as well.

Semper, are you following this discussion? Want to weigh in?



posted on Jan, 19 2008 @ 01:38 PM
link   
Some of the things that the ACLU defends do leave me cold. Some of the creepy types that they defend, etc...

But...having said that, for the most part I feel they are a neccessary part of the judicial system...I just wish they'd be a bit more careful about which cases they take in order to defend which ever part of the Constitution they're defending. Sometimes I think they go more for shock value than actual usefulness.



posted on Jan, 19 2008 @ 05:38 PM
link   
Well said, and my point exactly. Its great they are defending the Constitution, but they don't have to be media whores, chasing publicity and sensationalism while they are at it, imo.



posted on Jan, 22 2008 @ 12:38 AM
link   
I don't understand why it is illegal for someone to ask another person to have sex. And why do Democrats think it is horrible that someone would ask another of the same sex to have sex?



posted on Jan, 22 2008 @ 09:04 AM
link   
I'm not sure that's the point. The legal aspect of his guilty plea, the cover-up, and the hypocrisy of Craig's professional stance in the Senate are really the issues that stand out to me. In his personal life, Mr. Craig can do as he wishes within the law. It is immatesticle to me.

Also, it is not illegal to solicit sex. It is illegal to solicit sex for money (prostitution). Mr. Craig pled guilty to disorderly conduct. I believe it was a deal he cut as he was facing other charges stemming from the incident, but only pled guilty to the one.



new topics

top topics



 
0
<< 1   >>

log in

join