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FDA Set to OK Cloned Meat and Milk

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posted on Jan, 16 2008 @ 10:04 PM
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just thought that everyone here should see this thread by palehorse. i think it links up well in this case and should be seen espicaly by shar.

www.abovetopsecret.com...




posted on Jan, 16 2008 @ 11:44 PM
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reply to post by krill
 



Thanks for the link. I just checked it out. I got this from that. They just truly don't care what "We The People want"



.....evidence surfaced suggesting that Americans and others are probably already eating meat from the offspring of clones.

Executives from the nation's major cattle cloning companies conceded yesterday that they have not been able to keep track of how many offspring of clones have entered the food supply, despite a years-old request by the FDA to keep them off the market pending completion of the agency's safety report. At least one Kansas cattle producer also disclosed yesterday that he has openly sold semen from prize-winning clones to many U.S. meat producers in the past few years, and that he is certain he is not alone......

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posted on Jan, 17 2008 @ 02:56 PM
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reply to post by Boondock78
 



Firstly I should say that I have not studied up on this topic and only know what has been fed to me via the press.

Would I eat it? - No I wouldn't if I knew it was cloned.
Why - We already have Artificial Insemination and Embryonic transfer to increase the quality of herds. Would cloning not eventually lead to a tiny gene pool? (AI is already doing this). Cloning will stop the spread of syphilis and other sexually transmitted diseases in cattle-- but AI already does this anyway.
I believe Mad Cow developed from feeding meat meal to cows (who are herbivores) to increase the protein levels, resulting in faster growing animals and a higher slaughter weight. So it won't reduce the risks associated with housing and diet problems in todays herds.

I think cloning is a very new technology and I am sure there is a place for it in our medical world, but jumping straight into introducing it to our food source concerns me. Dozens of other "miracle drugs" have been passed by health organisations, only to turn out to be health disasters.
Dolly the sheep was only born 12 years ago and they are still theorising what she "really" died of.

--
Julie

[edit on 2008/1/17 by poppyseed0054]



posted on Jan, 17 2008 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by MacSen191
 


How would it solve a lot of hunger needs for people? Cloned animals still need a surrigate mother to grow.



posted on Jan, 17 2008 @ 03:08 PM
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reply to post by poppyseed0054
 


who knows, but

Dolly did not die because of being a clone: an autopsy confirmed she had Ovine Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma (Jaagsiekte), a fairly common disease of sheep caused by the retrovirus JSRV. Roslin scientists stated that they did not think there was a connection with Dolly being a clone and that other sheep on the farm had similar ailments. Such lung diseases are a particular danger for sheep kept indoors and Dolly had to sleep indoors for security reasons


^^^^she died from a common disease in sheep. that disease is a danger for sheep kept indoors and dolly spent some time indoors....

could it have been cause she was cloned? yeah, sure...
little curious though she died from a common sheep disease though eh..

either way, i don't want to debate about dolly. that was years ago. not relavent to this imo



posted on Jan, 17 2008 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by Boondock78
 


You have a point. Plus she did live longer than most sheep in the field who have to be slaughtered due to poor mouths and feet. I won't dispute that sheep kept indoors develop lung problems -- the same problems occur in cattle.

The wiki aritcle says "some believe the reason for Dolly's death was that she was actually born with a genetic age of 6 years, the same age the sheep from which she was cloned. One basis for this was that Dolly's telomeres were short, typically a result of the aging process."

I'm not sure who "some" are, although it is interesting that Dolly was cloned from a 6 yo sheep. Did that ewe have crippling arthritis?

Did Dolly's surrogate mother suffer from arthritis? Are they sure the clone doesn't absorbs something of the surrogate mother.

(I think I am starting to stray from the original topic..hehe I better stop.)

[edit on 2008/1/17 by poppyseed0054]



posted on Jan, 17 2008 @ 03:39 PM
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reply to post by poppyseed0054
 


i am most interested in the fact that she died at 6 years old and the sheep she was cloned from was 6.
that might be something there.



posted on Jan, 17 2008 @ 04:02 PM
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Have you ever taken a leaf from a plant, stuck it in a glass of water till it grew roots, and then planted it? Guess what you got. You have a clone. And exact copy. And it does not matter how many copies of copies you get they will all be an exact copy of the original.

Man and nature or God if you prefer has been doing it for eons. There is no difference between a cloned grape plant and cow. Only in the method of getting the “roots” started.



posted on Jan, 18 2008 @ 11:50 AM
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I think it is time for the big VAT! Growing Prime Beef in vats! and udders o' milk, too. Mmmm mmm mmmm. My mouth is watering just imagining a thick porterhouse sliced off the mother-steak in my home vat.



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