It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Divining rod used to find missing marine

page: 1
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 10:10 PM
link   
(Please, remove this post if the subject has been or is being discussed elsewhere. I haven't noticed it - obviously.
)

The sheriff actually used a "divining rod" to search for - and apparently find - the missing marine Maria Lauterbach.

Larry King Transcript

and here:

Anderson Cooper 360











[edit on 12-1-2008 by Vanitas]

[edit on 12-1-2008 by Vanitas]




posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 03:28 PM
link   
Does anyone (especially in the US) have any fresh information on this?



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 03:30 PM
link   
I will be keeping an eye out for this as much as possible.

VERY interesting!!



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 03:34 PM
link   
reply to post by deadline527
 


I hope you do!
(Keep an eye on it.
)

Thanks!



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 03:56 PM
link   
So, the interviewee tells Larry King that the sheriff uses a divining rod to find bodies and King ends the interview on that note?

The same individual tells Anderson Cooper the same thing and he just goes right on like there's nothing unusual in that practice.

I can say this. Having watched a very agitated Geraldo Rivera interview the sheriff last night, I can truthfully report that the sheriff, while not possessing strong verbal skills, is a no-nonsense kind of guy and completely unflappable.

The divining rod was never mentioned, however.

[edit on 2008/1/13 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 04:03 PM
link   
Here's an article with a video.


Now Sheriff Ed Brown says a piece of home made equipment like this helped find the grave site. It's just a straightened-out coat hanger, but Sheriff Brown swears it helped this investigation.

www.wnct.com...



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 04:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by GradyPhilpott
So, the interviewee tells Larry King that the sheriff uses a divining rod to find bodies and King ends the interview on that note?

The same individual tells Anderson Cooper the same thing and he just goes right on like there's nothing unusual in that practice


I think CNN calls it balance...

(Just kidding, of course.)



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 04:14 PM
link   
reply to post by GradyPhilpott
 


Thank you very much, GradyPhilpott.

Wouldn't it be something if an ATS member went to interview the sheriff in question...? Now that would put ATS in the forefront!


Just a thought.



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 04:30 PM
link   
I call BS on this one. Dowsing is to find water not holes, I know I can do it. It was a gift handed down to me from my grandfather. I used it to find my sewer line that ran out of my house. If the Sheriff did use dowsing he was picking up the water in her body. I hope they fry the person responsible for killing that young woman and her baby.



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 04:52 PM
link   
If you've ever dug a hole and filled it back up, you know that the dirt, no matter how hard you try to tamp it down, just doesn't fit the same way and the ground is softer there than the adjacent undisturbed ground.

I wasn't there, but just walking on the ground should reveal where a shallow grave is.

Heck, a visual inspection should do the same thing.



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 06:07 PM
link   
reply to post by Sky watcher
 


Well, I have no dog in this race, as they say... But if the sheriff said he used dowsing - or a "divining rod" - I have no objective reason to disbelieve him.

Anyway, I think that "divining" tools - like Tarot cards, crystal balls, coffee grounds, etc. - serve as just that: tools for the intuition to grasp what's being looked for. So if the good sheriff devised a system of his own, and it works... good for him.

Apparently, it's not the first time he's used it (successfully, it seems).

I really think it'd be a good idea for some ATS member to interview him.



[edit on 13-1-2008 by Vanitas]



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 06:24 PM
link   
reply to post by Vanitas
 


Dowsing is real unlike crystal balls as you mentioned. You might give it a try. I think it could work for anyone with an open mind.



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 08:37 PM
link   
reply to post by Sky watcher
 


Oh, crystal balls are very much "real"!
So are water scrying, Tarot, tea leaves... you name it.
Why wouldn't they be?
After all, they are just... tools.
(And there are many, of course, who don't need tools at all.)



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 09:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by Vanitas
Well, I have no dog in this race, as they say... But if the sheriff said he used dowsing - or a "divining rod" - I have no objective reason to disbelieve him.

Anyway, I think that "divining" tools - like Tarot cards, crystal balls, coffee grounds, etc. - serve as just that: tools for the intuition to grasp what's being looked for. So if the good sheriff devised a system of his own, and it works... good for him.

Apparently, it's not the first time he's used it (successfully, it seems).

I really think it'd be a good idea for some ATS member to interview him.


Tools for the intuition to grasp? What the heck are you talking about?

The fact that a sheriff is using a divining rod throws up some serious red flags. Is this normal? (for this sheriff that is) I certainly wouldn't want this guy leading any investigation if this is how he goes about solving cases.

Divining rods are bunk. There should be no place for them in the field of criminal investigations. What a waste of time.



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 09:04 PM
link   

Originally posted by Sky watcher
Dowsing is real unlike crystal balls as you mentioned. You might give it a try. I think it could work for anyone with an open mind.


If its real, why wouldn't it work for any kind of mind?



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 09:57 PM
link   



If its real, why wouldn't it work for any kind of mind?


Very good question.

I don't know whether it positively wouldn't work for "any kind of mind" (it is my suspicion that it does), but let's assume, for the sake of the argument, that it really doesn't work for everyone.

It is not the tool (say, a crystal ball) what "finds" the data we are looking for - it's the MIND of the person using the tool.
(If somebody sees figures in tea leaves left in the cup, for example, it is not because the tea leaves had actually "drawn" those figures, of course - it's because that individual's mind, for some reason, finds it easy to discern shapes, figures, images in the patterns formed by the tea leaves and project onto them data that their MIND is feeding them.

Every individual's mind has its own modus operandi, based like everything else - on affinities.

Just like some people like to express themselves by painting, others prefer sculpting, or some people find a certain colour "soothing" while others find the same colour "depressing" (etc.), some people find it easier to project their mind or intuition - or whatever you may choose to call this particular cognitive capacity (i.e. gathering data that are usually not accessible to the senses or the rational mind) - onto water, for example; others find that it's images (such as Tarot cards) what triggers their intuition - and so on.

In other words, the "tool" in question - a crystal ball, coffee grounds, the flight of birds (like in ancient Rome), whatever - is just a means of expression for their intuition (or the "collective unconscious" or whatever you prefer to call it) - i.e. of their subconscious (or even supraconscious) insight into data inaccessible by the ordinary senses. And being just that, a means of expression, it can obviously vary from individual to individual.

(I know that many doubt that intuition even exists, or that there are levels on which all data are accessible to everyone - but that's not relevant to this particular reply.)

P.S. I find it very difficult to express myself right now - but then, it IS past 4 a.m.
I may redo this reply tomorrow - or, if it's too late to edit, I'll find some other means of expression regarding this issue. ; ))







[edit on 13-1-2008 by Vanitas]



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 10:04 PM
link   
I once knew a man who had to find a pipe on a busy city street. A pipe burst, his mains valve was shot and the street had been paved over recently, covering the utility valve. He called several plumbers and at an average of $4k, they could file the emergency permits, get the blueprints dig the street and find the valve, but it would take some time. The man was at a loss, as his basement was steadily filling. A 60+ yeer old gentleman happens across the scene and tells the man, I can do the job for $1000 bucks, right now. All he needed, he said, was a plug for his jack hammer, his shovel and pick, and a coat hanger.
in disbelief and desperation, the man agrees. The old man takes the wire hanger, bends it in an L, and starts pacing the street, holding it loosely in his hand.
He stops, bends down and marks and X in the street. There he starts hammering through the tarmac. Picks and digs he does until he is 5 feet down and asks for a wrench.
The pipe is replaced inside that burst and an hour later the man is happily paying off the old timer.
I knew about dowsing or divining rods, but never saw one up close and personal before. I asked him how he was able to pinpoint exactly where he needed to dig. He told me after 40 years of doing it, you get to know the vibrations and what they mean. He said he can tell where valves are, diameter changes, branches, flow direction, current etc.

As far as the original topic of the senseless death. Another tragedy.

All I can do is play Mercy Mercy Me by Marvin Gaye and hope the world wakes up real soon.



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 10:18 PM
link   
reply to post by mantic
 


An experience like that is worth a thousand "scientific studies"...



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 10:41 PM
link   

Originally posted by Vanitas
An experience like that is worth a thousand "scientific studies"...



Why is it worth any amount of scientific studies? This experience is nothing but anecdotal, which is the exact opposite of scientific.

I am sure if the old man never found the pipe we wouldn't even be talking about his experience. For some reason I don't think dowsers would want that stated publicly.

As for the whole feeling "vibrations" thing, I'd be curious to know exactly what that means. Seems kinda "fluffy".


It is not the tool (say, a crystal ball) what "finds" the data we are looking for - it's the MIND of the person using the tool.
(If somebody sees figures in tea leaves left in the cup, for example, it is not because the tea leaves had actually "drawn" those figures, of course - it's because that individual's mind, for some reason, finds it easy to discern shapes, figures, images in the patterns formed by the tea leaves and project onto them data that their MIND is feeding them.


So, in essence its purely subjective. It has nothing to do with the actual dowsing rods.

Getting back to the thread topic, isn't detective work suppose to be objective, rather than subjective? Doesn't the fact that this detective is using dowsing rods to find dead bodies worry you? Doesn't that seem strange? What kind of police work is this? That's why I was questioning his methods earlier; because he is using subjective tactics rather than scientific and objective ones, which is what police should be using. Isn't it?



posted on Jan, 14 2008 @ 08:31 PM
link   

Why is it worth any amount of scientific studies? This experience is nothing but anecdotal, which is the exact opposite of scientific.


It may be "anecdotal" - and by definition it is - to all those who weren't there. Whether anecdotal reports should be disregarded - especially a priori, as it is done in pseudo-scientific circles, is a different question altogether...
More importantly, though - because it refers specifically to the experience related by the poster (and hence to my reply) - the person who experienced this first-hand doesn't need any studies to "confirm" what he/she SAW...




So, in essence its purely subjective. It has nothing to do with the actual dowsing rods.


I never said that (which is why I omitted the mention of the rod among my examples). And I never said that because I do not know that. In fact, there seems to be a pretty solid body of evidence that dowsing - unlike the divination techniques I mentioned - works independently of the mind, being influenced by different (geomagnetic and other) factors in the environment.
I have never been particularly interested in this subject, so I cannot give you any examples - but I am sure many others can.

And by the way: EVERY evaluation of anything is "purely subjective"...








[edit on 14-1-2008 by Vanitas]



new topics

top topics



 
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join