It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Advice on my Survival Kit

page: 1
2

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 07:11 PM
link   
Small Kit: Pocket Filler

Pencils
Pencil Pull
Paper
Safety Glasses
Pocket Knife
Lighter
Wrist Watch

Big Kit: Construction

Torpedo Leveler
3 Tape Measures
- Small Portable One - 6'
- Beginner One with fractions marked - 25'
- Contractor Grade Stanley - 28'
Assortment of Pliers
Assortment of Wrenches
Hammer (16 Ounces)
Crowbar
Dikes
Staple Gun
Plastic Pipe Hand-Saw
Mag-Lite Large Flashlight
Mag-Lite Small Flashlight
Cordless Power Flashlight
Cordless Power Sander
Cordless Jigsaw
Cordless Impact Gun
Corded Impact Gun
Drill-bit Set
Screw-bit Set
13-in-1 Screwdriver (Phillips, Flathead, Robertson, Torx)
6-in-1 Screwdriver (Phillips, Flathead)
Small Chisel
2 Stanley Razor-knives
Basic Lock-pick Kit
First-Aid Kit

Is there anything I should drop--anything I should add? I don't have a lot of money. Most of these tools I bought because they're necessities at work.




posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 07:29 PM
link   
I'm not a survivalist (well, I do like living, so I guess I'd like to stay around as long as possible) but what are you preparing for? I'm confused about the power tools.. You could definitely build shelters etc with them, but what about when the batteries run out?





posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 07:45 PM
link   

Originally posted by mattguy404
I'm not a survivalist (well, I do like living, so I guess I'd like to stay around as long as possible) but what are you preparing for? I'm confused about the power tools.. You could definitely build shelters etc with them, but what about when the batteries run out?




I'm talking about a crisis that would detach humans from modern society, such as a nuclear engagement, marshal law, et cetera.

Yeah, I have a bad habit of hording my tools, even when they have no apparent use. I had to restrain myself from including the caulk gun and putty knife.
The power tools would be just-in-case I could find an alternative power source. They're seriously efficient at lowering construction time, even if I only have two batteries charged. The only reason I included the power sander and power flashlight was because they came in a case with the impact gun and jigsaw. Removing them would only save me like 2 pounds of baggage.



posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 07:52 PM
link   
Oh ok, I'm with you now. I live in an inland part of Australia, so I don't worry too much about nuclear war down this end (yet!). While I'm not into survival, I do keep a wind-up electric torch with a built-in radio nearby. There's been times when I've needed to use a torch when the power has gone out, only to find the batteries have rotted away. The wind-ups have a little dynamo that generates power, so they don't need batteries.

A wind-up impact gun, that's what we need



posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 08:21 PM
link   

Originally posted by mattguy404
Oh ok, I'm with you now. I live in an inland part of Australia, so I don't worry too much about nuclear war down this end (yet!). While I'm not into survival, I do keep a wind-up electric torch with a built-in radio nearby. There's been times when I've needed to use a torch when the power has gone out, only to find the batteries have rotted away. The wind-ups have a little dynamo that generates power, so they don't need batteries.

A wind-up impact gun, that's what we need


Lol. I know it was a joke, but: I'm surprised that they don't have a power-less impact gun: You pull the trigger, releasing the mechanical gears to spin or something like that. Granted it would probably have low RPM, but eh.

The crank torch sounds like a good idea. I was thinking about getting a crank radio earlier.

I also remember hearing about completely cordless nail-guns (no air compressor needed). Because, even with electricity, air compressors are too much of a pain to lug around. I was thinking about getting a nail-gun for work regardless, so I might check into those.



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 12:45 AM
link   
Well, this really made me think... it is certainly not the "normal approach" to survival in the "rambo" sense, in fact it is quite a refreshing angle. Everyone on here has their own idea of what sit-x could happen and the plans and opinions are varied just the same... but it takes different strokes to move the world, and in turn it takes different skills also. If everyone had to flee to the hills or decided to stay behind or tend to the injured... yada yada... they all have a place, and those skills will eventually be worth their weight in gold. (and the price is rising)

One thing that makes me wonder is how you plan on powering (recharging) these tools if the situation arises where you just can't plug into the wall anymore? Hypothetically thinking, what then? That is a big question... and the fact is all of us depend on that convenience day in and day out, and most of us take it for granted. Have you thought of solar, wind or other alternative energies? I'm not sure if it is feasible even, but to do anything requires some form of energy, whether simple or elaborate. I can't imagine how many calories I have burned from cutting 2x4's with a handsaw, and I would hate to think of how much it takes to drill a hole by hand with an auger. Eeegads!




My advice would be this:
Look up some self-reliance ideas, try to be self-sustaining with your endeavors and never hope that the "grid" will be there in hard times... actually try to get away from the grid and lend your skills and knowledge to those who seek the same in life.

If you want to augment your kit, toss a good thorough survival guide in your bag of gear... knowledge is power, and the tools to make it happen are a godsend.


Some other ideas to throw at ya:
Maybe look into a petrol generator of some sort, although it may be harder to come across fuel in crisis times it could give you an edge. Something with a lower wattage output would probably work depending on the draws you have attatched. Most of them are rated in wattage, and most electrical devices are rated in amperage. An easy way to know the wattage of your loads is this:

1. W = A x V
2. V = W x A
3. A = W / V
In laymans terms,
Amperage multiplied by Voltage will equal your relative Wattage draw.
Watts multiplied by Amperage will equal relative Voltage.
Wattage divided by Voltage will equal relative Amperage.

A good rule of thumb is to allow extra overhead for electric motors (peak draw) on startup, however I can't remember the ratio at the moment. But resistance (continutity) will also be a factor. The longer the cable run, the less continuity and more resistance.


Hope this could be of use...


cheers,
The Telemetry



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 01:12 AM
link   
Hi proletariat!

First, this is a very strange survival kit. These tools will not help you very much to survive IMHO. What are you planning to build? Most of these tools would be too heavy to carry with you if you need to leave your area ASAP.

I suggest you keep the first aid kit, and rethink almost everything else.

For instance, a Gerber hatchet can be used not only as a hatchet, but as a hammer, a crowbar, and it has a very good saw in the handle. This weighs 2 pounds and is small, no need to carry 4 different large items when you can have one small item.

I suggest the bare minimum for a survival kit is

#1 First aid kit. Doesn't need to be fancy if you have no special needs. Should include water purification tablets or filter.

#2 Multi-tool. Thank GOD for the multi-tool. A fixed blade knife is also a must.

#3 Rifle. Its your right to own a firearm. Enfield SMLE, Mauser, Mosin-Nagant, K31, M1, SKS... If you cant defend yourself during a life threatening situation good luck surviving. Seriously though, don't depend on luck.

#4 A pack that holds EVERYTHING you need to survive. If all your stuff is sitting on your garage floor, its pretty much useless. Mobility is THE key. Travel light and smart.

#5 Clothing. Wool, wool, wool at least 24 oz..... Cotton kills. Believe me, if you are uncomfortable all the time, you will not be focusing on the task at hand and that is deadly. The "miracle" fibers cant hold a candle to wool.

Check out THIS thread for some pics of members survival kits. Best of luck to you.


[edit on 13-1-2008 by METACOMET]



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 01:53 AM
link   
I find this to be an interesting read:

Nuclear war survival skills

Be warned, it's a relatively large PDF. It's a bit old, but there's lots of interesting stuff there about vitamins, lighting, shelters and the like. Even a fallout meter made out of a tin can...



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 11:25 AM
link   
Alot of the talk on this forum is about running to the hills with a basic kit, living off the land and catch game for food. This might be ok for some who live in 'good' places to hide/survive without modern day comforts, living in the hills would soon become a pain in the ... and then winter would come and make it even worse.

Looking at the kit posted by Proletariat it is easy to say its useless to have 3 tape measures, corded and cordless tool, but i think its people with skills and the tools left over who will be the real winners.

Their can be no doubt the tools listed wold be (for the most part) useless if you were trying to live on the side of a hill far away from your previous home, so you need a plan for what happens should you have no choice but to forget the tools and move from your home.



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 11:42 AM
link   
The way I see it, when sit-X does hit the fan and you are focusing on survival, you have to think in the long term. While many items may seem like a great idea, is it necessesary to carry the extra weight for something that is going to be unusable within a week? Food, and water are a different subject, but many items can be fashioned out of wood. Improvising will be key in a survival situation - to be able to use a rock as a hammer, or use some vine instead of rope, and so on. This will save you a invaluable amount of space for items that you may not be able to come across in the wild.

Try to find items that will serve dual purposes, or items that do not depend on battery. Some valuble tools in my opinion that you definitley should have would be as follows :

Magnafying Glass - Invauble in the sense that you will not need matches, lighters, flint, etc.. to start a fire with this. Being able to have a reusable source of ignition to me is one of the most important peices. If you cant start a fire, your in a bad bad spot.

Hand Crank Radio - This one I would have never of thought about bringing along until I saw other people post it. You are going to need to know what is happening, where its happening, and to keep yourself in touch with reality. Batterys will be no good, so one that you can hand crank for electricity is definitley on the list.

And now lastly, this one is what I am personally saving up for and I think it will be the difference between survival and imprisonment.

Foot Launched Powered Paraglider - When the SHTF you are going to need to get out, and get out quick. Roads will be way too conjested and most likely you wont be able to escape if you live in a densely populated area. These little babies run for about 5000$ USD but have an amazing range, very easy to use, and can take off from anywhere. You could literally strap it on and take off at your closest park - or anywhere for that matter where you have about 50 yards of space. Me and a friend of mine are both getting one, as well as our survival kits - so we can head to the hills the second something goes down without worrying about not being able to make it.

Hope these ideas helped you, and good luck with your kit!



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 12:02 PM
link   
While it is clear that this is not a survival kit for a world gone mad, it is indeed a useful endeavor and a fresh approach. Having the skills needed to build, and create, is quite desirable. Many in these types of threads simply plan on going Rambo and have no clue about the realities of that type of situation. Some think that because they have a gun and have been hunting, that they will be just fine. It is a whole different game when you can't stock up on beer and beef jerky, and don't have a warm cabin with football on the TV to come back to.

As you have a different approach, there is one immediate suggestion that I have for you. Some have spoken about the need to power your equipment in the event of Grid failure. Generators are nice, but they are expensive, heavy to lug around, and noisy. You don't need to go to all that trouble. All you need is a vehicle, and a simple general purpose power inverter, which you can pick up cheaply at any Auto Parts store. Simply plug it into the cigarette lighter and charge up your tools. I have a coworker who keeps his batteries charged simply by plugging into his inverter as he drives to the job site. A power inverter will take the 12 volt DC from your vehicles alternator and convert it into 110 Ac current. You can plug all sorts of items into them depending on it's power rating. No need to get anything fancy for charging your tools.

Good luck, and keep adding to your kit as time goes on.



posted on Jan, 13 2008 @ 09:03 PM
link   


Generators are nice, but they are expensive, heavy to lug around, and noisy. You don't need to go to all that trouble. All you need is a vehicle, and a simple general purpose power inverter, which you can pick up cheaply at any Auto Parts store. Simply plug it into the cigarette lighter and charge up your tools. Snip


Good point on the generators... I would second that idea on a power inverter now. I work in a big box Auto parts store myself and that thought never crossed my mind. Gotta think outside the box sometimes.... doh!

I wouldn't run an inverter too long on your primary vehicle battery though, you will end up running it down pretty quick if your not running the engine. I actually had a secondary alternator setup in my old toyota that was setup for welding broken stuff on the trail.



regards,
The Telemetry



posted on Jan, 14 2008 @ 02:22 PM
link   
what about rope? You can never have too much rope. It is a pretty obvious addition to your kit but it is also overlooked a lot too



posted on Jan, 14 2008 @ 02:29 PM
link   
dont know how good those will do u in a situation X, unless u plan on chewing on your cordless tools or using one of them as a weapon. cordless tools would have never crossed my mind in regards to survival, food/shelter/gun would be my cup of tea.


[edit on 14-1-2008 by plug_pray]



posted on Jan, 14 2008 @ 05:14 PM
link   
Everyone seems to think SURVIVAL, means going Rambo and loading up on guns. That is a bit extreme. What about Katrina, a tsunami, earthquake, or similar short term disaster. Rambo is a fairy tale and many of the posters who go that route are more likely to get shot.

This list, is obviously aimed in a different direction and should be considered. If a natural disaster hit your town, this guy would probably do far better, than a guy with tons of guns and beef jerky. I am all for alternative lines of thought, and quality tools are ALWAYS a good investment.

I'd add a good hand saw or even better, a japanese style pull saw to your list. They work extremely well, and can cut a great deal with little effort. They also do not cost much. Rope is a good idea as well. Perhaps some parachute cord as it is light weight but very strong. Forget the cordless nail gun, just get some nails and a hammer. Plastic sheeting or one of those blue construction tarps. You could build quite a shelter with one and it will keep your gear and yourself dry. I keep a smaller one in my trunk.



posted on Jan, 15 2008 @ 05:52 PM
link   
thinking about the power tools and I like the idea. A rechargeable reciprocating saw could come in handy. I think that if you had a solar recharger and some extra batteries that you could be set.

I recently purchased a 4.5kw generator. Due to an ice storm where there was a power outage.

I understand (like others) that survival kits will vary depending on what you are trying to survive and where you live.

Understand that you can survive a lot w/ very little. A little traing and pratical application will go a long way. I was fortunate enough to be trained by the military attending several different survival related schools for several different environments. I could like w/ 90% of whats in ur kit but man would some of it make life nice.

In addition to all of your gear you have there why not put together a daypack w/ just essentials. Just incase you are in a hurry and need to escape something maybe like a fire. You atleast get out w/ some of your gear. I cant say it enough...Add rope to your kit. 550 cord atleast. It is easy to carry and store and has a whole lot of uses. How about a compass too.



posted on Jan, 15 2008 @ 08:23 PM
link   
reply to post by Proletariat
 


As I said before, I don't have just one "kit" as i believe in redundency as well as drawing a distinction between survival mode and creating a new self sufficient lifestyle.
Where this may apply to your questions is my major gear.
Given enough time to return home and load my truck for an evac, I have several footlockers full of stuff to recreate a home away for home.
Amoung the contents of these foot lockers is my collection of "antique" carpenters tools. Things like a bow saw, draw knife, several sizes of hand planes and a variety of handsaws and awl's as well as a hand auger with boring bits as well as drill bits.
I got started collecting these tools when my uncle died and left me his tools, but as I continued to add to his collection by frequenting yard sales, and flea markets, I began to see the wisdom of applying them to my gear for sit-x.
Now as some have mentioned carrying alot of gear can be quite a burden, but in the eventuality I reach an impass where my truck can no longer go, once again I think " low tech" and would use a travois.
One man with an improvised harness and a travois can carry quite a load over a considerable distance if needed.
I tend to try to think ahead for eventualities, then draw on the tried and true survival methods used in the past.
I kinda figure if it worked for the pioneers that settled this continent, and worked for thousands of years for the native american, it might also work for me.
I would suggest familiarizing yourself with historic surivors, might help in the future.
Best of luck.


[edit on 15-1-2008 by 1ShotDeal]



posted on Jan, 18 2008 @ 02:31 PM
link   
The tool idea is a good one, especially if you're skilled in their use. When things begin to return to normal your talents will be invaluable and much sought after, but you have to survive until that time.

In that vein of thinking, I'd suggest that you start caching some food, water, medical supplies, a couple of good knives, a .22 rifle and/or pistol. These are the bare minimum you'll need when the grid goes down and all the shopping malls are closed in the good ol' US of A.



new topics

top topics



 
2

log in

join