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Example of distortion in journalism

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posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 09:09 AM
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I often see this sort of thing in articles, misleading overdramatic headlines that fall just short of being total lies (a thing I see often here in our topic headlines too, alas), or a distortion of facts, like in this case, facts taken out of context to create a different impression of said facts.

For example, from this article:

www.cnn.com...


President Musharraf told the Singapore Straits Times that his military has the experience to operate in the mountainous terrain near the Afghan border and if the United States went in they would "regret that day."


Wow, sounds like he was threatening us, doesn't it? At least, until you read further into the article, and find out that he said:


In the latest interview, Musharraf noted that U.S. forces were having trouble chasing al Qaeda in similar terrain in southern Afghanistan.

"The United States seems to think that what our army cannot do, they can do," he said. "This is a very wrong perception. I challenge anybody to come into our mountains. They would regret that day. It's not easy there."


That's NOT the same thing at all. And of course, now having read the full quote, I don't see the threat in the initial prose, but it was intentional, putting something like that in the beginning of the article, to grab your attention.

It's all subtle of course. Even the title, while not misleading, was chosen to grab your attention and drum up the drama. He never said, "Stay out of Pakistan". The writer implies that. Why not use, "Musharraf Invites US to Search for Bin Laden Together". It's equally implied.

Once you start recognizing the way media twist words about, you see it more and more. Challenge yourself to find them. It's both amusing and disheartening.


[edit on 12-1-2008 by Jadette]




posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 09:21 AM
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Yes...it happens all the time. But FYI: It happens even more often at ATS in order to hype ones threads.



posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 09:45 AM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating
Yes...it happens all the time. But FYI: It happens even more often at ATS in order to hype ones threads.


Actually, one of the first things I did was point that out



I often see this sort of thing in articles, misleading overdramatic headlines that fall just short of being total lies (a thing I see often here in our topic headlines too, alas),


Feel free to post other articles here that you see doing the same thing.

[edit on 12-1-2008 by Jadette]



posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 09:49 AM
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Originally posted by Jadette

Actually, one of the first things I did was point that out





ooops...sorry. either I missed that or you edited it into your post after the fact.



anyway...it happens so often at ATS and in mass media that I´d have to sit here all day copy-pasting stuff into this thread.



posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 10:02 AM
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My post was edited before you even replied. It was a typo.

I'm exactly sure why you want to insult me. Is it necessary or topical? Gee.



posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 10:35 AM
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No, I didnt want to insult, I was just kidding.

Now back on topic: Yes, the media loves to hype and distort. Often its more about selling newspapers and shows rather than reporting.



posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 05:22 PM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating
Now back on topic: Yes, the media loves to hype and distort. Often its more about selling newspapers and shows rather than reporting.


I agree completely. It's become 'entertainment' and a business, therefore more concerned with 'sales' than any responsible journalism.

I hear cries of 'bias' all the time, but rarely do I see real bias. And face it, most of the time this 'bias' is simply the fact that the article in question makes a point that some reader or other disagrees with. I think the greater crime is distortion and taking things out of context to create a bigger, bolder drama out of whatever has happened.



posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 05:29 PM
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Being a journalism student myself, I can say that it is true that it just really is about the advertising dollar. The paper where I did a short internship in my first year had wide open windows and brand new computers for their advertising section, while the actual journalists had the dark, dank end of the office with really old computers (think NT 4!).

The distortion is usually due to sloppy journalism. They might read a press release and nothing else or grab it off Reuters without giving a rats about all the aspects of the story.



posted on Jan, 16 2017 @ 01:22 AM
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January 16, 2017

FAKE "news" and SENSATIONALISM "news" are ruining Journalism. Local TV news is now prioritizing news stories based on if there is a cool or exciting video associated with it.

For instance, a security camera filmed 3 men stealing a car and running through the garage door. That EXCITING VISUAL put that story ahead of the next story... a mom/daughter killed by a hit and run driver that the Chicago police were desperately searching for that night. The hit-and-run had no video, so, of course it wasn't as "newsworthy" as the video of a car theft in action.

However, since the public isn't complaining about these upside-down priorities, my guess is that most people are OK with this. It's the same mentality that filled Donald Trump rallies. Showmanship and hype sells. Hillary Clinton was just the opposite..and lost.



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