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Masons, your advice is needed

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posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 10:15 AM
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I have many friends across the United Kingdom, political, business, finanical et al. Some are masons. To cut a long story short, I was asked by a few of them to visit my local masonic lodge because they believe I'd make a good mason (type of person they are looking for).

I've been told to just have a chat and point out I've been recommended by fellow masons, but one is quite nervous (and deeply honoured at the same time).

Well, I'd just like some advice (please, do not call me a satanist, illuminati members...)

[edit on 11-1-2008 by infinite]




posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 10:22 AM
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But your name suggests you are illuminati... EU president..

anyways go ahead... i will suggest you join...



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 10:22 AM
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Originally posted by infinite
I have many friends across the United Kingdom, political, business, finanical et al. Some are masons. To cut a long story short, I was asked by a few of them to visit my local masonic lodge because they believe I'd make a good mason (type of person they are looking for).

I've been told to just have a chat and point out I've been recommended by fellow masons, but one is quite nervous (and deeply honoured at the same time).

Well, I'd just like some advice (please, do not call me a satanist, illuminati members...)


It is my understanding that no one can make you become a Mason. Hence the whole 2B1ASK1 thing.

If your friends have recommended that you drop by and see what goes on, they believe that you possess the necessary moral character to become something that not everyone can become: more than you are right now. In the United States, Freemasonry claims to 'make good men better.' I'm sure it's very similar over in the U.K.

Good luck in whatever you decide. Your friends paid you a high compliment!

Your pal,
Meat.



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 10:28 AM
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What kind of advice are you looking for?

If it is something that interests your, then go. What harm could getting a bit more knowledge under your belt do? You can either sit around and listen to opinions, or go see for yourself. You are an intelligent person. You search for the truth, and dont allow people to think for you, obviously because you are an ATS member. So, why not go?



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 10:28 AM
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But I am currently at University, will that be a problem?

Commitment will be a tough thing when dealing with exams.



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 10:36 AM
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Why dont you join and become an "undercover ATS agent" ?

You can then report to all at ATS about what really goes on in masonry.



[edit on 11-1-2008 by N.B.A.Y.S.O.H]



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 11:00 AM
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Originally posted by N.B.A.Y.S.O.H
Why dont you join and become an "undercover ATS agent" ?

You can then report to all at ATS about what really goes on in masonry.


Ermm...no.

It's quite an honour to be asked.



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 11:02 AM
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Originally posted by mmmeat


It is my understanding that no one can make you become a Mason. Hence the whole 2B1ASK1 thing.


The 2B1Ask1 stuff is only relevant in the USA. In many other countries, Masonic membership is by invitation only, and the OP is apparently European.

To the OP: It's of course completely up to you, but if you want to visit, take a look around, talk with some of the bros, no harm done and you can decide later.



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 11:10 AM
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Originally posted by mrsdudara
What kind of advice are you looking for?


Well, I suppose it's just nerves more than anything. But it would be nice to here fellow members experiencing of the first time they visited a masonic lodge.



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 11:11 AM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light
The 2B1Ask1 stuff is only relevant in the USA. In many other countries, Masonic membership is by invitation only, and the OP is apparently European.


Really?

Good to know! Thank you, thank you, thank you for posting something that isn't based on conjecture about the Fraternity.

Your pal,
Meat.



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 11:15 AM
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Ermm...no.

It's quite an honour to be asked.


All depends where your head lies i guess.

Whats so honorable about being a mason? there raceist,sexist,they wont accpect you if your poor, the list goes on.

Go ahead and join maybe you will get to become a 33rd, after 20 years of ever increasing subscription fees, and countless pointless rituals.



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 11:37 AM
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reply to post by N.B.A.Y.S.O.H
 


You are quite simply factually wrong. Do you have any sort of evidence to back up any of those assertions? No, you won't. Because it is not true.

Although no one is asked in the US, the OP _probably_ (I don't know, I can't speak for him) feels this is an honor because it says that the men of his community have found him to be of good moral character and a good citizen. These are requirements for membership. Most people are humble, so for most this would be a compliment. If someone was not humble and thought they were the best thing ever, I assume it would indeed not be an honor.

I joined masonry as a graduate student, and I assure you I was and am poor, and because of my field I will never be rich. I go to lodge with millionaires and farmers, business owners and lower middle class retirees. Income has absolutely nothing to do with it.

As far as being sexist - yet again, factually wrong. It is a fraternity, that means MEN. There are other types of masonry that do admit men and women, and even in the "men only" variety there is the Order of the Eastern Star for women. If this is sexist, then so are the boy scouts - since they admit males only!

Finally, there is absolutely no relation between the blue lodge and the Scottish Rite, which conveys the 33rd degree. A master mason in a regular lodge is the same rank as any 33rd degree mason. Oh, by the way, I'm a 32nd degree mason - you know what it cost me per YEAR? $110. And both my blue lodge and Scottish Rite chapter would "help" with the dues if I could not afford it. Yeah, only for the rich...

[edit on 11-1-2008 by LightinDarkness]



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 11:49 AM
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You must do what feels right to you.
My 'great' uncle and 'great grandfather' are/was 33 masons.

Cant say there is anything sinister about them.


Suppose you can go check it out and see what you think.
It may be something you enjoy, if not then time will tell and you can drop out.


Peace

dAlen



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 07:02 PM
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reply to post by infinite
 


Iifinite, I have seen your post on Above Top Secret and you always seem to me to be very conscientious and thoughtful. I think you would enjoy becoming a Mason, but even if you chose not to you would at least have the opportunity to have an interesting conversation with several of the Brothers. Go with an open mind and just try to enjoy the conversation, I am certain you will report back with nothing but positive comments.



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 07:21 PM
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reply to post by infinite
 
if you dont want to asso. with santanist or illuminati ect then you best not join , im a former lt Colnel in the army adn im telling that is exactally what it is !!!!!! aprox 85%+ CIA members and top pol. and mill officials are and I know why , PLZ dont go there PLZ !!!! its pure evil I at one time was part of it and was in Black ops ITS PURE EVIL IN ALL ITS GLORY!!!!!



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by greg _rinchich
 


Just an observation. As a self stated former Lt. Colonel you have an odd way of spelling Colonel.



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 07:52 PM
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reply to post by infinite
 


Infinite

I have been an English freemason for 15 years, and would be very happy to answer any questions you might have. The internet, and indeed ATS, is unfortunately full of misinformation - some of it quite unintentional. For example in the UK, as in the US, one has to ask rather than be asked. There will be a great deal of taking the horse to water going on (witness your invitation) but you still have to choose to drink.

Feel free to u2u me if you prefer, and I would be happy to speak with you directly if your typing speed is anything like mine


BTW I was really nervous about it all before I joined, but I knew people in the lodge, asked lots of questions and never had any doubt I would enjoy it. It was a good decision.



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 08:13 PM
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Originally posted by greg _rinchich
if you dont want to asso. with santanist or illuminati ect then you best not join

greg _rinchich, in his questionable-spelling kind of way, is absolutely, 100% correct ... sort of. The ONLY times you'll ever be associated with 'santanist' or 'illuminati' or 'ect' will be on this site or on an anti-Masonic site.


Originally posted by greg _rinchich
, im a former lt Colnel in the army adn im telling that is exactally what it is !!!!!! aprox 85%+ CIA members and top pol. and mill officials are and I know why , PLZ dont go there PLZ !!!! its pure evil I at one time was part of it and was in Black ops ITS PURE EVIL IN ALL ITS GLORY!!!!!

I strongly disagree with your ... um ... "statement."

First off, if you were a Lt. Col. in the U.S. Army you'd know that only civilians call the Army covert operations section "Black ops."

You'd also know that there is a requirement relating to things like saying you were in "Black ops."

Furthermore, the CIA, 'top pol. and mill officials' are not Freemasons. Some may be, but - as with the general population - most are not.

Finally, if you were "part of it" then I'm sure that some of the Masons here would like to know the name of your mother Lodge.

Your pal,
Meat.



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 08:16 PM
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Originally posted by Trinityman
For example in the UK, as in the US, one has to ask rather than be asked.

Now wait a minute. I read on another thread (I was corrected, actually) that in the U.K. to become a Mason you have to be invited, and that the 2B1ASK1 thing was strictly U.S. based.

I'm not disagreeing with you ... I'm just seeking, err, "further light." (I couldn't figure out how to say "clarification" in a Masonic way).

Your pal,
Meat.



posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 04:02 AM
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This from the United Grand Lodge of England;



After reading the various booklets on this site, see 'All About Masonry' in the menu bar, and if you are still interested in becoming a Freemason, we advise that you first talk to a family member, friend or colleague whom you already know to be a member. They will be able to explain to you what they can about the fraternity and help you find a suitable Lodge.

If you don't know anyone at all who is a member, then get in touch with a Masonic Office in your area, see 'Index to Provinces' or 'Index to Overseas'. Write to that office, telling them a little bit about yourself and your reasons for wishing to join.


My lodge in Canterbury even has a museum and library.




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