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AT&T and Other ISPs May Be Getting Ready to Filter

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apc

posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 08:11 AM
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Well like I said it wouldn't require sniffing every single packet. If they want network layer filtering then all they'd have to do is add a few lines of firewall rules to route traffic destined to known P2P ports to a separate machine for further analysis. AT&T has the advantage of distributing the load to each individual central office so no one NOC is filtering all the DSL users. They can't technically identify anyone suspected of transferring copyrighted materials to the cops without a court order, but they can throttle the bandwidth down or send all the user's http traffic to some Shame On You page.

No question about the ethics. Before the bubble burst and my ISP failed (we weren't big... 14,000 dialup customers, isdn, city-wide wifi, long distance, hosting and colo) we wouldn't even filter outbound smtp when spam first started becoming a problem. Now tons of ISPs deny all outbound to port 25. Even that crosses the line in my opinion.

If I understand the legality correctly the only reason companies like AT&T are able to do this is because they provide connectivity over POTS, so the Cable TV Privacy Act doesn't apply. I'm switching to cablemodem today.




posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 08:22 AM
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reply to post by apc
 


The cable TV industry still fiber provided by the big telecoms at least in the Saint Louis area they do, they don't own a lot of the fiber that they use they lease it..

If this is true in other areas then you will still be sending traffic across the At&T backbone..

The bottom line people is that the government is and has been listening and probing your data for years at least since the CALEA law passed, 1996 or so..
as a ham radio operator I am here to tell you that I have equipment that will listen to just about anything I want to listen to and have software that will encode and decode just about anything out there yep Cell phones to so if someone wants to listen they are going to listen there is no stopping this..


Respectfully
GEO


apc

posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 08:35 AM
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Not necessarily. As I stated in my earlier post, many providers use other backbone providers. RR.COM for instance uses level3.

5 23 ms 23 ms 23 ms ex1-p14-0.eqdltx.sbcglobal.net [151.164.41.154]
6 24 ms 23 ms 23 ms asn336-level3.eqdltx.sbcglobal.net [151.164.248.202]
7 25 ms 24 ms 24 ms ge-1-3-0-79.bbr1.Dallas1.Level3.net [4.68.19.65]
8 48 ms 49 ms 49 ms ae-0-0.bbr2.Washington1.Level3.net [4.68.128.210]
9 48 ms 49 ms 48 ms ae-2-79.edge5.Washington1.Level3.net [4.68.17.73]
10 48 ms 47 ms 48 ms ROADRUNNER.edge5.Washington1.Level3.net [4.79.24.34]

Qwest provides end-user DSL service in many states as well, and none of their links are over AT&T.



posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 08:37 AM
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Level three just so you know is a very large government contractor in other words if this is what the Gov wants they will get it from level 3

advice.cio.com...

The link above gives you an idea of who owns what and all of these are government subsidized companies...so if they don't do what the government wants they lose grant money and subsidies that probably won't happen
they put these in grants as terms that have to be met in order to continue funding..

here are some other maps of backbones..
www.nthelp.com...



Respectfully
GEO

[edit on 1/11/2008 by geocom]

[edit on 1/11/2008 by geocom]

[edit on 1/11/2008 by geocom]


apc

posted on Jan, 11 2008 @ 09:00 AM
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We're not talking about government (yet). This is businesses acting within their rights as operating entities.

Also for the record that traceroute above was from an AT&T node. This one below is from an RR node:

4 6 ms 5 ms 6 ms srp9-0.kscymordc-rtr1.kc.rr.com [24.31.239.122]
5 18 ms 18 ms 18 ms so5-1-1-CHCGILL3-RTR1.kc.rr.com [24.94.160.81]
6 19 ms 19 ms 19 ms xe-9-1-0.edge1.Chicago2.Level3.net [4.71.248.1]
7 18 ms 21 ms 20 ms ae-2-54.bbr2.Chicago1.Level3.net [4.68.101.97]
8 37 ms 36 ms 37 ms ae-0-0.bbr1.Washington1.Level3.net [64.159.0.229]

I'm not too worried about what the government does. If I'm doing something that would put me in legal jeopardy, it won't be traceable to me anyway. This is business voluntarily breaking ethical code, so I'm switching to roadrunner with confidence from the Cable TV Privacy Act.



posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 10:58 AM
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reply to post by biggie smalls
 


An update to AT&T's internet filtering plan:

biz.yahoo.com...


Its no coincidence that they're mentioning this at the WEF...


DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) -- AT&T Inc. is still evaluating whether to examine traffic on its Internet lines to stop illegal sharing of copyright material, its chief executive said Wednesday.
CEO Randall Stephenson told a conference at the World Economic Forum that the company is looking at monitoring peer-to-peer file-sharing networks, one of the largest drivers of online traffic but also a common way to illegally exchange copyright files.



AT&T has talked about such plans since last summer. They represent a break with the current practice of U.S. Internet service providers, who are shielded by law from liability if their subscribers trade copyright files like movies.


Let's hope their plans are thwarted by the FCC, although very doubtful.


apc

posted on Jan, 23 2008 @ 12:42 PM
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When I called to cancel my AT&T services (both DSL and landline) the service rep stopped trying to recover my business as soon as I mentioned CES. I didn't ask, but I wager that I am not the only cancellation she had taken for that reason.

Hopefully AT&T will lose enough business over this to cause them to reevaluate this action. But for me, their even considering it is enough to take my money elsewhere.



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