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2 part mason influence in gov't

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posted on Jan, 9 2008 @ 06:03 PM
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Another key player in the construction of the United States of America was George Washington. His involvement as a Mason made him a stronger leader because it “provided him with more than confidence, because the lodge ritual’s function was to elevate the participant’s consciousness” (George Washington’s Masonic Connection). Being a Mason allowed Washington to have a greater control over his army, and that made him a more effective leader. Washington also had a direct influence on the plans for Washington D.C. George put some personal touches on the town that he thought would make D.C look better (Freemasonry 180). Most of the credit has been given to a select few who have helped create the USA. The men involved in the creation included Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, John Hancock, James Madison, Paul Revere, and a few more. These men have been given credit and blame for their parts in the American Revolution (The Freemasons 109).
Included in the Mason philosophy is the belief or disbelief of a certain religion. Many anti-mason members believe Masons are “secret Luciferian worship[ers]” who have the worst intentions for everybody, such as taking over the world. Freemasonry requires its members to have a belief in God, but does not support a “sectarian faith or practice.” Masonic ceremonies and rituals include prayer to help them seek “divine guidance” (Freemasonry 213). Many lodges would not even think about discussing religion inside of their meetings, but as the clubs evolved, most of the men agreed that God does in fact exist, is central in their lives, and helps them to serve humanity. The masons have been attacked on their view of religion since the beginning of their formation in 1717. The first attacker was the Roman Catholic Church, which issued a “series of encyclicals against the fraternity accusing it, among many other things, of deposing the Pope from his civil princedom and supporting the liberty of youths to follow whatever religion they prefer when they come of age” (Freemasonry 201-202). Even though the Masons deny being a religion, by definition, “an organization which insists that its members believe in God – though they call him the Great Architect of the Universe…is clearly an organization of deists (The Freemasons, 264).” Benjamin Franklin, coming closer than any other leader, believed in “freedom of worship and religious toleration, which in his case came closer to deism than it did in any of the leading brothers in English Grand Lodge” (The Freemasons 93). Much evidence supports the fact that Freemasonry is a religion, deism at the least, but even to this day the topic is still being disputed. The Masonic practice includes many symbols as a “private language” for masons.
For example, much of the Masonic symbols represent something abstract or metaphorical that pertains to something that is totally real (Freemasonry 217). “The chisel demonstrates some of the advantages of discipline and education. The mallet teaches to correct irregularities, and reduce man to a proper level. One of the most important symbols to the masons is the compass, being a universal symbol to all masons. The compass teaches all masons to square their actions by “the square of virtue” (Freemasonry 219). The freemasons used symbols and signs to show other masons they were in fact masons. For instance, if a mason was in a court hearing, the defendant would flash the judge a sign, and if the judge were a mason he would rule in favor of the defendant because his Masonic duty overruled his duty as a judge. The masons had such an influence in these types of situations that they could get away with murder, if it meant protecting the mason from punishment. Another form of recognition towards the freemasons are the monuments made by the masons all over the United States.




posted on Jan, 9 2008 @ 06:56 PM
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Originally posted by sworn2secrecy
Included in the Mason philosophy is the belief or disbelief of a certain religion.

I find this confusing. Which is it? belief or disbelief?


Even though the Masons deny being a religion, by definition, “an organization which insists that its members believe in God – though they call him the Great Architect of the Universe…is clearly an organization of deists

I do not believe that to be true. Believing in God isn't necessarily a hallmark of deists. But - it's my understanding that Freemasonry requires that members not be atheists - which is significantly different than being a deist, and is certainly different than being a religion.


One of the most important symbols to the masons is the compass, being a universal symbol to all masons. The compass teaches all masons to square their actions by 'the square of virtue'

Not to belabor the obvious, but a compass isn't used to square anything. It makes circles. It circumscribes. What you're writing - or parroting, or whatever - is ether incorrect or you've misunderstood what what written.

Probably what you meant was the 'square and compass' - which, together, are indeed a Masonic symbol.


The freemasons used symbols and signs to show other masons they were in fact masons. For instance, if a mason was in a court hearing, the defendant would flash the judge a sign, and if the judge were a mason he would rule in favor of the defendant because his Masonic duty overruled his duty as a judge.

Wow. That'd be interesting. But I think that you're incorrect here as well. I'll be the first to say that I have no first-hand knowledge of this, but - given the way Masons act, I would tend to believe that the judge would do his duty. If the defendant were indeed a Mason, it would probably go harder on him because I believe Freemasons are taught to do things the right way, obey the laws of their country, and be nice to everyone especially their 'Brethren' in Freemasonry.


Another form of recognition towards the freemasons are the monuments made by the masons all over the United States.

Okay ... ya got me stumped with that one. I'm sure there are Freemasons who are builders (all over the world, not just in the United States of America), but what do you mean by this 'form of recognition' thing? I'm sure the Masons have all the secret handshakes and stuff I've seen on YouTube ... but how does a building give a handshake?

Your pal,
Meat.



posted on Jan, 10 2008 @ 07:29 AM
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Originally posted by sworn2secrecy

For instance, if a mason was in a court hearing, the defendant would flash the judge a sign, and if the judge were a mason he would rule in favor of the defendant because his Masonic duty overruled his duty as a judge. The masons had such an influence in these types of situations that they could get away with murder, if it meant protecting the mason from punishment.



You do realize that ALL Masons are sworn to uphold the laws of their country, and NOT to aid a brother in doing anything against them.Obstruction of justice would obviously not be upholding the laws of your country.



posted on Jan, 10 2008 @ 07:57 AM
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I always thought, and it was explained to me thus when I was a Mason, that first off at the lower level you get that spiel "upholding the laws", then you get the next level of spiel which is backing up a brother for anything he's done save a capital crime and then at the Royal Arch level we are told to just back a brother up... against the world. That would include crimes. And often has.



posted on Jan, 10 2008 @ 10:26 AM
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Originally posted by DogHead
I always thought, and it was explained to me thus when I was a Mason, that first off at the lower level you get that spiel "upholding the laws", then you get the next level of spiel which is backing up a brother for anything he's done save a capital crime and then at the Royal Arch level we are told to just back a brother up... against the world. That would include crimes. And often has.


I do not believe that this is true. While I'm sure that there are obligations that Masons swear to, I sincerely doubt that there are any 'spiels' that they'd have to 'get.'

I'm also pretty certain that - as a Mason progresses through the degrees - any oaths or obligations would probably build on the preceding ones, as Freemasonry seems to be a 'building' process.

If you're talking about Royal Arch degrees, those are part of the York Rite (in the U.S.), and are a concordant body, and are not part of a Lodge that give out the three degrees. Whether they have a 'spiel' or not I cannot say...but, again, I'm betting that they don't. And, especially with the York Rite, I would imagine that you're also incorrect in your understanding there, too. I believe that there are actually degrees that require you don't break the laws of man or a Christian-based God.

Your pal,
Meat.



posted on Jan, 10 2008 @ 10:30 AM
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It's pretty hard to be incorrect in your understanding by the time you buggerise around at the higher degrees. It's tremendous nonsense that I am delighted to be well rid of, but I am tolerably certain, by which I mean completely certain, that I got the correct idea as to what was being explained to me. They sort of set their hearts on that after all.


[edit on 10/1/08 by DogHead]



posted on Jan, 10 2008 @ 11:06 AM
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Originally posted by DogHead
It's pretty hard to be incorrect in your understanding by the time you buggerise around at the higher degrees. It's tremendous nonsense that I am delighted to be well rid of, but I am tolerably certain, by which I mean completely certain, that I got the correct idea as to what was being explained to me. They sort of set their hearts on that after all.


Again, the one overriding problem that I have with conspiracy theorists and others who post here are dearth of facts.

The one thing that is consistent - at least in this forum - between all the posts is that the information is never ever first hand; it's always a translation, a parroting, something someone once said to someone, etc.

Why is that? Why is there no solid proof? No solid facts? The only persons - especially here on this forum when writing about Freemasonry - that post first-person accounts seem to be the few that have some Masonic provenance.

Your pal,
Meat.



posted on Jan, 10 2008 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by DogHead
I always thought, and it was explained to me thus when I was a Mason, that first off at the lower level you get that spiel "upholding the laws", then you get the next level of spiel which is backing up a brother for anything he's done save a capital crime and then at the Royal Arch level we are told to just back a brother up... against the world. That would include crimes. And often has.


If you honestly did take any of the Masonic degrees (which, by the way, I highly doubt) and all you got out of the lessons was "speils"; you undoubtedly didn't comprehend the degrees at all.

A Mason is taught in the VERY FIRST Degree to "patiently submit to legal authority" To "back a Brother for anything he's done" (as you say) would be illegal if what he's done is illegal and therefore AGAINST Masonic teaching. Period.

Also, where in the Royal Arch (one of my personal favorite Degrees) do we simply say one must "back a Brother up" ?

Methinks you have read too much freemasonrywatch.com



posted on Jan, 10 2008 @ 11:54 AM
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Originally posted by DogHead
I always thought, and it was explained to me thus when I was a Mason, that first off at the lower level you get that spiel "upholding the laws", then you get the next level of spiel which is backing up a brother for anything he's done save a capital crime and then at the Royal Arch level we are told to just back a brother up... against the world. That would include crimes. And often has.


No, that most certainly is NOT told in Masonry, at the Royal Arch or anywhere else.

Nor would someone who is really a Mason call the Royal Arch a "level". What was it you were saying about "frauds"?



posted on Jan, 10 2008 @ 05:47 PM
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I am calling BS on you EVER being a Freemason.You use fringe conspiracy logic (degrees being "levels", giving you power over others, making you exempt from the laws of your country) that had you in actuality ever been involved in any manner with Freemasonry, you would know are obvious untruths. Which begs the question, if you are lying about Freemasonry, and trying to intentionally mislead others in the belief that you were involved, what else are you lying about?Funny you were so quick to call ritual magickians "frauds", and pose questions about the mental health of those involved.I would call someone posing as an ex-Freemason a "fraud", and question the mental health of one involved in attention seeking behavior, and weaving a web of lies to mislead others.Try having some truth and integrity in your posts in the future.




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