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How to solve America's water problems

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posted on Jan, 7 2008 @ 08:08 PM
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How to solve America's water problems


www.salon.com

As his state endures its worst drought in a century, Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue is praying for rain. Lake Lanier, the reservoir that waters the endlessly growing colossus of metro Atlanta, is receding from its banks, shriveling to a shiny puddle. Georgia has restricted car washing and lawn watering. It has shut off its outdoor fountains.

In San Diego, which just experienced its driest summer in recorded history, the hills are charred from October's wildfires. The state of California is so tapped out that the pumps that carry water from the Sacramento River to San Diego were tightened in December. Water authorities are urging San Diegans to tear up their grass and replace it with cactus and succulent.

Bill Richardson, governor of arid New Mexico, had his region's plight in mind when he told the Las Vegas Sun that Northern states need to start sharing their water: "I want a national water policy. We need a dialogue between states to deal with issues like water conservation, water reuse technology, water delivery and water production. States like Wisconsin are awash in water."

Sun Belters, there's a man in Detroit with the answer to your water problems. "They can have all the water they want," says Hugh McDiarmid Jr. of the Michigan Environmental Council. "All they have to do is move here." There's plenty of room. Some Detroit neighborhoods are so bereft of houses that pheasants hide in the vacant lots. And the cost of living is unbeatable. Earlier this year, an auctioneer was trying to unload a bungalow for $18,000. When no one would bid, he reminded his audience, "You get the land under the house, too."
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.chicagotribune.com




posted on Jan, 7 2008 @ 08:08 PM
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Been wondering how Detroit might recover from its post-industrial demise? Possibly with millions of the nations citizens who live in Sun Belt states and cities coming to the realization that although they crave the sun, they need fresh water more. Over the past 20 years or so there has been a mass migration of the nations youngest and brightest to the Sun Belt states in search of fun, sunglasses, and modern economies. This is been greatly facilitated by the development of new technologies, and the industries that have grown around them. But if you're living in the desert, no technology is more important than air conditioning, and no resource is more valuable than fresh water. Now in the midst of one of the nation's longest droughts in history, people are beginning to wonder where they are going to get their next drink of H2O from. Those from the Northeast and Midwest were able to take their lawns with them to the desert and water them with the use of water collected and redirected from damns and aqueducts, nearly draining Lake Lanier, the Apalachicola River, and the Colorado River. Now the populations of the Sun Belt region are beginning to wonder if they've made the right trade-off, choosing sun and mild climate over fresh water. Whatever they decide to do, they'd better not seriously entertain the idea of tapping the Great Lakes and piping its contents to aid their needs.


In other words: You wanted to go live in that sandbox. Don't come crying back to us when you can't find anything to drink. Rep. Vernon Ehlers, R-Lake Michigan, was even more belligerent. He threatened to "call up the militia" to defend his region's water.



"Water diversion is the third rail of Great Lakes politics," says Peter Annin, author of "The Great Lakes Water Wars." "It's the one issue that unites Democrats and Republicans. Bill Richardson's candidacy is over because of his comments. You throw Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New York out of the mix, it's really hard to win an election."


Democratic Party's candidate and Governor of New Mexico, Bill Richardson, made the mistake of saying, "Wait a minute! If we can pipe oil across Alaska, we can pipe water from Lake Michigan." Too bad for him.

Right before our very eyes, and for some of us, our empty glasses, the gold rush is slowly transmuting into a rush for fresh water. There's water in them there hills, for sure. Just don't try to take it with you if you plan on leaving. And definitely don't come trying to steal it later on once you've remembered that you've left something important behind. You might have to face some who are willing to defend the Great Lakes to the death. However, you're more than welcome to move on back in with the family once you realize that bottles of sunscreen do not have enough water in it to hold you and your family over until the next time it rains.



www.salon.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jan, 7 2008 @ 08:50 PM
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There's lots of water North of the border...

Lets invade Canada!!


But seriously, once the borders come down with the creation of the NAU, the PTB, along with that big road they got planned, will just pipe the water down to wherever they want.

Anyone who protests will be shipped off to the camps...



posted on Jan, 7 2008 @ 09:06 PM
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Lake levels in the Great Lakes has just hit a new low. Tell Bill not to start the pipeline and perhaps reconsider his presidential run if he plans to steal water from the northern states.
Besides, Detroit isn't very friendly sharing water with its neighboring suburbs, let alone southern states.

www.macombdaily.com...

www.upi.com...
www.contracostatimes.com...

Water wars:
www.detnews.com.../20080107/METRO/801070366


apc

posted on Jan, 7 2008 @ 09:08 PM
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*points west* HA HA HAAAA!!!

Damn dirty hippies. At least they won't miss showering.

I


apc

posted on Jan, 7 2008 @ 09:11 PM
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ack

[edit on 7-1-2008 by apc]


MBF

posted on Jan, 7 2008 @ 11:00 PM
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First, people should be aware of what is going around them. I received a call from a relative and was asked if I had heard anything about a water shortage. I said yes I had and was then asked if it was real. He didn't know anything about a water shortage until his wife came in from college one night and said that the school had cut off all the water fountains.

Atlanta now knows that they are vulnerable to water shortages and the problem will only get worse. They should be digging the lakes deeper while they are low so they will hold more water.

I think that part of Atlanta's problem was that they are required by law to release a certain amount of water each day.

LINK

Their best bet to help prevent future water problems is to make the lake hold more water.



posted on Jan, 8 2008 @ 07:00 AM
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reply to post by apc
 


Yeah. "Live Free, Die Thirsty."


Couldn't resist that one. Not that I have anything against hippies. Just a joke. Some of my best friends are hippies.




[edit on 8-1-2008 by Areal51]



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