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Warning: Vacate room when CFL bulb breaks

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posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 09:58 AM
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Warning: Vacate room when CFL bulb breaks


www.wnd.com

Less than a month after the U.S. Congress passed an energy bill banning the incandescent light bulb by 2014, the UK Environment Agency issued guidelines calling for evacuation of any room where an energy-saving compact fluorescent light bulb is broken, releasing toxic mercury.

Users who break a bulb should vacate the room for at least 15 minutes, the new guidelines say. The debris should not be removed with a vacuum cleaner, which could put toxic dust into the air, but with rubber gloves. The broken glass and all residue is to be placed into a sealed plastic bag and taken to a local official recycling site for proper disposal.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 09:58 AM
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This is another case of what the government says is good for you, is actually incredibly bad for you.
Flourescent bulbs should also be avoided if they break also. but those had not been mandated by the government.

www.wnd.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 10:12 AM
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Why are we even messing with these Crappy Fluorescent Lighting things?

We should be skipping this stupid, toxic, ugly and unhealthy technology and putting all our efforts into replacing incandescent bulbs with LEDs, IMHO:


National Energy Savings:

If every U.S. household replaced just one standard 60 watt bulb with a CC Vivid LED bulb, we could save 24,184,400,000 watts or 24,184.4 mega (million) watts per day.

National savings information based on 103,000,000 households with an average use of 4 hrs per day per house. Based on gross watts.

One of the largest power plants in the U.S. could be eliminated as a result of each U.S. household replacing just one standard 60 watt bulb with a CC Vivid LED Light bulb.
Source | ccrane.com | LED Light Bulbs


apc

posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 10:20 AM
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Color Changing Party Light Bulb - Caution: The festive flare has been known to instantly start a party.




I've broken CFLs before and I'm no more insane than I already was.

Isn't mercury the same as lead as far as exposure harm is concerned? That is, you need constant exposure over a long period of time before any detrimental effects can be observed?



posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by apc
 


Yeah, I cracked a CFL over my head in the attic awhile back, that's prolly another reason I don't much care for them...


I don't know if I was coughing from that or all the fiberglass floating around up there, but I was choked up for a while.

Should have been wearing a respirator.

But then again, I haven't noticed any additional additional brain damage lately, lately, lately, but if I'd realized the mercury hazard, I would have cleared out for a while.

Having a warning on the package couldn't hurt, couldn't hurt....would be a good thing...



posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 11:09 AM
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What if a toddler breaks one of these and plays around with it for a while, or if it gets cracked in a lamp and no one notices it for several days? Who decided this was safe, and to whom may we appeal to keep these out of our homes, if so desired?

They recall toys that have square edges. Will this also get recalled, once they are in use by the billion and destroying people?



posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 11:09 AM
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if people were serious about saving energy, they would include production and disposal costs in their consideration.


in the case of flourescent lights, the transformer's coils are tossed everytime a lamp fails, even though a modular design (just take the lamp of and plug a new one onto the base unit) could easily overcome that issue. if you consider the cost of recycling all these mercury filled concoctions, the overall cost and risk becomes disproportinally dominant in comparison to any real or imagined energy saving, because lighting is responsible only for a small portion of electric consumption anyway.

LEDs are of course much more attractive since they work with low voltage DC, making most household wiring much safer and cheaper while an car battery can serve as a week's backup.


it's not about the environment, it's about money - yours to be exact. guess who's going to pay for it all?



posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 12:03 PM
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Originally posted by goosdawg
Why are we even messing with these Crappy Fluorescent Lighting things?

We should be skipping this stupid, toxic, ugly and unhealthy technology and putting all our efforts into replacing incandescent bulbs with LEDs, IMHO:



Stop making sense or they will come and get you.
I have to agree completely with you on the LED lights. I actually don't like the cold feeling and 60hz hum from fluorescent lighting period, not to mention hazards.

Canada has actually outlawed them as well and slowing making them obsolete.



posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 12:06 PM
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Originally posted by apc

I've broken CFLs before and I'm no more insane than I already was.

Isn't mercury the same as lead as far as exposure harm is concerned? That is, you need constant exposure over a long period of time before any detrimental effects can be observed?



APC,

Read my thread on Mercury and the hazards behind it. Scary stuff.


www.abovetopsecret.com...'



posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 12:07 PM
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Originally posted by apc
Isn't mercury the same as lead as far as exposure harm is concerned? That is, you need constant exposure over a long period of time before any detrimental effects can be observed?



Here's a little info about mercury poisoning:

Wikipedia - Mercury poisoning


with sufficient exposure all mercury-based toxins damage the central nervous system and other organs or organ systems such as the liver or gastrointestinal tract.

Symptoms typically include sensory impairment (vision, hearing, speech), disturbed sensation and a lack of coordination. The type and degree of symptoms exhibited depend up on the individual toxin, the dose, and the method and duration of exposure.

Due to its toxicity, there have been campaigns in many countries to ban mercury altogether
.





Exposure to mercury can occur from breathing contaminated air.



Meaning broken fluorescent bulbs.



The amount of mercury in a standard lamp can vary dramatically, from 3 to 46 mg. [16] Newer lamps contain less mercury and the 3-4 mg versions are sold as low-mercury types. A typical 2006-era 4 ft (122 cm) T-12 fluorescent lamp (i.e., F32T12) contains about 12 milligrams of mercury[17]. In early 2007, the National Electrical Manufacturers Association in the US announced that "Under the voluntary commitment, effective April 15, 2007, participating manufacturers will cap the total mercury content in CFLs under 25 watts at 5 milligrams (mg) per unit. CFLs that use 25 to 40 watts of electricity will have total mercury content capped at 6 mg per unit."[18]



What to Do if a Fluorescent Light Bulb Breaks - EPA


Fluorescent light bulbs contain a very small amount of mercury sealed within the glass tubing. EPA recommends the following clean-up and disposal guidelines:

1.Open a window and leave the room for 15 minutes or more.

2.Carefully scoop up the fragments and powder with stiff paper or cardboard and place them in a sealed plastic bag.
*Use disposable rubber gloves, if available (i.e., do not use bare hands). Wipe the area clean with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes and place them in the plastic bag.
*Do not use a vacuum or broom to clean up the broken bulb on hard surfaces.

3. Place all cleanup materials in a second sealed plastic bag.
*Place the first bag in a second sealed plastic bag and put it in the outdoor trash container or in another outdoor protected area for the next normal trash disposal.
Note: Some states prohibit such trash disposal and require that broken and unbroken lamps be taken to a local recycling center.
*Wash your hands after disposing of the bag.

4. If a fluorescent bulb breaks on a rug or carpet:
*First, remove all materials you can without using a vacuum cleaner, following the steps above. Sticky tape (such as duct tape) can be used to pick up small pieces and powder.
*If vacuuming is needed after all visible materials are removed, vacuum the area where the bulb was broken, remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister) and put the bag or vacuum debris in two sealed plastic bags in the outdoor trash or protected outdoor location for normal disposal.



Since there is only a couple of milligrams (1/1,000,000th of a kilogram) in each fluorescent bulb, there really doesn't seem to be that much of a risk if the bulb breaks, just get out of the room for a few minutes, and when cleaning it up, don't use your bare hands.

However, if there are more efficient bulbs out there that don't use mercury, why not use them, instead of a product that uses mercury and can potentially cause health problems?

[edit on 6/1/08 by Keyhole]



posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 12:19 PM
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Originally posted by OptionToChoose
What if a toddler breaks one of these and plays around with it for a while, or if it gets cracked in a lamp and no one notices it for several days?


First of all a toddler playing broken glass is going to be a bloody freakin mess no matter what the bulb type is. CFL's appear to be much sturdier than standard bulbs, but then I haven't tossed one on the floor yet.

Cracked in a lamp and nobody notices? Not likely.
The instance of the lamp being damaged is going to be same moment someone checks the bulb.

Flourescent bulbs with their toxic mercury has been around for years.
We used to break them behind stores all the time, until someone informed us of toxic mercury. You think the bulb could have skull and crossbones on it?

I agree with the above poster, we should be going directly to LED tech.
Mandated fluorescent is mandated toxins.

If someone ever wants to poison a a crowd in the future,
they just need bring a bag of light bulbs and give them a toss.


apc

posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by Keyhole
 

[space for rent]

OK then well I guess next time one breaks I'll use it as an NBC drill.



[edit on 6-1-2008 by apc]



posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 12:46 PM
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First of all a toddler playing broken glass is going to be a bloody freakin mess no matter what the bulb type is.

But it won't have mercury poisoning. Why add to the misery?



posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 12:54 PM
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My doctor brother had his study lit with mostly fiber optics that extended to the roof bringing in natural no cost (except for initial investment) natural lighting. It is cool. But I do believe LED's will be the future. Anything to get us off the nipple of the oil barrel.



posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 10:59 PM
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Originally posted by goosdawg
Why are we even messing with these Crappy Fluorescent Lighting things?

We should be skipping this stupid, toxic, ugly and unhealthy technology and putting all our efforts into replacing incandescent bulbs with LEDs, IMHO:



I've already started replacing my outdoor Christmas lights with LED lights. They use only 3 watts for a string of 70 lights. And the colors are strikingly pure and beautiful.

As for indoor lighting, I'd love to replace incandescent and CFL's with LED bulbs. However, the last time I looked online the cost was still hugely prohibitive - something like $30 to $50 per light, depending on the type.

As a comparison, I can now get 13 watt (65 watt equivalent) CFL floodlights for $5 and 8-packs of CFL 60 watt equivalent lamp bulbs for less than $10. That means I can do something for myself and energy conservation now while waiting for LED costs to become reasonable.

[edit on 1/6/2008 by centurion1211]



posted on Jan, 6 2008 @ 11:29 PM
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reply to post by JustTheFacts
 


I broke one months ago.
Still kicking and not sick.
Took no precautions.



posted on Jan, 7 2008 @ 12:53 AM
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Originally posted by WraothAscendant
I broke one months ago.
Still kicking and not sick.
Took no precautions.


Oh yeah? You do know your avatar is a photo and not a 3D render, right?
Lookin' a little pale there.

I stole liquid mercury from my Science class in 8th grade, with my bare hands.
Teacher showed us how cool it was, never said touching it could be dangerous.
I lived.



posted on Jan, 7 2008 @ 02:00 AM
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reply to post by Legalizer
 



mmmmmk. I must see something different when I look in the mirror.



posted on Jan, 8 2008 @ 06:19 AM
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Something doesn't smell right here. The low energy bulb is simply a mini version of the long tube fluorescent. Now as far as I am aware there hsan't been a huge fuss over them has there? I would not be suprised if this was all a scare tactic initiated by the manufacturers of tungsten light bulbs or some idiot with influence who doesn't want to be forced to "change".

Think about it!

Note also that you are not supposed to dispose of batteries in normal waste.....yeh right like every household follows that advice!



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