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!!!Mars Blue Sky & Water!!!

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posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 06:04 PM
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reply to post by Armin
 


Wow. I didnt even know those existed untill 2 min ago.

Those skies are really blue. How is there not life?

I read in some science books that mars' air is 95% CO2. But CO2 is gray, right?




posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by shiman
 


It's not oxygen that makes the sky blue, it's the fact that the atmosphere is dense enough for scattering the light.

According to this, if a planet has a thinner atmosphere it should have less scattering, but it will still have some, making the sky a lighter blue.

All of this if I am not wrong, this is the idea I have about it, but I may be slightly wrong.



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 07:41 PM
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Originally posted by Armin
Have people forgetten the Viking mission pictures where it clearly shows that the sky is blue..


Oh yes indeed they have... the people have very short term memories and a very short attention span


[edit on 30-3-2008 by zorgon]



posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 12:14 AM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Atmospheres can be dense enough for the scattering of light, but the posibility of different colors is still there. Oxy makes the sky blue, or water, and CO2 makes it gray. Iron makes it red (or so were told)



posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by shiman
 


You may be right, but I never heard or read about it.

Could you point me to some place where I can confirm that information?

Thanks.



posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 09:33 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


First, try wikipedia. i am only 15 so i have more access to textbooks. So try your library. Or google search chemical colors or something. Its easy to tell if co2 makes the sky gray. Where i live, i can just look outside.

[edit on 31-3-2008 by shiman]



posted on Apr, 4 2008 @ 03:28 PM
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there is a 600 million human population on mars they look just like us but are not from earth
most of them live underground but some live above ground
we have been going to mars since the early 1960s and we continue going to mars
the government is just a big coverup



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 07:05 AM
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reply to post by shiman
 

After a little looking up, this is what I got.

Oxygen is not the most common gas on Earth's atmosphere, that place is occupied by Nitrogen, so if the composition of the atmosphere had an impact on the colour of the sky, that would be because o Nitrogen and not Oxygen.

If you could see a different coloured sky where you live because of CO2 then you would be dead, CO2 on the atmosphere is very low, much less than Argon or water vapour.

What makes the sky look blue is the way light is scattered by the molecules of the gases that make up the atmosphere, and that is because of the size of the molecules when compared to the wave length of the light they scatter.

If there are larger particles on the atmosphere, like dust, they are responsible for absorbing and/or reflecting light, but they do not scatter it. The effect of these larger particles is stronger than that of the scatter by the gas molecules, so a dusty atmosphere gets its colour from the characteristics of the particles while a clear atmosphere gets its colour from the density of the atmosphere.

A thinner atmosphere, like the one on Mars, should look light blue if there are no dust particles in the air, if there are then it looks like the dust particles, mostly that reddish brown.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 11:41 AM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by shiman
 

After a little looking up, this is what I got.

Oxygen is not the most common gas on Earth's atmosphere, that place is occupied by Nitrogen, so if the composition of the atmosphere had an impact on the colour of the sky, that would be because o Nitrogen and not Oxygen.

If you could see a different coloured sky where you live because of CO2 then you would be dead, CO2 on the atmosphere is very low, much less than Argon or water vapour.

What makes the sky look blue is the way light is scattered by the molecules of the gases that make up the atmosphere, and that is because of the size of the molecules when compared to the wave length of the light they scatter.

If there are larger particles on the atmosphere, like dust, they are responsible for absorbing and/or reflecting light, but they do not scatter it. The effect of these larger particles is stronger than that of the scatter by the gas molecules, so a dusty atmosphere gets its colour from the characteristics of the particles while a clear atmosphere gets its colour from the density of the atmosphere.

A thinner atmosphere, like the one on Mars, should look light blue if there are no dust particles in the air, if there are then it looks like the dust particles, mostly that reddish brown.


I can see the color of CO2 cause all i have to do is look a the hills west of me.
The sky here is still blue.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 11:57 AM
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reply to post by shiman
 


If that was true then nobody could live there, the presence of very small amounts of CO2 above normal values kills people.

Get some information about it, you will see that it's not the CO2 that makes that colour.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Arg. Do i pave to paint a portrait?

There is a little haze of gray when i look at the hills where i live. A little haze. Little. small, but still visible.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by shiman
 


But that haze is not because of the CO2, it's because of other things, probably smoke particles.

CO2 is colourless and is a greenhouse effect gas, meaning that it lets visible light pass it, but it blocks infrared light.

If it is colourless and lets visible light pass we can not see it and it is not grey.

But as I was wrong about the danger of CO2 (it is not armful in small doses, only in doses much larger (5% by volume) than normal (0.03% to 0.06% by volume)) I may be wrong about this also, but I don't think so, one of the dangers of CO2 is that it is not visible.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:17 PM
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I'm pretty sure this picture has been discussed on here before, and the notion of the blue sky.

I thought it was hilarious when I saw that too. I watched nasa's cgi presentation of their mars rover and I found it funny that they decided to put a clear blue sky in. I've seen a few mars pictures with a blue sky.


I love the b.s. system they work on.

Mars is super cold, theres no life, the sky is red, theres no water...THEN
mars has ice, the sky is blue
now i hear about water / lakes/ streams, and even possible microbes of life.

Can't you see the pattern? They're easing this information in, letting us absorb it, they don't wanna give us too much at once or we might go crazy.. Thats their belief anyway. Its the same thing with movies.. I believe they've been getting us use to these concepts this way. The concept of aliens and other liveable planets just seems to make sense to people these days, and I believe it is because of movies / tv/ games.


They know a lot about mars, a lot more then they'll tell us in my oppinion.

I remember when I was a kid i read a book about mars and it DID say there was oxygen..but it was too thick to breathe or something. Maybe mars does have a red sky at certain points, but they could have just made it red to seem more different then earth so we wouldn't get freaked out. And now they're slowly showing us how it is similar to earth.



posted on Apr, 6 2008 @ 12:09 AM
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reply to post by CavemanDD
 


I think i read somewhere that the atmospheric pressure was 2 or 3 psi below normal.



posted on Apr, 6 2008 @ 05:18 AM
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reply to post by shiman
 

Here you can see pressure and temperature values gathered by Mars Global Surveyor.

Unfortunately, we can no longer have that kind of information because contact was lost in November 2006.



posted on May, 9 2008 @ 03:56 PM
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I FOUND IT!!!!!!!!!!!11





posted on May, 9 2008 @ 09:03 PM
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reply to post by d11_m_na_c05
 


Cant...

stop...

laughing!!!



[edit on 9-5-2008 by shiman]



posted on May, 14 2008 @ 02:08 PM
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I can believe it why not I have no reason not to this government is so crooked that they'd lie about some of the smallest things why would they want us to know that there is life on mars they'd rather benefit from all of it themselves rather than help society advance



posted on Jul, 30 2008 @ 08:00 AM
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Ok, first thing is first. The "lake" in the far right is not a lake. At least not anymore. 2 reasons. The blue sediment goes up the base of the hill. From the perspective of the camera, a lake would look flat, in fact you wouldn't be able to see it because of the hill that comes before it. 2. If this were water there would be a reflection caused by the sun. No reflection. This is the remains of some element. The wave patterns are like those observed in deserts. The wind causes the waves in all directions. Of course wind blows in all directions. Again, if these were actually waves on a liquid surface, the form of the wave+liquid would cause reflections on all angles.



posted on Jul, 30 2008 @ 08:19 AM
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strange - the sun is somewhere in the front right side of the lander (see the shadow cast on the dial for confirmation) so what's causing the very bright reflection on the red sticky up thing on the right? (sorry don't know it's technical name)



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