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Who has the best Special Forces ?

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posted on Jan, 28 2006 @ 12:24 AM
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Originally posted by Grimnal
id like to see those british sas deal with weather in australia let alone iraq i mean most of australia is 35 degres celcius everyday and can reach 49 in the inner country australia is a desert man i live here those british dont train in wagga wagga or desert climates for years (live there).




I face such weather everyday!!




posted on Jan, 29 2006 @ 06:05 PM
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Originally posted by Captain_Sensible

Originally posted by Grimnal
id like to see those british sas deal with weather in australia let alone iraq i mean most of australia is 35 degres celcius everyday and can reach 49 in the inner country australia is a desert man i live here those british dont train in wagga wagga or desert climates for years (live there).


You do realise that one of the SAS's first and most distinguished campaigns (A full campaign, not just a mission!) was in Africa in WWII don't you?


Maybe someone needs to Google the words Oman, Jebel Akhdar and Mirbat?

Or just look at Gulf War 1?

Anyway, for Desert/Bush I still say the Sealous Scouts were the best. No glory boys in jeeps and utes, just a lot of hard yakka in the scrub.

Somewhere close to them would have to come the Portuguese paras who had to do the whole "de-colonisation wars" bit in southern Africa. But that's a specific example of practically main-force combat units doing a specialist job.

US Army Rangers? Give me RMCs any day. Hell, I'd almost say give me 4RAR, but they haven't seen major combat yet.



posted on Feb, 1 2006 @ 10:04 AM
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Its official - India's special forces are the best.


Mention ‘Special Forces’ and the intrepid Israelis, the gung-ho Americans or the secretive British come to mind. But, it appears that it is the Indians who are the toughest of them all. This is what a gruelling contest determined last week.
The Israelis were not there, but a team of India’s 10 Special Forces (SF), led by Captain Krishnadas, outshone their counterparts from the US, South Africa, U.K., France, hosts Botswana and a clutch of African nations in the Kalahari desert.

A proud Special Forces officer says this is all the more creditable since the teams, each comprising of an officer, a non-commissioned officer and three paratroopers “were pulled out of active duty and given just two months to prepare.” This is the first time India has been invited to participate in the event. Last year’s competition was won by the South African Special Forces.

The event required a trek of 87 kms over three days with full combat load of 50 kg, all the activity being conducted under the desert sun during the day. The contest was kicked off on June 8 by a paradrop of the teams close to the border with Namibia. The events then progressively moved them east towards the Okavango Delta.

Here the team led by Major Animish Ranade suffered a mishap at the outset when Commando Mool Singh’s parachute did not open and his emergency parachute landed him so hard that he fractured his ankle. Despite the mishap that cost the team points, it won the individual prize in the 35 kms endurance march that followed.

On June 9, Capt Krishandas’s team, scored with the individual prize for the navigation segment where the commandos have to move through 20 kms of trackless desert with just a compass, Ranade’s team stood second. This was topped by a casualty evacuation exercise that required them to carry a 50 kg deadweight, simulating a casualty, for 10 kms. Krishandas’ team stood first and Ranade’s second. On the last day the teams did a 17 kms speed march and Krishandas’ team again scored a first.

The Indians performed well in the other elements of the competition as well. These included a rifle and pistol firing competition, a 400 metre an observation lane exercise requiring them to spot seven targets and a final 5 kms home run that makes the grand finale of the gathering.

A senior officer told TNN that such competitions “which deal with our core business,” are a great boost for the professional elan of the force. India currently has four SF units that have traditionally been asked to do the toughest jobs in the battlefield.

Currently they specialise in counter-terrorist work where using their own intelligence, they operate independently against terrorist concentrations in remote mountain and jungle regions in Kashmir and the Northeast.
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cmo

posted on Feb, 1 2006 @ 04:03 PM
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im from the u.s. but that doesnt influence my vote. I have read that the brittish camandoes were primarly responsible for the training regime of the airborn rangers back in WWII,and thats a pretty tough unit ,so I would say that they (the brits)would have to be up there on the charts.I have read a little on special forces and special forces training,and i agree that the delta force is one of the best teams of commandos ever put together(reason,primarly because they only the best soldiers,marines,sailors,and even there own pilots and medical staff from the different millitary branches.

But there are a couple of more units I would like throw in the picture.THE U.S MARINES FORCE RECON who may be a little over commerlized but nontheless are an exceptionly well conditioned and skilled force of amphibiouse cammandoes.Another is THE AIR FORCE PARA RESCUE TEAM their over all survival,combat,medical,amphibious,and ofcourse airborn capabilities make them my number one pick.



posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 05:32 PM
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SAS

They are and will remain the benchmark for elite units world wide, the people who argue that it is just their enhanced media image (since the 1980 Iranian Embassy siege) that gives the impression they are the best, need to understand that the regiment operated before they were known to the world. Important things like their personnel remain secret, but a reputation goes before them giving the future soldiers in the regiment something to uphold.



posted on Feb, 3 2006 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by American Mad Man

Originally posted by Private_parts
Who are the best??

Ok first of all US Special Forces are trained in very small areas - there are jungle units, desert units mountain units etc. ---they cannot do everything!
While all special forces are extremely tough and determined men - there are several units throughout the world that have really distinguished themselves on the battlefield.


This is just plain incorrect and false.

You act like the SEALs haven't participated in operations in Vietnam (jungle), South America (Jungle), Afghanistan (Mountains), and Iraq (Desert).

SEALs are trained for every type of insertion, that includes from submarines and HALO jumps. You act like they are only underwater demolition specialists, or CT specialists. You are just plain incorrect here.

If you want to get down to the TRUE differences, it is mainly philosophy. The Brits tend to be more cautious then others. Americans tend to be more gung-ho. Russians tend to be more ruthless. Isrealis tend to be more cunning.

Like I said before, the differences in operation capability are very small. Maybe for underwater demolition you want SEALs slightly above SBS. Maybe you want Delta force slightly ahead of SAS for CT. Maybe you want SAS slightly ahead of the Green Berrets for recon. Maybe you want the GBs slightly ahead of so and so for spurring a local uprising.

As it is, the AS were the ones that trained US special forces originally. They wrote the old testament on it. Most of what the US does is based on their training. The US has more experience now how ever in the last 2 decades.

Frankly, to really say who the "best" is, you have to go down to specific unit vs unit, and even soldier vs soldier.


LMAO!! SAS cautious!!



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 04:17 PM
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sbs/sas are by far the best trained special forces in the world with out doubt. There training is by far the longest and hardest. It never really ends. There pass out rate is the lowest in any special forces. Finishes with 6 months jungle traing which is hell!! Forget seals as long as you can swim its a piece of cake and has a high pass out rate in comparison to the SBS. Delta forces have some of the best equipment i have seen along with the seals. But this dosent make a good SF. The difference between U.S and UK SF is that UK dont relay on technolgy like US special ops. They are good at thinking on their feet and adapting plans to suite the situation. When i worked with seals they were well motivated and well trained but the were also really good a shooting each other and when there plan fell apart the were easly stopped in the tracks!

The SAS ans SBS virtually trained the rest of the worlds SF forces including seal, delta, SG9, ASAS. They also have a long history of active service to give them experince unlike many othe SF forces. Falklands, N. Ireland, afgan, Bosnia, Oman, World war II, Gulf 1 & 2, Iranian embassy.

Christ the U.S. SF get medals for flying over countries at war! never mind fighting in them..

SAS/SBS are also the most valued and respected security personnel by far. just look at Iraq every one wants a SBS or SAS guy , nobody wants an x seal or Delta as they ride round in big shiny new 4x4 and then they wonder why they get shot to #!

Best intel- Mossad! sneaker #ers..
Best para reg - UK paras/green berets
Best mountain warefare - Mountain leaders Royal marines - simply brilliant
Best sea- SBS by far
Best ground -SAS/ASAS
Best Counter-terrorism- SAS they fire more rounds in a day than SWAT do in a year
Best Blue on Blue - US marines they #ing love it..



posted on Feb, 10 2006 @ 09:41 AM
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Not really special forces but certainly a contender. I noticed that the Gurkhas have not been mentioned. These people come from almost nothing and I think that is what makes them so tough. They have served under the British Army for almost 200yrs.

www.nepalesekhukuri.com...



posted on Feb, 24 2006 @ 08:38 AM
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Portugal have a Special Force too, called GOE "Grupo de Operações Especiais " in english: Special Operations Unit.
Its verry dificult to be a member, they are chosen from an elite members of military.

Sorry my english.




posted on Feb, 24 2006 @ 09:50 AM
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Originally posted by johnwalker Christ the U.S. SF get medals for flying over countries at war! never mind fighting in them..

SAS/SBS are also the most valued and respected security personnel by far. just look at Iraq every one wants a SBS or SAS guy , nobody wants an x seal or Delta as they ride round in big shiny new 4x4 and then they wonder why they get shot to #!

Best intel- Mossad! sneaker #ers..
Best para reg - UK paras/green berets
Best mountain warefare - Mountain leaders Royal marines - simply brilliant
Best sea- SBS by far
Best ground -SAS/ASAS
Best Counter-terrorism- SAS they fire more rounds in a day than SWAT do in a year
Best Blue on Blue - US marines they #ing love it..




Ok mate, I am English so I too take pride in our military, but you really need to stop the blind worship. I would agree that our Special Forces are good at thinking on their feet and working with crappy equipment and intelligence, but you need not rag on the Americans.

[edit on 24-2-2006 by Captain_Sensible]



posted on Feb, 26 2006 @ 05:55 PM
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Originally posted by johnwalker
Best Blue on Blue - US marines they #ing love it..


At this point I'd say the USAF are into blue-on-blue more than USMC, just ask the Fusiliers, or the Canadians...or the BBC...



posted on Feb, 27 2006 @ 06:58 PM
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It is really hard to identify the "best" special forces team, they usually don't go out and play paintball against eachother and see who the victor is, I say usually don't because I have heard of the Spetnazz playing against the Rangers on some occasions. I am not sure if this unit has been mentioned, I am sure they have been, but the US Delta Force is in my oppinion if not the best at least in the top three. They are active all year long in operations we will never hear about and are no stranger to some action. But if we were to say the best, I would say it would be a unit we don't know about. Probably either a US team or Israeli I would say, I have heard of this supposed Israeli unit called "Demon Unit", sounds very intimidating..lol...but I can't find any more info on that unit.



posted on Mar, 1 2006 @ 03:53 PM
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All of the U.S. Special Operations forces are active all-year round in operations we don't hear about and they all do different things. THE "Special Forces" are of the United States Army. The term "Special Forces" is just a generic term used by the media. The Special Forces are one of the U.S. military's Special Operations Forces.

These are:
U.S. Army Special Forces - specialize in going into foreign countries, learning the culture and language, building rapport, knowing how to blend in, and teach foreign soldiers. SF soldiers are teachers. They do not have mandatory HALO/HAHO training and SCUBA training, however, many SF soldiers attend SCUBA school and Military Free-Fall (MFF school that teaches HALO/HAHO). There are MFF SF teams and combat SCUBA SF teams. There are SF Mountain teams too.

Delta Force - No one really knows if there is a Delta Force or not. It is believed to exist, but no one knows for sure. There is a former Spec Ops guy who wrote a book on Delta and got a lot of heat and lost all respect from the Special Operations community. Whenever any Spec Ops soldier writes a book about their career, there is a committee that they are encouraged to have review the book to make sure it has nothing confidential in it. This author did not give his book to the committee, published it, and thus released a lot of classified stuff on what is supposedly Delta Force. One of the Generals supposedly wanted to hang him for it.

Supposedly, Delta was started when, in the 70s, an SF soldier came back from training with the British SAS and said America needed something similar (though this might be the Special Forces Detachment-Delta you hear about, too; I am not sure there).

U.S. Navy SEALs - These guys are a commando unit. They are the king of combat SCUBA diving operations in the U.S. Special Operations community. There was a push by the Navy some while ago to have the Rangers and the Special Forces give up their SCUBA teams and hand all SCUBA missions to the SEALs. The Rangers agreed but SF said no because SF and SEALs are different, and while SEALs are the SCUBA kings, there are certain missions that may require a team to go in via SCUBA that only SF, and not SEALs, could do, or would be best suited for. SF SCUBA gets most of their combat SCUBA knowledge from the SEALs, though (and SEALs get knowledge from SF on things too). I read one SF soldier saying when he was on a SF SCUBA team and they did a mission with the SEALs, the SEALs thought they would be a hazard, slowing them down, but then he said the SEALs were "pleasantly surprised" with them. SEALs, like SF, specialize in everything from desert to arctic to jungle warfare.

U.S. Army Rangers - Rangers are the most elite Infantry out there, pretty much. For infantry troops, you really don't get any better. You have your line/leg units, you units that specialize in Air Assault (101st Airborne Division), your Airborne units (82nd Airborne Division), your Mountain units (10th Mountain Division), then you have the Rangers, who can do all that. Rangers do the most intensive physical training of all the Spec Ops soldiers. They get much more funding then regular Infantry units, get much more training (more physical training, more martial arts training, more land nav, much for shooting practice, etc...). Many regular Army Infantryman don't like Rangers and say they aren't that good (they hate SF too). It really depends. A new recruit fresh to the Ranger Regiment probably won't have as much knowledge or be nearly as good an Infantryman who's been with a regular unit for more years, or one who has been through Ranger School especially.

Rangers these days aren't just plain 'ole Infantryman with the best infantry training, though; they are Spec Ops soldiers, and thus do lots of unconventional training, with SWAT-style tactics and all that.

Ranger School teaches leadership and is a very tough school (one of the most difficult in the world). SF soldiers, Navy SEALS, regular Infantryman, etc...all attend Ranger School (and since reg. Infantryman go through Ranger School and SEALS go through it too, many regular Infantryman get really hot and bothered when people say SEALs are much better then they are). Again, I think it just depends on who has been through what training, experiences, etc..... Ranger School has the initial phase, the Jungle phase, the Desert phase, and the Mountain phase. Soldiers are taught everything from bayonet fighting to hand-to-hand martial arts, to advanced rappelling techniques (both U.S. and foreign rappelling techniques), rope-bridge building, all sorts of patrolling and land navigation, etc...while putting soldiers through grueling conditions ranging from sweltering heat to freezing cold to lack of food and severe lack of sleep. They learn jungle and mountain and desert warfare. Ranger School essentially teaches a set of very valuable military skills that in our time of being so technologically advanced, the military still reveres greatly. A soldier from the old Roman days or a knight from the Middle Ages would be at home in Ranger School, aside from getting used to the modern equipment.

And BTW, that is why it is stupid to say the U.S. military relies solely on technology, the way so many people love to harp.

U.S. Air Force Pararescueman - These soldiers are the rescue guys of the Spec Ops community. They specialize in trauma medicine, and have mandatory combat SCUBA training, MFF training, mountain training, etc....essentially they are trauma medics who can go in via any delivery method.

This is how you can see how Spec Ops differ. You might have an SF SCUBA team that can go in and live in secret for months behind enemy lines, building rapport and teaching foreign soldiers, but that particular team won't have the skills of MFF or the advanced trauma medical skills that the entire team of Pararescueman will. Nor the mountain training. SF has medics trained the same as Pararescueman, but not all SF guys are medics. On the flip side, while the Pararescueman are trained in all sorts of delivery methods and trauma medicine, you can't send Pararescueman into a foreign country to live in secrecy and build rapport and teach the foreign soldiers. It isn't what they do. No Spec Ops team can do everything. Pararescueman are the best at what they do, though.

U.S. Air Force Air Combat Controllers - In short, they are the same as Pararescueman, except instead of being trauma medics, they go in and act as air combat controllers, capable of being delivered in any method. They are the troops you would deliver via SCUBA, MFF, or whatever, into a foreign country, so that they can guide in the fighter jets that need to bomb that area. SF soldiers can do this too, but not as well.

This is one of the reasons where they say no matter how much tech you have, you always need to put boots on the ground.

Marine Force Recon - These teams used to be considered on par with Spec ops teams and "Spec Ops-capable," but now the Marine Corps has made them part of its own Special Operations command, so I think they are officially Spec Ops. They get combat diving training I believe, lots of reconaissance training, etc...I have heard they are underfunded, though. Although each version of the U.S. Military's Spec Ops belongs to a certain branch of service, they don't get their funding from that branch. So Navy SEALs don't get any funding from the Navy, Army SF don't get funded by the Army, etc...they get funded by the Special Operations Command. This is because much of the regular military does not like Spec Ops and won't give them the funding they need, which is what started the Special Operations Command in the first place. Since Marine Force Recon is part of the the Marine Corps and not Spec Ops Command, they get funded by the Marine Corps instead. If they are now part of Spec Ops, hopefully this will change. Recon guys would get old equipment and not enough rounds, whereas SF soldiers would get all the brand-new equipment they wanted and too many rounds, to the point that they'd sometimes just have to burn them off.

U.S. Navy Special Warfare Combatant-craft Crewman - These soldiers get similar training as SEALs. They are Airborne-qualified. They specialize in the boats that carry the SEALs and other Spec Ops into their missions. If you see a big boat carrying a group of SEALs on it, the men manning the guns on the boat and the driver are most likely SWCCs, not SEALs. They get lots of weapons training, as is expected.

U.S. Army 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (SOAR) - These are essentially the best helicopter pilots on the face of the Earth. They fly the most advanced helos around and are experts at the ability to fly very low and very fast in complete darkness, through bad weather. Their "customers" include all the Spec Ops, from SF to Rangers to SEALs.

U.S. Air Force Special Ops pilots - These are basically the Air Force's version of the SOAR. They too fly the most advanced helos around (they fly different helos than the Army does though), and I guess depending on what helos a mission needs decides if the SOAR or if the Air Force is called to fly whatever team in.

As you can see, there is no way to classify any "best" Special Operations Force, because they all do different things. You wouldn't send SEALs in on a mission best suited for Special Forces soldiers just because it requires entrance via SCUBA. You'd use an SF SCUBA team. On a similar note, you don't send SF in to do a Pararescueman's job either. It differs though. There is SEAL Team Six, the fabled hostage-rescue team of the SEALs, so you might send them in instead of Pararescueman for some things, I don't know. PJ's I believe are who rescued Jessica Lynch, so who knows. All of them cross-over somewhat in skills.

You will hear Navy SEALs say SF soldiers can't swim, you will hear SF soldiers say the land-navigation skills of SEALs stink, you will hear Rangers knock them both on things, etc...but there is no official "best." They each are the best at what they do, and they all highly-respect each other as far as I know.

One other thing; if a Spec Ops team is sent in to do a mission that bombs out, many times it isn't even their fault, it is the service's fault. For example, in Panama, many people say the SEALs messed that up badly. In reality, the SEALs did what they were told to, the problem was the Navy itself. The mission was to retake an airfield, which was best suited for Army Rangers, which was the original plan. Send in a battalion of Rangers and they'd retake the field. The Navy wanted a piece of the pie, however, and said the SEALs could do it. The Rangers were far greater in number, specialized in this kind of stuff, and would've parachuted in. The SEALs went in via the water and came up on the beach. The bad part was this: for one, there weren't enough of them, so the Navy increased their size (there aren't as many SEALs as Rangers). Since SEALs usually operate in smaller numbers than Rangers, they weren't used to having larger numbers like this. Also the beach they came up on had some guys (or one guy) with a big machine gun and night vision. They could very clearly see the SEALs come out of the water. Thus they opened fire and mowed down the numerical equivalent of a couple SEAL Teams. The SEALs had not been given proper intelligence, they had not been given the proper equipment, and they were not doing the type of mission they were trained to do.

It was the NAVY that messed up, not the SEALs.

Other great Spec Ops teams around the world are the famous British SAS and SBS, the Australian SAS, the British Royal Marine Commandos etc...South Korea has SOF teams too, even Brazil, and they are all highly-trained. And contrary to the belief of some, no, SAS do not train the U.S. Army SF, they all cross-train. SF teaches the SAS stuff, the SAS teaches SF stuff. When you look at the resumes of many high-ranking SF soldiers, it will mention things like "British Commando Course," British this or that, etc...and the Australian and British soldiers have training at U.S. Schools too. You will actually find this with the regular Army as well. My Drill Sergeant when I went through Infantry training had a German marksmanship badge from training with the German Army. At Airborne School, I saw soldiers from all the branches of the military (Air Force PJs, Navy SEAL BUD/s graduates, Rangers, SF soldiers, etc....one time I walked into the Subway there and the place was chock full of solely SF and Ranger guys), soldiers from Middle Eastern countries, one of the instructors was even an Australian Army guy. The SF soldiers were there mainly because of all the 18X (Special Forces contracts) guys that were going to be going through the Special Forces Assessment & Selection Prep Course after Airborne School.

Now many argue about which are the best in the world. If you mean which team is the best in the world, there ain't none, because there are TOO MANY DIFFERENT SKILLS to master to be the best!! Unless you are superman or something. If you mean which country's are the best, again, you can't really say. I am sure that, in general, any SF soldier and any SEAL and PJ and SAS and SBS and Royal Marine commando/soldier all are pretty much on the same level of mental toughness and physical fitness and shooting skills. They are all experts in land navigation, survival, etc...but some know it better than others. They have their own respective skills that they use in Spec Ops.

If you mean which country has the most capable Spec Ops, that would be the United States. The United States Special Operations Forces have the most funding, the most modern equipment, the most wide amount of capabilities, and to help them they have the best aircraft, the most capable Navy, the most capable Air Force, the GPS system which many other countries don't have, etc...also it is the fact that the U.S. itself has so much to offer. Many countries don't have the funding to have lots of different Spec Ops forces, but even if they did, they don't have the terrain to train them. The U.S. has jungle, mountains, desert, frigid cold (Alaska), etc....all right at home here in the good 'ole USA, and all that is very helpful for the training of the soldiers. Army Mountain Warfare School is on the East Coast. Marine Corps Mountain Warfare School is on the West Coast.



posted on Mar, 1 2006 @ 05:01 PM
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Let's break it down (for the sake of argument, you understand!)...


Originally posted by WheelsRCool
The United States Special Operations Forces have the most funding, the most modern equipment,


With all that funding, I would certainly hope so.


the most wide amount of capabilities, and to help them they have the best aircraft, the most capable Navy, the most capable Air Force,


Very debatable. On the navy side of things, well, not too much I can argue there, although RN are pretty good.

But USAF, the most capable? These are the guys that fly into cable cars, blow up Warriors full of Fusiliers, bomb Canadian troopers and hit BBC convoys travelling with Special Forces teams in northern Iraq...If that's the most capable support available in the world...


the GPS system which many other countries don't have


Any, off-the-shelf marine unit should be just fine, shouldn't it? What's so bad about having a Garmin in your hand that makes the US-used GPS so superior? In VN the VC would pace out mortar attacks and be wonderfully accurate.


also it is the fact that the U.S. itself has so much to offer. Many countries don't have the funding to have lots of different Spec Ops forces,


Right, they make do with a single force, like we do, which is just as, if not more, effective. I'm told the nickname worldwide for 22ASAS is Special Forces Unimited.


they don't have the terrain to train them.


Refer to previous post.


The U.S. has jungle


Oh, what the hell. Kakadu, Cape York, Gulf of Carpentaria (tick)


mountains
Great Dividing Range, extends almost the length of our east coast (tick)

desert
Hmm, Simpson, Tanami, Great Sandy, Western, Gibber. Say, have you looked at a terrain map of Australia lately? (tick)

frigid cold (Alaska)
Okay, we don't have perma-frost, but we do get snow and the Commandoes and SAS have to train there in winter. I supose we could spend the money sending them to our other continent (Antarctica), but that's a bit extreme on the budgetary side of things (so, tick)

....all right at home here in the good 'ole USA, and all that is very helpful for the training of the soldiers. Army Mountain Warfare School is on the East Coast. Marine Corps Mountain Warfare School is on the West Coast.
I'd point out that the Royal Marine Commando Arctic and Mountain Warfare Cadre do (and did) their training in northern Norway, exactly where they would have been deployed to fight the Soviets and their weapons (Accuracy International L96) were designed specifically for this extreme cold.



posted on Mar, 1 2006 @ 05:18 PM
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Originally posted by HowlrunnerIV
But USAF, the most capable? These are the guys that fly into cable cars, blow up Warriors full of Fusiliers, bomb Canadian troopers and hit BBC convoys travelling with Special Forces teams in northern Iraq...If that's the most capable support available in the world...


Gee what an informed comment. If the RAF had an airforce and sortie rate teh size of the US, you can be damn sure they'd be more than a few blue on blue's.
THey are the most capable air support in the world, simple as that.

BTW, who is the 22ASAS ?



posted on Mar, 1 2006 @ 05:24 PM
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I would have to go with British SAS and Aussie SAS from what i have read about them and from what family members who have been in armed forces.
Cant offer an opinion on US special forces as i have no direct info regarding their capabilities.

BTW my uncle , who is now deceased fought along side the Ghurkas, he was a tough man, he told my father they were the scariest little B#@%*#$ds hed ever seen. And in the same breath said you wouldnt want any one else along side you in a S%*t storm.



posted on Mar, 1 2006 @ 05:34 PM
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not sure on 22asas but 22 SAS are the British regular SAS regiment 21 and 23 SAS are territorial Regiments.

[edit on 1-3-2006 by buckaroo]



posted on Mar, 1 2006 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by rogue1
BTW, who is the 22ASAS ?


I'm assuming you know exactly who I mean.

but for anybody else, try this:

22NZSAS, 22ASAS

Getting the picture? It's a way of differentiating the numerous 22nd Special Air Service regiments in the world.

Just like RM, RNM, or RAF, RAAF, RNZAF, (what was once RCAF), RSAF, RN, RAN, RNZN, RCN, etc.

Royal Marines, Royal Netherlands Marines, Royal Air Force, Royal Australian Air Force, Royal New Zealand Air Force (Royal Canadian Air Force), Royal Swedish Air Force (Royal sSouth African Air Force), Royal Navy, Royal Australian Navy, Royal New Zealand Navy, Royal Canadian Navy...

As for the USAF, results count...



posted on Mar, 1 2006 @ 05:59 PM
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Originally posted by HowlrunnerIV

Originally posted by rogue1
BTW, who is the 22ASAS ?


I'm assuming you know exactly who I mean.

but for anybody else, try this:

22NZSAS, 22ASAS

Getting the picture? It's a way of differentiating the numerous 22nd Special Air Service regiments in the world.


LMAO, for a person who seems to think he knows it all, you're way off base. There is only one 22SAS which are of course the Brits.
The Australians aree known as the SASR - Special Air Service Regiment


Erm, getting the picture




[edit on 1-3-2006 by rogue1]



posted on Mar, 1 2006 @ 06:11 PM
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I agree Howlrunner might know better being an Australian ,

But im sure that The Australian SAS only have one regiment with 3 sabre squadrons,4 troops to a squadron and Id imagine a head quaters squadron and a signal squadron might be wrong.

*does the Australian SAS CRW wing(or equivolent) split in to Red (air and mountain troop) And Blue (boat and mobility troop) troop like 22 SAS? and if im right on there only being 3 sabre squadrons what are the rotational durations like ,any one know? just out of curiosity.Btw it seems that a Sabre squadron in 22 SAS will spend between 6-9 months on CRW deployment.

[edit on 1-3-2006 by buckaroo]

[edit on 1-3-2006 by buckaroo]



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