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ISPs Cooperate With P2P Companies to Make File Transfers More Efficient

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posted on Dec, 31 2007 @ 11:28 PM
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Found this on Wired:

Researchers at Yale University have devised a way for ISPs to reduce the amount of bandwidth consumed by P2P traffic by 60 percent, if lab results translate to the real world. But rather than throttling back on transfers during peak hours or blocking certain types of traffic, the system actually increases P2P transfers by 30 percent by matching peers who are located near each other.


This is good news! And definitely the way to go. Instead of fighting what is obviously the future, Verizon is embracing it and with the help of scientists, figuring out a way to make the system work.

If you can't beat 'em, join 'em


Note: P2P technology is not merely for downloading illegal or copyrighted content, although that is what the bulk of it is used for. P2P is also used for voice-over-IP and streaming media.

Click here for more information on P2P.

Related thread:
Heavy Internet users unplugged by US cable company




posted on Jan, 1 2008 @ 08:21 AM
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Originally posted by Beachcoma

Note: P2P technology is not merely for downloading illegal or copyrighted content, although that is what the bulk of it is used for. P2P is also used for voice-over-IP and streaming media.


Not to mention video game companies using it for patches to their games, or software companies who choose to use various p2p programs to distribute their software.

This is excellent news, and I hope more ISPs implement such tech in the future.



posted on Jan, 1 2008 @ 01:16 PM
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Sounds good!

As has been said, P2P has many legitimate uses as well, so this should help enormously.

Beachcoma, I'm not that clued up on how this would work, as it sounds like a software/IP routing thing. I'm more of a core network/layer 1 person. But it just sounds like common sense evolution of a technology with alot of promise.



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