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Airline security screening problems

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posted on Feb, 9 2004 @ 02:48 AM
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Passenger screening for airline flights is inarguably more thorough that it was prior to the 9/11 hijackings, but I have personally observed a serious oversight. I travel in a manual wheelchair. It has a frame of hollow aluminum tubing a seat of a squishy gel material. On four of my last five flights the screeners gave the chair only the most casual inspection. The one place it was rigorously inspected was in Vancouver. There they visually inspected the frame, checked the gel seat and swabbed it for chemical residue. (Iím surprised I passed that test because I shoot handguns quite often so that chair is bound to have gunpowder residue one it.) The other security agents helped me stand up, patted me down, used a metal detector on my person and sent me on my merry way.

The two times I pointed out the possible oversight to security officers they were really indignant. Like ĒWho are you to question our procedures?Ē I feel like I should make an official complaint but Iím unsure who to send it to, and Iím afraid if I do Iíll get on some federal list of troublemakers. What the heck, I probably am anyway since I hang out around the local air base taking pictures of the military aircraft. And Iím an ATS member to boot!




posted on Feb, 9 2004 @ 03:06 AM
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Yeah sometimes they seem to do things alittle funny. I mean on my way back to Ft.polk from Atlanta right before deploying they almost stripped me down to nothing just because I had on DCUs and I had a flight bag as my carry on. Kinda annoying. I don't wanna sound like a jackass, but i'm the only one who got it out of everyone on the flight. Then they kept testing my military ID, like it was fake or somthing. I know some one could have impersonated a military official and all, but I would think that would draw too much attention to them. Oh well.



posted on Feb, 9 2004 @ 03:35 AM
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Good, I'm pleased that I'm not the only one who sort of sees it that way.
Don't get me wrong; I'm all about increased security to protect the passengers and crew. It is just that we have to get to the airport earlier, wait in line to go through the searches and scanners, adhere to the new policies on banned items, etc. -then they let my seat, which could have been 5 pounds of explosive, go through unchecked right into the belly of the plane. Makes it all seem like a nearly pointless exercise, perhaps to make people FEEL more secure.



posted on Feb, 9 2004 @ 07:49 AM
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When British security officers went to the US, they were appalled by the lax level of security. This was after the Sept 11th attacks as well. It will be no surprise to me when another attack comes from inside the US rather than from an international flight.



posted on Feb, 9 2004 @ 08:00 AM
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yeah, unfortunatly, it won't surprise me either.



posted on Jul, 16 2004 @ 12:15 PM
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I hope this topic's a suitable place to post this information.

I'd never heard of "computer assisted passenger pre-screening program system" until I found this article at Wired.com




The government's controversial plan to screen passengers before they board a plane is dead -- but it may return in a new form with a new name. The $100 million CAPPS II program, started after the terrorist attacks of 2001, has never been deployed or field-tested, but would have used commercial databases, intelligence information, a centralized terrorist watch list and a list of outstanding warrants to keep terrorists and violent criminals from boarding commercial flights. Airlines have been reluctant to share passenger data for final testing, following a string of revelations about major carriers secretly providing millions of passenger itineraries to help in the development of screening algorithms



This seemed like such a good idea to me, and a lot of money has gone into its development. However, the idea has come under fire from privacy groups, and I wondered if their objections were justified. Still, it seems that various members of Congress were not happy with it either.

Perhaps the money already spent won't be totally a waste, seeing as the system is about to be re-born. And hopefully, this will do much to improve US airline security with regard to terrorists.

www.wired.com...



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