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Japan removes humpback whales from Antarctic hunt

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posted on Dec, 22 2007 @ 02:56 PM
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Originally posted by Havalon
Thank you for your input and the link Vox. Always good to hear both sides of the story.

This especially:

The end game to all of this - and indeed the endgame to the treaty that Australia, NZ and all of the other anti-whaling nations have signed which imposed the current moratorium on whaling - is to determine when the populations of minke and other whale species have recovered to a point where the moratorium on commercial whaling can be lifted, and commercial whaling can resume with proper management of stocks.


I am still concerned about the sheer numbers involved (1000) - that is way too much purely for research, in my humble opinion. That is depleating the stocks they are trying to count!

H


The numbers were the biggest concern for me when I started looking into all of this a few years back. With the disagreements on total population for the minke whale population (which is the vast majority of the targeted whales) in the southern ocean taken into account, the minimum agreed on number is a low of roughly 300,000 and a max of roughly 750,000 in the southern ocean.

Even with the Humpback whales, at the root of this thread - the proposal called for a catch of 50 from a Southern Hemisphere population of approx 40-50,000 (depending on the source). That`s just enough to gain the most basic information about the health of the species - and just barely statistically relevant at that.




posted on Dec, 22 2007 @ 03:22 PM
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Originally posted by Havalon

[snip]



(Sorry, if I`d quoted all that I`d have been tagged by a mod for sure. )

I`m not sure if I see where all that was going.

On one hand, we have a non-profit, privately owned (not unusual under Japanese law and company organization) conducting research under the IWC, which is at the root an industry organization - like many other research facilities in every sector of the economy.

They are given subsidies by the Japanese government in the same way that fishermen in Canada are subsidized because there`s no more cod, and in the same way that research groups dealing with the cod stocks are given funding.

The meat needs to be sold to generate revenue for the research. Thus it goes to a large distributor who processes it and sells it. That`s known - and it`s a long standing point in the argument.

I just don`t see what`s so shocking about it. We already know that the meat is sold. I do, anyway - I see it for sale quite a bit. Never seen it canned though, but then I never buy canned goods. No one is denying that the aim is to resume commercial whaling at sustainable levels. No one here is claiming that the remains of the industry are not being kept alive by the government on one hand and sales of the meat on the other. In fact, just the opposite is true: the government, industry partners and ICR are quite transparent in their operations and goals.

It`s a fairly common point to make though - but at the end of the day it just amounts to obfuscation, in my opinion.



posted on Dec, 22 2007 @ 03:22 PM
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reply to post by vox2442
 


Has the Institute any figures on the the natural attrition rate of the whales per annum, caused by beaching/stranding, illness, old age etc?

Perhaps the Institute should should look at just recovering the 'already dead' ones! More information (as to the cause of death etc) could be gleaned from these. (okay! so it would'nt be fresh meat going to the cannery, but it is just supposed to be research anyway, is'nt it?.)
H




posted on Dec, 22 2007 @ 03:37 PM
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Originally posted by Havalon
reply to post by vox2442
 


Has the Institute any figures on the the natural attrition rate of the whales per annum, caused by beaching/stranding, illness, old age etc?


I seem to recall reading a paper from them a while ago dealing with mortality rates, but it`s not in my bookmarks, and it`s not in my filing cabinet, so ... yeah. You could e-mail them, if you`re really interested. They`re decent enough with information requests, as long as you ask nicely (like anywhere else).



Perhaps the Institute should should look at just recovering the 'already dead' ones! More information (as to the cause of death etc) could be gleaned from these. (okay! so it would'nt be fresh meat going to the cannery, but it is just supposed to be research anyway, is'nt it?.)
H


The problem with that approach is that aside from beachings, dead whales tend not to last very long in the oceans. Sharks and whatnot tend to take care of them pretty quickly - if they`re not the cause of death, they come around fairly soon after.


[edit on 22-12-2007 by vox2442]



posted on Dec, 22 2007 @ 03:52 PM
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reply to post by vox2442
 


Where I suppose I am going with this?, it is the fact that the Japanese government is stating that the culling of the whales is purely for scientific research.
The US$60 million of whale products is used to fund this research.

I am of the opinion that the US$60 million is the main reason for the cull and the research is secondary. (yeah! I could be wrong, it is just an opinion after all!)

The Southern Ocean is supposed to be a sanctuary for the whale population. Going into that sanctuary and capturing/killing the whale flies in the face of international law and opinion. The sanctuary was set up for a reason.

Thank you for your polite an knowledgeable input Vox, in what is generally a contentious subject.
I will ask them (nicely!) for the information they have on mortality rates.



posted on Dec, 24 2007 @ 08:04 AM
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i find it totally disgusting the way they kill like they do about time someone got old enola gay out again.



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