U.S. Court Bars Burial of Mystery Ancient Skeleton

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posted on Feb, 8 2004 @ 09:54 PM
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What's more important, modern science or Native American tradition?
Apperantly, modern science.



U.S. Court Bars Burial of Mystery Ancient Skeleton
Wed 4 February, 2004 23:20

By Adam Tanner

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Denying a request by American Indian tribes who sought an immediate burial, a U.S. appeals court ruled on Wednesday that scientists should be allowed to continue testing on a 9,000 year-old skeleton.

The legal battle dates back to 1996, after two teenagers discovered a skeleton near of the shore of the Columbia River near Kennewick, Washington.

Scientists dated the "Kennewick Man" remains as 8,340 to 9,200 years old, yet it was a puzzling find because its features different from those of American Indians. Scientists hoped further study would shed light on early North Americans.

Indian tribes demanded the burial of the remains which they believe belong to a distant relative, but the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals denied that request, backing a lower court ruling.


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posted on Feb, 8 2004 @ 10:01 PM
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"A distant relative"? The guy is nine THOUSAND years dead. Let the world learn something from him instead of having him just rot in the ground.



posted on Feb, 8 2004 @ 10:04 PM
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Ditto, his bones missed a good chance to rot already



posted on Feb, 10 2004 @ 04:13 PM
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I think science needs more time with skeleton. If I rember correctly,it may not even be native american. I know at some point there was a lot of discussion about that point.
When all the studies on the skeleton are done,then go ahead and bury him.



posted on Feb, 13 2004 @ 01:24 PM
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It seems to me that a skeleton that old has passed out of "respect for the dead" and into "part of palientology." At 9000 years old, he/she could be any one of our ancestors (well, almost).



posted on Feb, 13 2004 @ 01:52 PM
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It's politically hot - the bones don't appear to be Native American. If people were here before the Native Americans, they lose their "I was here first and the white man took away my land" card.

So they don't want ANY tests on this guy, but the scientific community obviously would like to determine the truth.

Of course, this was all covered in ATS before (like most good topics!):
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Feb, 15 2004 @ 04:14 PM
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Good point...hehe...but I doubt they'd lose that card...

They were still here BEFORE us, and WE were the ones who instigated near genocide to settle here...so yeah, the government is still obligated there....regardless of what is found....



posted on Feb, 15 2004 @ 05:23 PM
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Near genocide? And the Jews in Germany were unwelcomed. Talk about understatement.

I seriously doubt they don't want the US to uncover something that says some other race was here before them because they would lose their "leverage". Westerners think that way Natives don't. And what, do tell, has the 'card' gotten them?

Of course you guys feel that it is important for science to keep the remains and I agree. However if you know anything about Native American culture then you know that it is sacred to them to bury their dead. So it might be a "so what's the big deal?" to you, but to them it is part of their spiritual beliefs.


[Edited on 15-2-2004 by Aliceinwonderland]

[Edited on 15-2-2004 by Aliceinwonderland]

[Edited on 15-2-2004 by Aliceinwonderland]



posted on Feb, 15 2004 @ 06:05 PM
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if it doesn't appear to be of native american background, then which nationality does it best compare too?



posted on Feb, 15 2004 @ 07:50 PM
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Originally posted by IKnowNothing
if it doesn't appear to be of native american background, then which nationality does it best compare too?


I wonder ?






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