It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Active glacier found on Mars

page: 1
5

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 19 2007 @ 11:07 AM
link   

Active glacier found on Mars


news.bbc.co.uk

A probable active glacier has been identified for the first time on Mars.

The icy feature has been spotted in images from the European Space Agency's (Esa) Mars Express spacecraft.

Ancient glaciers, many millions of years old, have been seen before on the Red Planet, but these ones may only be several thousand years old.

The young glacier appears in the Deuteronilus Mensae region between Mars' rugged southern highlands and the flat northern lowlands.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Dec, 19 2007 @ 11:07 AM
link   
There is some dispute whether the glaciation is caused by subsurface water or actual snowfall, but nonetheless it is further evidence, from ESA, not NASA, that Mars is far from the dead planet we are led to believe it is.

Of course, with so much water, even frozen, microbal life is not far behind.

news.bbc.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Dec, 19 2007 @ 04:00 PM
link   
That's great news! I wonder, why hasn't NASA seen this yet? With all the imaging, you'd think they'd have caught something like this already.



posted on Dec, 19 2007 @ 04:03 PM
link   
reply to post by Mekanic
 


they probably did but well they didnt care much about sharing it with the rest of the people , heh what a shoocker ..



posted on Dec, 19 2007 @ 04:34 PM
link   

Originally posted by Thill
reply to post by Mekanic
 


they probably did but well they didnt care much about sharing it with the rest of the people , heh what a shoocker ..

What?
---------------------------------------

Please read ABOUT ATS: Warnings for one-line or short responses

www.abovetopsecret.com...

[edit on 20/12/07 by masqua]



posted on Dec, 19 2007 @ 04:35 PM
link   
i was under the impression that the ice caps at the martian poles were CO2? if thats the case what guarantees that this glacier is water?



posted on Dec, 20 2007 @ 02:31 AM
link   
reply to post by Damocles
 


ESA is planning to do a fly-over in the coming months to confirm that it is indeed ice, but why do you think it would be frozen CO2? You're talking pretty darn cold there...and the rovers have trundled across martian mud puddles so water is logical. Carbon dioxide glaciers, pretty interesting idea nonetheless...



posted on Dec, 20 2007 @ 02:41 AM
link   
reply to post by gottago
 


i just seem to recall grade school science class learning that the "ice" on the poles of mars was frozen CO2.

i missed the bit about the rovers going muddin though



posted on Dec, 20 2007 @ 03:27 AM
link   
reply to post by Damocles
 


That's pretty much the old grade-school version of Mars that we're seeing fall by the wayside. With the latest generation of probes, we've learned Mars has blue skies during the day, glaciers, mudpuddles, and what sure do look like streams and lakes--but they haven't publicly confirmed those images yet. You even had NASA announcing a few years back that a rock sample showed probable signs of fossilized microbal life. Really quite fascinating.

Hook all this up with the electric/plasma universe theory, which posits that a planet's distance from the sun is not as important as once believed in warming the planet, and it becomes really interesting.



posted on Dec, 20 2007 @ 07:28 AM
link   
I am really disappointed, but not at all surprised at how this story has been just so routinely ignored by the main scream media. Even alter-news sites like Coast to Coast and Rense have failed to give this notable event a nod. The first place I saw it yesterday was at the main BBC website.

I must admit, however, that in the case of Coast to Coast, there’s nothing left to resemble what Art Bell began years ago. Today, it’s become just another grog & noodle kitchen for the dissemination of mostly boring subject matter… completely in line with the official media menu doctrine.

Back to Mars...

The implications are greater than are being publicly noted because Mars simply doesn’t have the depth of weather patterns to deposit enough snow/ice from precipitation to account for this feature. The glacier, and there is little doubt that is just what it is, needs a fairly constant supply of water for it to be a ‘glacier’. It therefore becomes nearly undeniable that this water is coming from underground. This suggests that liquid water does exist in far vaster quantities than anyone in any official capacity wants to admit.

Follow the water?

Personally, I’ve seen enough fossilized evidence just from the Mars Rovers to believe that NASA, the ESA and the mainstream scientific community are either stoned senseless or… choking on what is NOT being said.

It’s business as usual though... there is water and a duck that is being called anything but what it is.

...



posted on Dec, 20 2007 @ 08:30 AM
link   

Originally posted by Johnmike

Originally posted by Thill
reply to post by Mekanic
 


they probably did but well they didnt care much about sharing it with the rest of the people , heh what a shoocker ..

What?


Thill is from Poland, and I would guess that’s why his English is a little fuzzy.

How’s your Polish?



posted on Dec, 20 2007 @ 09:03 AM
link   
Great find gottago!

Flagged and starred.

Can't wait to see what the next Mars missions find out about this area!




posted on Dec, 20 2007 @ 12:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by Silcone Synapse
Great find gottago!

Flagged and starred.

Can't wait to see what the next Mars missions find out about this area!



Thanks, makes me recall that the ESA named the mission the Mars Express--this almost also assumes there's going to be a local... ;-)



posted on Dec, 20 2007 @ 01:14 PM
link   

Originally posted by gottago
reply to post by Damocles
...but why do you think it would be frozen CO2? You're talking pretty darn cold there...and the rovers have trundled across martian mud puddles so water is logical. Carbon dioxide glaciers, pretty interesting idea nonetheless...


Frozen CO2 isn't all that cold on earth, around -78C. I don't know what the sublimation point would be under Martian atmosheric pressures - a little lower, but not enough to mean that the climate of Mars would not accomodate it:


Differing values have been reported for the average temperature on Mars, with a common value being −55 °C. Surface temperatures have been estimated from the Viking Orbiter Infrared Thermal Mapper data; this gives extremes from a warmest of 27 °C to −143 °C at the winter polar caps. Actual temperature measurements from the Viking landers range from −17.2 °C to −107 °C.



Mars possesses ice caps at both poles, which mainly consist of water ice; however, there is dry ice present on their surfaces. Frozen carbon dioxide (dry ice) accumulates in the northern polar region (Planum Boreum) in winter only, melting completely in summer, while the south polar region additionally has a permanent dry ice cover up to eight metres (25 feet) thick. This difference is due to the higher elevation of the south pole.


(from en.wikipedia.org...)

Cheers.

Rob.



posted on Dec, 20 2007 @ 05:24 PM
link   

Originally posted by Jibbs
Thill is from Poland, and I would guess that’s why his English is a little fuzzy.

How’s your Polish?


Terrible. Why?



new topics

top topics



 
5

log in

join