It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Tiny transistor found to be fraud and has fooled many eminent experts.

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 7 2004 @ 07:33 PM
link   
Hendrik Schoen creator of the alleged smallest organic transistor ever made, has been abandoned by his peers.

The transistor was supposed to be only a single molicule in length, and was far smaller than anything possible on a silicon chip, so it seemed to herald a new age when computer power could grow to undreamed of levels.

After much frustration many other scientists have been unable to recreate the experiment and the data collated seems not to be correct.


Link

Do you think that this technology will be possible one day? or is this just SciFi?

[Edited on 8-2-2004 by DJDOHBOY]




posted on Feb, 7 2004 @ 08:36 PM
link   
oh, damn!! that sucks

if he is realy found to be a froud i hope hes living on the street



posted on Feb, 8 2004 @ 09:00 PM
link   
Isn't it correct to assume this scientist is doomed to suffer a fait like Tessla whether he did or did not create that transistor? Could it be that we are witnessing a perfect example hiding the truth? For who would benefit most on such technology, think about it. Nano computers with super computer power? They could put nano size computers or robots into flower to make every bread eating dude in the world to have their brains overridden with the switch of a button.......

Blessings,
Mikromarius



posted on Feb, 8 2004 @ 09:15 PM
link   
It's strange that he would risk his 'reputation' by deliberately misleading others. Here's more from the article.



It was the latest in a long line of great discoveries made by Schoen. He was only in his early 30s and yet had already made advances in the world of superconductors and lasers.

His name had become so prominent in the scientific journals that to many of his rivals he had taken on legendary status.

Professor Jeremy Baumberg, from Southampton University, UK, told Horizon: "This was the new level of science that you had to match yourself up against, and everybody knew they couldn't, they couldn't meet that.

"It was like competing against a god really." But his transistor work had surpassed everything he had done before.



new topics

top topics
 
0

log in

join