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US grounds P3-C on structural failure risk

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posted on Dec, 17 2007 @ 01:10 PM
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www.flightglobal.com...


The US Navy has grounded 39 of its 161 Lockheed P-3C Orion maritime-patrol aircraft because of structural fatigue concerns. Ten of the aircraft deployed operationally are included among those grounded.

Affected aircraft "are beyond known structural limits on the lower section of the P-3", says Naval Air Systems Command, adding this is the third time since 2005 that the US Navy has grounded part of its Orion fleet because of structural concerns.



first we had the F15 A-D`s being ground for structural failure and now these are on the ground - it must begger - what IS safe to fly?




posted on Dec, 17 2007 @ 01:33 PM
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Affected aircraft "are beyond known structural limits on the lower section of the P-3", says Naval Air Systems Command, adding this is the third time since 2005 that the US Navy has grounded part of its Orion fleet because of structural concerns.


Thats the key part right there. Canada has had to do the same thing with their fleet before


The CF’s 18 CP-140 Aurora maritime patrol aircraft were first delivered in 1980/’81. The Aurora Incremental Modernization Project (AIMP), which began in 1998, was to transform these aging aircraft into “multi-mission platforms” capable of over- land surveillance as well. Three-quarters of the way into this $1.6B project, structural problems were uncovered.



posted on Dec, 17 2007 @ 02:10 PM
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Bad timing for the Royal New Zealand Air Force, we've got 5 (or is it 6) of them.

It's leading up to the summer sailing season in the Pacific and these aircraft get quite a hammering looking for lost sailors, canoeists, fishermen, and general flotsan and getsom.

That means the slack will have to be taken up by our ageing C-130's.

No.5 Squadron is in Whenuapai, Auckland, so I guess we'll know pretty soon.



posted on Dec, 17 2007 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by Mr Gunter
 


Honestly each P-3 is to its own. These planes have had so many replacement parts from boneyards and shuch you could divide the P-3s into 46 groups on parts and airframes. Other operators may be fine.



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