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The "Fayette Factor"

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posted on Dec, 17 2007 @ 11:11 AM
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The Marquis de la Lafayette, Freemason at age seventeen, revolutionary at nineteen.


Born into an ancient family of French warriors, the Marquis de Lafayette inherited an inclination for gallant adventures along with a vast estate. When the time came to prove his mettle, it was not at the service of France, but the rebellious American colony improvising a new government an ocean away. Just 19 years old and speaking only a few words of English when he presented himself in Philadelphia in 1776, his inauspicious entry into American history belied the monumental effect of his passion, instinctive skill, and connections.
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An article written by renowned Fortean, Jim Brandon (AKA William Grimstad) in Fortean Times (No. 25, Spring 1978) has fascinated me for some time. The article centred on the places in the United States where Lafayette had donated his namesake or had consecrated certain Masonic Temples.

Unfortunately this particular issue of FT has been lost to me for some time. Below is an article by Cryptozoologist Loren Coleman;


The cities, towns, and counties across the United States, which are the Fortean hotspots linked to the Fayette Factor, are tied to the renamed Masonic lodges and affiliated sites that the Marquis de Lafayette visited on his grand tour of the country in 1824-1825. His visits were highly ritualized happenings, in which he is involved with laying many cornerstones. The locations where he is taken to visit are a virtual roadmap of the "special places" in this land. For example, in 1825, The Marquis de Lafayette, on board the ship (please note!) "Enterprise," visited the Cahokia mounds, and the significant Bloody Island, which then was so large that half of the Mississippi flowed east of it. (Intriguingly, Lafayette returned to France in 1825, on the day after his birthday, demonstrating a keen eye on the calendar and a desire to celebrate September 6th in America.)

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That Lafayette came from a noble family of an ancient warrior bloodline seems to have resonance with the belief in "Names of Power" in Ritual Magic.


According to the ancient science of numerology, this is due to the hidden vibrational influence emanating from every name.
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The subject of the vibration of Names of Power is discussed at length in other sources. The Names should be pronounced inwardly in the breath, vibrating it as much as possible and feeling that the whole body throbs with the sound and sends out a wave of vibration directed to the ends of the Earth, according to Regardie.
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The Marquis lent his name to a large number of counties, towns, streets, and other public places across the United States. These places seem to more than their fair share of strange occurrences.

Eighteen counties and twenty-eight towns and cities across the USA bear some derivitive of the name Lafayette.

Could we speculate that the reverberation of the root-word in the Marquis' name (Fayette) may play a "triggering" role in the bizarre phenomena that centres around these places.

Lafayettes personal involvement with the science of "magnetism" as discovered by fellow Freemason Franz Anton Mesmer leads one to further wonder if Lafayette was simply an unwitting vehicle for the power of his family name or if the dispensation of his name around the country was of a more deliberate nature.


It is in New England where the town of Fayette first came to attention in 1759, when Elder Paul Coffin noted in his diary that,

"There is Magic and Witchcraft in Fayette."
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Fayette in Maine, on State Road 133, is near Jolly Hollow Spring, home of the "Moving Arm Ghost."
Legend has it that this apparition rises from Jolly Hollow Spring with a copper dipper for thirsty travellers.

Of course the Marquis was but two-years-old when Coffin made this note. The naming antecedent would be interesting to find out.

Let us move on to Arkansas. In the North-west corner of the state, Fayetteville. A place of no shortage of odd occurrences.


The saga of the White River Monster (or 'Whitey' as it was popularly known) begins in the summer of 1937, just to the south of Newport, Arkansas. In that spot, the White River, a tributary to the great Mississippi, is particularly deep. In September of that year, local farmer Bramlett Bateman signed an affidavit describing a sighting he had made sometime around July 1.
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White River Bridge lies ten miles west of Fayetteville.

Fayetteville is also a UFO 'hotspot", or as John Keel calls it, "a window area."

UFOmaps: Fayetteville


In the Southwest corner of Arkansas lies what is considered a Sasquatch "Hotspot." Around the town of Fouke in Miller County and ranging eastward into Lafayette County. These creatures have been sighted around these parts since 1856. The legends and sightings from this area were dramatised in the film, "The Legend of Boggy Creek."


(to be continued...)










[edit on 17/12/2007 by Beelzebubba]




posted on Dec, 18 2007 @ 12:13 AM
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(cont...)
One of the more recent sightings;

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Texas Bigfoot Centre

The next point of interest lies with the renowned hoax, the Cardiff Giant.



This "discovery" caused a sensation across the Nation in 1859. Professor James Brator of the New York State Museum declared it a "genuine ancient sculpture, but not a fossil.

Hoaxster, George Hull stepped forward and admitted his guilt. He then went on into detail of his elaborate plan to fool those gullible enough to believe that "There were Giants in the Earth in those days."


The Giant was the creation of a New York tobacconist named George Hull. Hull, an atheist, decided to create the giant after an argument with a fundamentalist minister named Mr. Turk about a passage in Genesis that stated that there were giants who once lived on earth.[1]

The idea of the petrified man did not originate with Hull, however. In 1858 the newspaper Alta California had published a bogus letter that claimed that a prospector had been petrified when he had drunk a liquid within a geode. Some other newspapers had also published stories of supposedly petrified people.

Hull hired men to carve out a 10-feet-long, 4.5 inches block of gypsum in Fort Dodge, Iowa, telling them it was intended for a monument of Abraham Lincoln in New York. He shipped the block to Chicago, where he hired a German stonecutter to carve it into the likeness of a man and swore him to secrecy. Various stains and acids were used to make the giant appear to be old and weather beaten, and the giant's surface was beaten with steel knitting needles embedded in a board to simulate pores. Then Hull transported the giant by rail to the farm of William Newell, his cousin, in November 1868. He had by then spent $2,600 on the hoax.

When the giant had been buried for a year, Newell hired two men, Gideon Emmons and Henry Nichols, ostensibly to dig a well. When they found the Giant, one of them has been attributed to saying "I declare, some old Indian has been buried here!".
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The American Goliah

Cardiff Farm was situated in the town of La Fayette.

It is interesting to note that around the towns of La Fayette and Fayetteville many legitimate instances of petrification of animal and even human remains have been reported.

In the city of Fayetteville in North Carolina is the infamous Slocumb Mansion.


"Did I ever mention Dr. John Allen McLean's story to you—his seeing a ghost in the old Slocumb home in Fayetteville?" she began.
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Besides the spectral inhabitants of this mansion, there are other curious ties. The vault that is said to exist in the basement and the tunnel leading to the Cape Fear River. Rumours persist concerning the mysterious " Bank of the United States" (hence the vault), fodder for many a conspiracist.

The Marquis was known to have visited this mansion numerous times.

Bank of the United States
Andrew Jackson vs. Bank of the United States

Cape Fear River has been the home of quite a few hairy hominid sightings over the years.

(to be continued...)




[edit on 18/12/2007 by Beelzebubba]



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