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In China They Farm Fish in Toxic Waters

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posted on Dec, 16 2007 @ 07:58 AM
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In China They Farm Fish in Toxic Waters


www.nytimes.com

FUQING, China — Here in southern China, beneath the looming mountains of Fujian Province, lie dozens of enormous ponds filled with murky brown water and teeming with eels, shrimp and tilapia, much of it destined for markets in Japan and the West.

Fuqing is one of the centers of a booming industry that over two decades has transformed this country into the biggest producer and exporter of seafood in the world, and the fastest-growing supplier to the United States.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Dec, 16 2007 @ 07:58 AM
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When you have once seen the greyish non-transparentness they call water in ponds where hydrogenized and chloridized components make it into new stuff, together with the millions of fish produced in it, and on the surface of the murky water you see nothing but thousands of mouths of fish. Then you stop eat fish altogether.

The water is that murky, you cannot see more than an inch down, so you literally you only see their gasping for ozygen in a surface alive with thousands of mouths. And whiskers, catfish are most popular together with carps.

The problem is the complex chemical compounds the poor fish so-to-speak breath in the water, where decaying organic materials reacts with residues from medicin and additives from fodder besides what an enviroment getting industrializes at an unseen pace bringes along its waterways...

Well, a problem for fish, you might say and so it is, but the major problem is WE buy and consume most of that fish, riddled to a degree with hazards that controlls only can give hunch off.

Any fish, whatever sea-food from clams to prawns, canned or frozen, tempting with reasonable prices, could be another health hazarderous product from China.

www.nytimes.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Dec, 16 2007 @ 08:12 AM
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Well, ain't I lucky I don't like seafood?
I think one sentence accurately sums up all the problems China is experiencing: '“For 50 years,” said Wang Wu, a professor at Shanghai Fisheries University, “we’ve blindly emphasized economic growth."'
In something like 5 years, China has built the equivalent of the U.S. interstate highway system, among other un-publicised feats of engineering. But you get the feeling that they are going for quantity rather than quality, which is fair enough considering their population. But when you start exporting goods, then maybe it is a good idea to pay a bit more attention to what you are making - or breeding, as the case may be.


I find the description of the fish crowding the top inch of water to breath particularly repulsive.



posted on Dec, 16 2007 @ 08:13 AM
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Originally posted by khunmoon
Any fish, whatever sea-food from clams to prawns, canned or frozen, tempting with reasonable prices, could be another health hazarderous product from China.


Sorry, but it's not just from China.

Farm raising fish is a nasty enterprise no matter where it's done.



posted on Dec, 16 2007 @ 12:45 PM
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NASTY!!

For some time now, I've been personally boycotting anything from China that will go in my body.

It would appear corruption is rampant, and with very little concern for producing wholesome products, if I can determine a food product's origin to be China, back on the shelf it goes.

They may have provided a pronunciation key to the town's name in the article, FUQING, China, but that's not how I would pronounce it.

Thanks for the op, khunmoon, only confirmed what I suspected all along.



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