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North American Integration

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posted on Dec, 14 2007 @ 10:03 PM
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More North American Union stuff

Full info here
www.cfr.org...

The Future of North American Integration in the Wake of the Terrorist Attacks

October 17, 2001
Council on Foreign Relations

Atlanta, GA

The Atlanta Roundtable held its second session on October 17, 2001 to discuss the future of North American integration in the wake of the terrorist attacks. Gordon D. Giffin, Vice Chairman of Long, Aldridge & Norman and former U.S. Ambassador to Canada, and Robert A. Pastor, Professor of Political Science at Emory University, led the discussion.

The Atlanta Roundtable addressed the following questions:

1. What were the prospects of North American integration prior to September 11? What are they now?

2. What has been U.S. policy toward Canada and Mexico vis á vis trade? How has it changed since September 11? How should it change?

3. How will security concerns on the Canadian and Mexican borders affect trade policy going forward?

4. How has the United States’ response to the terrorist attacks (i.e. enforcing a security perimeter with Canada) affected our broader relations?

5. What are the costs and trade-offs of future U.S. actions to deal with the terrorist threat on our borders?

6. What can or should Canada and Mexico be doing to support the “war” on terrorism?




posted on Dec, 18 2007 @ 12:52 AM
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The prospects for North American integration

* Public opinion polls in the three countries have shown:

1. We like each other;

2. Our values are converging toward a North American model, not an American one; and

3. We are prepared to join a North American entity provided that it wouldn’t threaten the culture of each country and that the standard of living would increase.

* Despite what the polls say, several argued that Canadians do not want to be more integrated with the United States or be part of a North American union because they are concerned that the union would be dominated by the United States. Canada has spent its entire existence defining itself as what it’s not. Canadians fear that greater integration will homogenize or suppress their culture.



posted on Dec, 18 2007 @ 10:57 AM
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* Despite what the polls say, several argued that Canadians do not want to be more integrated with the United States or be part of a North American union because they are concerned that the union would be dominated by the United States. Canada has spent its entire existence defining itself as what it’s not. Canadians fear that greater integration will homogenize or suppress their culture.


I think this is the #1 pivotal matter here, there is no way in hell your everyday Canadian would accept such a 'Union'. For one the Canadians actually know what the definition of liberty is in comparison to most Americans. Their Government Fears the people, here in the US its the other way around. Im hoping that can change of course.

Its the Canadians that have the most to lose here.


[edit on 18-12-2007 by LwSiX]



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