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Atmosphere on moon

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posted on Dec, 9 2007 @ 03:00 PM
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So I was watch the Mars Rising series on one of the discovery HD channels and they were talking about being able to make Mars warm again. The current plan was to pump super green house gasses into the air to create the greenhouse effect. After that chemicals that were once froze would come up out of Mars and pressurize it. The air would be mostly carbon dioxide but you could be on the planet with no protection and only a oxygen tank/mask. The next step would be to put more oxygen into the air with plants.

Anyways I found that interesting and wondered if this could be done to the moon also, or does the moon not have enough gravity to hold an atmosphere? If it could work on the moon I am sure we will see work to make this happen shortly after we land back on the moon.


Thoughts?



sty

posted on Dec, 9 2007 @ 03:07 PM
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to do that on the moon would be a waste of energy as the gravity is not enough to retain consistent atmosphere , so we would loose it in several decades. About Mars- it could be a good idea , but i have the feeling something is just happening there and we are not under control - climate change .



posted on Dec, 9 2007 @ 05:04 PM
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Mars and the Moon are quite different in their composition. Mars has a lot of chemistry useful in creating a more hospitable atmosphere, it just needs to be chemically unbound from the rock and soil.

In addition to being "gravitationally challenged" the Moon lacks the chemistry to create those greenhouse gases.

Another interesting scenario credited to Robert Zubrin, is an accelerated program wherein rocket motors are strapped onto small and medium sized asteroids and slammed into Mars at high velocities. The kinetic impacts would release more of the chemistry into the atmosphere than even hundreds of nukes, and set up a greenhouse effect much quicker than "pollution factories" ever could.

Purely theoretical. But it would sure be more spectacular than watching smokestacks belch for a few hundred years or so.



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