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Monkey vs Man

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posted on Dec, 4 2007 @ 08:18 PM
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ABC Story says that our memory is not as good as a chimp...I was wondering if we were De-Evolving....Especially after the conversation I had last night.....Ever seen "Idiocracy" ? Wonder if others think the same?




posted on Dec, 4 2007 @ 09:09 PM
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This is clearly not a question of de-evolution. I was discussing this very news with my roommate yesterday, as he had come across an alternate coverage of the event. Someone had apparently speculated (and forgive the lack of links) that the (apparent) difference in memory efficiency -- so to speak -- might have something to do with human use of language. Upon further discussion, my friend and I concluded that while language allowed us to interact with a wider variety of objects, it allows us to store larger amounts of data in more abstract forms. For instance, the word "knife" conjures images of a "blade" (short, flat metal object that is sharpened on one side) and a correspondingly short "handle" (insert other description here). Another direct example is any wikipedia article; the definition paragraph is usually riddled with links to articles that explain several words in it.

A chimp can be taught to interact with a .44 caliber pistol. However, the chimp might not be able to associate the pistol with an AK47 rifle -- although we would, because we can associate both items under the title "gun". Other primates -- specifically, the ones referenced in the article -- may not have a need to interact with as much data as we do. As such, they can afford to efficiently store information or patterns, and win little tests like this.

Also, these were 5 year old chimps. It may be a matter of personal opinion that they are better at storing information, as they (currently) have less old data to interfere with new data. Compare to test subjects, who are college students -- obviously with a lot more on their mind, so to speak.

I conclude with a summary of my post; this research is not indicative of de-evolution, but rather should open up further research on the nature of memories and information storage, and the processes involved in both.

P/S -- I didn't mean to sound like an asshole. So I came back to add this:
Cheers! And thanks for the topic.

[edit on 12/4/2007 by Mr Jackdaw]



posted on Dec, 4 2007 @ 09:42 PM
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I with ya I got your Ideology it is like knowing the difference between ABC's and 123's ,I think if they would of used letters instead of numbers they would of gotten the same results....I dont in anyway think a chimp could make a word on his own....Wonder what would happen though if they mixed numbers with letters??? I thought the way the press worded it was kind of a slap in our face....



posted on Dec, 5 2007 @ 01:49 AM
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Well, the media has a tendency to sensationalize news -- a fact I'm recently coming to actually see for myself. It would be easy to assume (from the headline alone) that the article implies that chimps have an overall better memory than humans. I think, however, that it doesn't go in depth enough to warrant such an assumption. In fact, I don't think the article contains enough information to have used such a blatant headline -- unless I'm missing something, of course.

As for mixing numbers and letters, I'm sure the results would be the same. Remember that alphabets and numbers are ultimately just symbols we inscribe. We understand the (potential) complexities behind them, and the numerous concepts they symbolize. For example, "x" is either a mathematical variable, the twenty-fourth letter of the alphabet, a Greek letter [chi], or a marker on a map. To a chimp, "x" is a symbol consisting of two intersecting lines -- even if the chimp doesn't associate elaborate explanations with it. If you were to point out an X to the chimp later, I don't see why the chimp wouldn't recall it: X is a unique-looking, easy-to-remember letter.

Now, if you pointed out an X -- in a mathematical equation -- to a 5 year old chimp, which then proceeded to solve for X and approximate to the nearest thousandth place -- then you might have real cause for concern.



posted on Dec, 5 2007 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by Sentinel 1
 


It has Never been Man Vs. monkey, MAN has been to MOON and back, What has Monkey done



posted on Dec, 19 2007 @ 03:29 PM
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Originally posted by bone13
reply to post by Sentinel 1
 


It has Never been Man Vs. monkey, MAN has been to MOON and back, What has Monkey done


...evolved into man?


Couldn't resist.



posted on Dec, 19 2007 @ 04:22 PM
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Chimps are not monkeys, they're apes. What are humans? Apes...




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