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A survival stove should burn wood!

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posted on Dec, 6 2007 @ 08:07 PM
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Couldn't agree with ya more, I have been thinking about creating a woodburner for my pack.. something that would augment my cooking kit and still be usable in a survival situation. Mind you if it came down to the real beans I would most likely jettison this and opt for an old fashioned campfire, but I still like the convenience factor.

Here is what I have so far, just hoping it will work out for wood fuel:

Design:


Setup:


Kit:




It's pretty simple, basically a chunk of stovestack with some holes for ventilation and two titanium stakes for support. Once snapped together it will form a basic potstand/windscreen for my alky-stove and also doubling as a chimmney-style woodburning stove. Weather permitting, I should be able to test it out soon. Looking forward to posting the results.

Calling all pyromaniacs!


cheers,
T

(hoping the links work)

(edit... for clarity and to link testing)

[edit on 6-12-2007 by telemetry]




posted on Dec, 7 2007 @ 04:03 PM
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reply to post by telemetry
 


I like your creative thinking and photos, keep us posted on the results
Stoveman



posted on Dec, 7 2007 @ 04:15 PM
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Not really homemade but I bought both these gadgets.
www.iwantoneofthose.com...

The firebowl folds up into a small dome that you can place your firelighting tools inside for a smaller pack.
The grilliput can be used over it or an open fire and folds into a small flute sized tube.

Both quite weighty though but should last forever.



posted on Dec, 8 2007 @ 01:00 PM
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Originally posted by reluctantpawn
The Apaches were considered to be the best at guerrilla warfare. Many of there approaches to this are still viable.

respectfully

reluctantpawn


I think there may be a few Afghanies who would argue this with you


As far as the Apache fire, pit it is the same. Just depends on where you learn it from I guess. I made one last night as a demonstration for a friend of mine and he proceeded to step in itonce he became a little buzzed. I did not have a grate or anything to cover the burnie side with. Very funny though. Good times had by all except a single right foot.


And we made some great burgers using a frying pan once the coals got hot enough and the smell of burnt hair dissipated.



posted on Dec, 10 2007 @ 11:11 AM
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tinhatman,
Your right the Afghans have kicked major butt in the world and I'm afraid ours included. It might make a good match-up. The Aussie Abos are a strong people as well as some Masai trackers I have met. Sorry for hi-jack.

respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on Dec, 25 2007 @ 09:00 PM
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Where we live its hard to have a wood stove, but I am getting ready to build an outside fireplace like the one my grandpa use to have, that way we can cook outside if we ever have to, it will also have a roof over the cooking area. This way it will still be ready to use during rain if needed. Another thing I used in Maine was a small charcoal grill and I would put wood in there instead of charcoal. it worked great.

Hilda



posted on Jan, 2 2008 @ 10:45 PM
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With a little ingenuity one can stack up 20 salvaged cinder blocks and 40 bricks to bake bread. No mortar needed.

Dinner proves it.

off grid,

Sri Oracle



posted on Jan, 4 2008 @ 01:54 AM
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I've found that a heavy-ass cylinder block works very well for a controlled flame. Prop the block up to allow a little air flow from beneath, and keep feeding the fire for about 15 minutes. It keeps smoke at a minimum, which is always a plus under hiding situations, and the holes are just large enough to cook cuts of meat over, particularly fish. If you feed to fire long enough so that the holes are half filled with hot coals, then you've got a natural low-risk all-night heater (tested this in a tent). Also, feel free to dry your clothes over it after the flame is gone. ...Just don't forget them.


[edit on 4-1-2008 by MisterEAnonymous]



posted on Jan, 27 2008 @ 12:13 AM
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A few years ago Dean Ing published two paperback books "Pulling Through" and "The Chernobile Syndrone- and How to Survive It", that contained plans for a wood burning backpacking stove made from from a number 10 (1 gallon) can with a 3" diameter stove pipe that needed no blower for a roaring fire.

For better cooking I would use a more efficient pot, one that held the hot air against the bottom and side of the pot longer for more complete heat transfer. My ideal pot would have an "M" shaped cross section (like a stainless steel dog bowl) with fiberglass wool and cloth insulation on the inner surface of the outer skirt of the pot.

For a horse packing hunting camp, I would take a military surplus machine gun ammo box. peel the diagonal re-enforcing strip off one side for a flat cooking surface, cut a stove pipe hole in the bottom, and weld three nuts on the other flat side for three 12" -18" bolts for removable legs. The box lid becomes the firebox door. A piece of expanded metal in the firebox holds the wood up off the metal for better airflow and burning.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 09:22 AM
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7 men, 3 dogs, and 2 cats will stay warm near the same fire than one man would shiver near if left alone.

Sri Oracle



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 09:27 AM
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still don't get why people want to carry a stove around when they can dig a pit or look for a low spot or just pile up rocks ..

Oh well you guys carry the stoves I'll carry extra food it'll be worth the added wait and inconvenience



Respectfully
GEO

[edit on 1/28/2008 by geocom]



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 09:51 AM
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I really like the CAN STOVE. I made a few and they work nicely using alcohol.

I also like the SOLAR OVEN for fireless cooking. I am making one with my son for his science fair.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 09:58 AM
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I agree less is best. I like to go as primitive as possible, unless I know I will be out late or it might be too wet. It can be hard learning to leave technology behind. I like my fire piston and a small tinder kit of char-cloth. If I were staying put I like the waste oil idea I posted previously.

respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 10:12 AM
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A wood stove is the best way to go, but remember fires and smoke are a sure giveaway in a survival situation. As I've said in a previous post, cutting down significant numbers of trees will also give your presence away. Use debris as much as possible.

Other fuel source like oil and alcohol will run out eventually, and if your stove isn't multi-fuel capable, it will just be one more useless item to pack around. Think of a gun without bullets.



posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 07:55 PM
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The BushBuddy Stove is one of the best out there. I've used them, burn very hot with much less wood needed which translates to less smoke (a good survival asset) and faster boiling times.



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