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A survival stove should burn wood!

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posted on Dec, 4 2007 @ 05:47 PM
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A long term survival stove would need to burn wood in case of fuel supply problems.
A survival stove would need to cook in all weather, even in the rain and wind with minimum shielding.
A hot meal or liquid when it is cold, wet, and windy may even save you from hypothermia.
A bad weather stove would need maximum shielding and combustion air control.
What do you think?
How much weight would be acceptable for sutch a stove?




posted on Dec, 4 2007 @ 06:33 PM
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they weigh nothing because they are called fires, the kind you make in a pit in the ground--you know the old fashion camp fire.


i guess you could make some sort of stove device to lug around too but more than being heavy it would be kind of bulky, don't you think?



posted on Dec, 4 2007 @ 08:55 PM
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This one works for me.



It's very light, serves as a container for carrying other items and the price was right. Free!!



posted on Dec, 4 2007 @ 09:06 PM
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reply to post by stoveman
 


It would need to burn whatever was available. This means providing heat while not introducing toxic vapors via improper exhaust.



posted on Dec, 4 2007 @ 11:34 PM
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I am a big fan of the Trailstove. I have also been looking into building something along the lines of littlbug stove. For now its the swiss mess kit for me.

If I had the money, I would get a Kifaru with the quickness.



posted on Dec, 5 2007 @ 04:49 AM
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Cooking on an open fire is difficult in the rain and wind.
An unshielded pot sitting on a burner does not boil well or at all in the wind.
I need to see a trail and littlebug stove.
Maintaining good dry fuel will be important for clean combustion.
For long term situations size may not be as important as ease of use.



posted on Dec, 5 2007 @ 09:05 AM
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here you go guys, won an award this year for its simplicity:


www.cato-projects.org...

it is pretty cool bit of kit, you can even burn wet wood !!

snoopyuk



posted on Dec, 5 2007 @ 09:15 AM
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reply to post by stoveman
 


Not if you have dug a pit the rain may still be there but no wind and I tend to cook with the coals once the fire has died down a little you can also use a nice flat stone to place in between the fire and pot or pan you are using let it get good and hot and then do some cooking..Don't use sandstone or river rock fresh from the river it can explode I have never used river rock but learned my lesson from sand stone a hot piece of stone in the face is not nice..

here is a link to some homemade equipment plans and so on including stoves
www.backpacking.net...

Respectfully,
GEO

[edit on 12/5/2007 by geocom]

[edit on 12/5/2007 by geocom]



posted on Dec, 5 2007 @ 09:16 AM
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If you have a permanent place to stay a waste oil stove would be ideal. I saw plans for one in MOTHER EARTH NEWS not too long ago that was ideal for a small home or garage. Fuel would be plentiful if you are not too far out in the wilderness. For anything outside I prefer the whisperlite international, it burns most any liquid fuel. Other than that if I'm going primitive I like an Apache fire pit. Nearly invisible and smokeless.

respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on Dec, 5 2007 @ 09:18 AM
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reply to post by reluctantpawn
 



great suggestions, both of 'em man! a star for you! whisper light international is a sweet little stove, i love mine



posted on Dec, 5 2007 @ 09:30 AM
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Absolutely never ever use a rock that has been submerged for any length of time. The water will penetrate the stone and start to boil. The expansion will cause it to explode quite violently. Cooking on coals is the only way to cook over an open fire, you can control the heat better. I've just forgotten that others might not know this. A good flat well scrubbed stone can make an awesome griddle if you have a little cooking oil to place in it. I've even once taken the time to cup out a stone to hold liquids. It took a very long time but was worth the effort.

respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on Dec, 5 2007 @ 03:10 PM
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I like an Apache fire pit. Nearly invisible and smokeless.
respectfully
reluctantpawn

That sounds interesting. How does it work?



posted on Dec, 5 2007 @ 03:21 PM
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I've had success with downdraft gasification stoves.


more info.
www.hedon.info...

There's even a few commercially produced units available, such as this one.


www.woodgas-stove.com...



posted on Dec, 5 2007 @ 10:07 PM
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Originally posted by stoveman
Cooking on an open fire is difficult in the rain and wind.
An unshielded pot sitting on a burner does not boil well or at all in the wind.
I need to see a trail and littlebug stove.
Maintaining good dry fuel will be important for clean combustion.
For long term situations size may not be as important as ease of use.


Here are links to the Trailstove and the Littlbug.

www.trailstove.com...

www.littlbug.com...

I have had some good success with mud stoves as well in the past.



posted on Dec, 6 2007 @ 06:27 AM
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I've used a bunch of different pack stoves and the best/easyest I have found is just a 3hour sterno tin, prop up rocks to hold cup for heating water/food. If a camp fire, the flat rock dealy works well as ReluctantPawn stated...The fire pit on my land is made from river rocks, no choice other then hauling rocks in, so you get a big, hot fire going and stand well back, the rocks will cook off and shatter/explode, after the fire dies down to cold, you go back and restack the now broken rocks into fire break. It will still pop and shatter sometimes, but very small...



posted on Dec, 6 2007 @ 06:34 AM
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If you do use the river rocks and fire them like I stated... Be warned, No chit...The sharp rock chips will imbed themselves in your hide, along with the flying rock shards will be hot embers wanting to start other fires, and the pit will be in constant need of fixing from rocks still cracking...



posted on Dec, 6 2007 @ 11:15 AM
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stoveman,
The Apache fir pit is really quite simple. dig two holes about eight inches in diameter and six inches apart. Make these holes about a foot deep. At the bottom of these holes dig out a small perpendicular tunnel between the two parallel holes making what would appear to be an underground "U" shape.Build your small fire in one of the vertical shafts. Air will be drawn in from the other hole. The flames will be hidden in the hole and can be cooked upon at ground level. Sometimes a flat rock, steel plate, or even your saucepan can be placed over it to cook. Another use is that you can actually crouch over it and remain warn. Two rules to this:
1 the fire must remain small or you will roast the wrong nuts
2 don,t fall asleep or see above
The best thing about this is that it cannot be seen unless you are right on it



posted on Dec, 6 2007 @ 04:19 PM
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Apache fire pit? I was taught that it was just called an Earth Oven.

you could also scoop a dugout approx 1 meter wide/tall/deep (or however much room permits) in the side of a small earth mound/ridge/ etc.. dig a chimney at a 75 degree angle out of the top, light fire inside sit near and enjoy. Helps to build a heat screen to sit behind you out of some wood though.

Take 4 long sticks jam them in the ground in sets of 2. Each stick per set would be about an inch or 2 apart, each set about 3 to 4 feet apart, stack sticks inside until you have a wall of whatever height your 4 long upright sticks happen to be. Will protect from wind and if you place yourself between screen and fire you will retain more heat. Build 2 or 3 walls like this 3 or 4 feet tall with the fire pit where the 4th wall would be you have a decent temporary shelter. I lived in one for a week when camping in Central Ohio. Lots of fun.



posted on Dec, 6 2007 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by Unit541
 


I believe that that is Dr Thomas Reed's design, a very good fan powered burner/stove. The batterys have to be recharged which may be an issue for long term use but those solar powered accent lights for about $7 has a solar cell and a rechargeable battery. That was one of Dr Reeds tips. He is quiet a wise man.

Stoveman



posted on Dec, 6 2007 @ 06:24 PM
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tinhatman , they may well be one and the same. The fir pit is very small and hidden from most observation. It can also be covered quickly. The key to this pit is ultimate concealability. It can be filled quickly and covered with debris so that only a very well trained eye will ever know it is there. This may well be the better thing to use if you are on the run or don't want to be seen. I have actually prepared my dinner near a ridgeline while others were out searching for me. I found it quite amusing. Others did not. Please don't ask. I have been taught to use only that which will be most economical. It is part of my heritage. The Apaches were considered to be the best at guerrilla warfare. Many of there approaches to this are still viable.

respectfully

reluctantpawn






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