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MI5 alert on China's cyberspace spy threat

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posted on Dec, 1 2007 @ 04:33 AM
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MI5 alert on China's cyberspace spy threat


business.timesonline.co.uk

The Government has openly accused China of carrying out state-sponsored espionage against vital parts of Britain’s economy, including the computer systems of big banks and financial services firms.

In an unprecedented alert, the Director-General of MI5 sent a confidential letter to 300 chief executives and security chiefs at banks, accountants and legal firms this week warning them that they were under attack from “Chinese state organisations”. It is believed to be the first time that the Government has directly accused China of involvement in web-based espionage. Such a blunt and explicit warning from Jonathan Evans could have serious diplomatic consequences and cast a shadow over Gordon Brown’s first official visit to China as Prime Minister early in the new year.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Dec, 1 2007 @ 04:33 AM
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What is China playing at?

Britain gave back Hong Kong, we support the "One China" policy over Taiwan and even campaigned to remove the EU weapons embargo on them!

The question we should be asking ourselves in the West is can we trust China?

business.timesonline.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Dec, 1 2007 @ 10:00 PM
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Originally posted by infinite

What is China playing at?


Us at our own game it would seem.


Originally posted by infinite
Britain gave back Hong Kong, we support the "One China" policy over Taiwan and even campaigned to remove the EU weapons embargo on them!


We gave back Hong Kong because we had to, there was no altruism involved. We back them for the same reason - we need them just as much as they need us. Possibly more.


Originally posted by infinite
The question we should be asking ourselves in the West is can we trust China?


What we should ask in the West is whether the East will ever trust us again and what we can do to rebuild the respect that we once commanded.

No other country has involved itself in espionage for as long as we have and to the depths that we have. It was bound to catch up on us and bite us on the ass eventually. We shafted China a century ago, maybe it is pay back time and all our sins are about to be returned upon us....

What is more interesting, in my opinion, is how leaky things in military intelligence are getting of late...could be nothing but I wonder....either way, this so-called confidential letter - not very confidential is it...?



posted on Dec, 1 2007 @ 10:52 PM
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do chinese eat too much and have nothing to do, then orchestrate whatever espionage against UK? it is stupid idea. why do you really believe this?

state organisations? really kidding. chinese goverment have no time to do such tomfoolery.



posted on Dec, 1 2007 @ 11:09 PM
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Simply because a man in China's grandfather got shafted by a British man's grandfather is no reason for either of them to fight about it. None of those people are alive anymore so I don't see any reason to fret about it.

More likely I think the Chinese government is trying to give themselves a leg up without the effort of actually making any real developments. The Chinese people deserve proper working conditions, not stolen industry information.



posted on Dec, 1 2007 @ 11:24 PM
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Originally posted by infinite


What is China playing at?

Britain gave back Hong Kong, we support the "One China" policy over Taiwan and even campaigned to remove the EU weapons embargo on them!

The question we should be asking ourselves in the West is can we trust China?

business.timesonline.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)

Can you trust any power?

Just because we're useful allies today doesnt mean we always will be....

"Trust no one..."



posted on Dec, 1 2007 @ 11:39 PM
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Originally posted by cyberdude78
Simply because a man in China's grandfather got shafted by a British man's grandfather is no reason for either of them to fight about it. None of those people are alive anymore so I don't see any reason to fret about it.

More likely I think the Chinese government is trying to give themselves a leg up without the effort of actually making any real developments. The Chinese people deserve proper working conditions, not stolen industry information.


I understand what you are saying - but that is not the point that I was trying (and obviously failing) to make.

Britain taught the 'East' how to do business, they are now doing business the way in which we taught them.

We in Britain cannot now turn round and change the rules just because we are the ones being exploited. The pendulum swings boths ways.



posted on Dec, 2 2007 @ 08:11 AM
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Originally posted by KilgoreTrout
We in Britain cannot now turn round and change the rules just because we are the ones being exploited. The pendulum swings boths ways.


So true. When MI-5 and for that matter any other intel agency discloses their tactics only then can their comments be of use. Back to reality what if the Chinese made such claims ? You reap what you sow in this business.

brill



posted on Dec, 2 2007 @ 10:15 AM
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reply to post by wwssii
 


So you're denying that there's a single Chinese spy anywhere in the United Kingdom?

Espionage and stealing secrets is, realistically, the only way that China can keep up with the West simply because most of the major innovations of the twentieth and twenty first centuries have come from a Western nation (jet engines, stealth technology, missiles, radar, the internet...). You can't conjure up a scientific base as strong as those in North America, Europe and Australasia in a matter of years. It's a very long, very time consuming and very expensive process which China doesn't have the time to pursue if it wants to stay at the top table and hence I'm not at all surprised that the Chinese are engaged in this sort of thing (indeed, I'd be surprised if they weren't!) Nor would it surprise me if Western nations had large spy networks in China. It's the way of the world, I'm afraid, and this particular type of warfare has been getting more and more intense since the start of the Cold War.



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